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30 Hornets Invade and Kill 30,000 Bees

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    30 Hornets Invade and Kill 30,000 Bees

    I have a mortal fear of hornets, wasps, and bees. I hate them. I hate them a lot. I have absolutely no fear of anything else, trust me when I say that. I can walk up to a bear, tiger, or hold up a wild snake, been there done that. But I've never been stung before because the moment I see a bee, I either blast them with a hose or run like a girl in the other direction. When I was five, I used to wear a striped black and yellow shirt that magically seemed to repel bees - I called it the Bumblebee shirt. It's not exactly a phobia because I can be around them if I want, but a few childhood experiences sort of traumatized me.

    I hate em so damn much but at the same time they seem interesting. Here's a cool video I came across about 30 hornets that invade a bee hive and destroy 30,000 of its inhabitants. I didn't know who the hell to cheer for but I still have respect for these critters.

    http://stream.eizodana.com/olympus/m01_hi.wmv

    #2
    Been posted before but still cool to watch. These hornets are a force to be respected.
    "We spoke to them in the only language they understood: the machine gun"

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      #3
      my bad, double post
      "We spoke to them in the only language they understood: the machine gun"

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        #4
        You've walked up to bears and tigers? Were they babies?

        Oh, and you root for the bees, and against the hornets.

        Those giant hornets appear very nasty. Dismemberment for the win!
        “We are surrounded by warships and don’t have time to talk. Please pray for us.” — One Somali Pirate.

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          #5
          quite old, special note, those are Japanese Giant Hornets, not your garden variety normal sized hornets. Note the massive size diff. between the attacking hornets and defending honeybees.

          Each one of those giant hornets is about the size of your thumb.

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            #6
            Ants would own them both.

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              #7
              In bizzaro world maybe.

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                #8
                I think I just found a solution the the world's overpopulation: giant hornets.

                Also, I remember in physics we learned about how the only way bees really kill hornets and the like is to just swarm them and wait for their bodies to overheat.

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                  #9
                  When humans die off insects will rule the world.

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                    #10
                    If they were African bees that may have been a different story.
                    Sumus extra manum tuam.

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                      #11
                      I saw a cool thing on the discovery channel where this hornet invaded a tarantula's nest and they fought to the death, with the tarantula being owned and having the hornet's eggs laid on it.
                      Ranked #9 internationally at 118lbs by WIKBA http://www.womenkickboxing.com/wikba...rch%202009.htm

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                        #12
                        First off, insects are the most successfull animal phylum (if Im thinking of the right word) in the world. About half of the worlds animal population belongs solely to insects

                        In reference to the video the problem isnt so much the japanese hornets, but rather the honeybees that they're attacking. The honey bees were introduced by humans to the japan mainland, where they were ill equipped to deal with the japanese hornets.

                        Heres where shit starts to get really interesting though- evolution at its best, the honeybees have discovered a way to fight back:

                        I dont know quite how the honey bees figured this one out, but they can survive at higher temperatures than can the japanese hornets (by about 2 degrees celcius if that). Normally, a hornet attack is carried out as follows: a hornet scout goes out for the day, finds a nest, checks it out and goes back to get reinforcements and commence the slaughter. The trick now is simply killing the scout before it has a chance to return to its own hive

                        Heres how the honey bees go about doing this- when the hornet approaches the nest entrance, all the bees back up so as to "invite" the hornet in to check out the space and see whats on the inside. Once inside, hundreds of bees pounce on the hornet scout and smother him while they violently move their wings and appendages to turn up the heat. Since the honey bees can survive at a higher temperature, the hornet will die of a heat stroke before the attacking bees will, and the nest is saved.

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                          #13
                          Originally posted by Gumby
                          First off, insects are the most successfull animal phylum (if Im thinking of the right word) in the world. About half of the worlds animal population belongs solely to insects

                          In reference to the video the problem isnt so much the japanese hornets, but rather the honeybees that they're attacking. The honey bees were introduced by humans to the japan mainland, where they were ill equipped to deal with the japanese hornets.

                          Heres where shit starts to get really interesting though- evolution at its best, the honeybees have discovered a way to fight back:

                          I dont know quite how the honey bees figured this one out, but they can survive at higher temperatures than can the japanese hornets (by about 2 degrees celcius if that). Normally, a hornet attack is carried out as follows: a hornet scout goes out for the day, finds a nest, checks it out and goes back to get reinforcements and commence the slaughter. The trick now is simply killing the scout before it has a chance to return to its own hive

                          Heres how the honey bees go about doing this- when the hornet approaches the nest entrance, all the bees back up so as to "invite" the hornet in to check out the space and see whats on the inside. Once inside, hundreds of bees pounce on the hornet scout and smother him while they violently move their wings and appendages to turn up the heat. Since the honey bees can survive at a higher temperature, the hornet will die of a heat stroke before the attacking bees will, and the nest is saved.
                          Evolution is a bitch and every sci-fi book say that insects will rule the earth...that or morlocks!:offtheair

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                            #14
                            I fucking hate bees, hornest, wasps, etc.

                            I want those hornets to kill every last bee on earth.
                            Then the hornets can all die of gonnorhea and rot in hell.

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                              #15
                              Originally posted by odacon
                              Ants would own them both.
                              It's true:

                              Bullet Ant

                              Paraponera (F. Smith, 1858) is a genus of paraponerine ants famous for its sole species, the so-called bullet ant P. clavata, named on account of its most powerful and potent sting, the sensation of which has often been likened with that of being shot with a bullet by those who have had the misfortune to be at its receiving end. The pain caused by this insect's sting is the highest among all insect bites and is ranked as the most painful according to Schmidt Sting Pain Index. It is said that it takes a full 24 hours for the pain to recede.
                              Or:

                              Bulldog Ant

                              Myrmecia, often called bull ants or jack-jumpers, are well-known in Australia for their aggressive behavior and powerful stings. The venom of these ants has approximately a 3% chance to induce anaphylactic shock in their sting victims. Until the introduction of a vaccine the stings could, if gone untreated for only a matter of hours, be lethal. These large, alert ants have characteristic large eyes and long, slender mandibles and they have superior vision, able to track and even follow, intruders from a distance of 1 meter.
                              Australian ants for teh win.

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