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Training: maintenance vs. improvement

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  • Zapruder
    replied
    Originally posted by JohnnyS
    I think Garbanzo Bean hit the nail on the head. If you go in with a plan then you can improve, even if you don't train often. Mid last year due to work commitments I was only train once or twice a week but because I was committed to working a certain guard pass then I think my skills improved dramatically.

    Unless I'm training for a competition I usually only train 3-4 times per week. Some of my training partners used to train everyday but came around to the same conclusion that I did, which was that more does not necessarily mean better.
    Law of diminishing returns

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  • JohnnyS
    replied
    I think Garbanzo Bean hit the nail on the head. If you go in with a plan then you can improve, even if you don't train often. Mid last year due to work commitments I was only train once or twice a week but because I was committed to working a certain guard pass then I think my skills improved dramatically.

    Unless I'm training for a competition I usually only train 3-4 times per week. Some of my training partners used to train everyday but came around to the same conclusion that I did, which was that more does not necessarily mean better.

    Leave a comment:


  • Xanen
    replied
    Originally posted by Garbanzo Bean
    In short, I really think it speeds up my improvement if I go to class every time with a plan. What am I doing poorly? What am I doing well? How do I make myself get better at the things I'm not good at? Focus on a few things at a time. Keep it managable.

    This is obviously something that a true beginner will have trouble with, so him, I'd suggest planning on how best to develop an overall game and become comfortable with whatever he is doing.

    I think a plan is just as important to improvement as the amount of time spent on the mat or in the ring/cage.
    Definitely. I've tried to adopt this approach as well, but being a relative beginner (1 year BJJ) and coming off of a 2.5 month injury layoff it's been hard to dictate the positions I want to work on. It's kind of tough trying to work on your armbars from guard when you aren't in that position very long. My original game plan was shot. But that brought me to the real issue: Rather than improving my armbar from guard, I should be working on my side mount escapes. Yeah, I know, pretty obvious huh? However, just focusing on that idea while rolling has improved my side mount escapes tremendously. Consequently, I get to spend more time working on my armbar from guard.

    As another data point, despite being a noob, I hadn't lost too much skill-wise after 2.5 months off. I attribute that to doing constant visualization while sidelined. Mentally, I was just as much in the game as ever, if not more. I took the time to read over all of my training/technique notes and rediscovered details that I had forgotten or not noticed the first time around. My conditioning on the other hand, went to hell. Oddly, though, my flexibility had improved.

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  • jnp
    replied
    Originally posted by Garbanzo Bean
    Sorry to hog up the thread again, but the past few months have given me some perspective on the amount of time you need to spend training to improve.
    You're not hogging anything. I've started 5 threads, not including my training log, since I got here. I usually mull a new thread idea over for a month before I decide it's worth it. Consequently I'm genuinely interested in member's responses to this thread, especially if it changes over time.

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  • Cassius
    replied
    Sorry to hog up the thread again, but the past few months have given me some perspective on the amount of time you need to spend training to improve.

    In short, I really think it speeds up my improvement if I go to class every time with a plan. What am I doing poorly? What am I doing well? How do I make myself get better at the things I'm not good at? Focus on a few things at a time. Keep it managable.

    This is obviously something that a true beginner will have trouble with, so him, I'd suggest planning on how best to develop an overall game and become comfortable with whatever he is doing.

    I think a plan is just as important to improvement as the amount of time spent on the mat or in the ring/cage.

    Leave a comment:


  • Tacitus
    replied
    I go three times a week, always. When I can swing it with my work schedule, I'll go four or five. Two of my classes a week are 3 in a half hours long and the other is an hour and a half. I find this is the minuimum for me to continue moving forward.

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  • Zing!
    replied
    As a relative beginner, I find that it's not just how often, but what I practice that dictates the quality of my training and, consequently, how much I'll improve.

    If I were to practice an hour of straight randori every day for a month, I'd probably improve my balance and movement. But if I took some time for technique, maybe 15 minutes of every hour, I think that I'd improve a lot more.

    To directly answer your question, I think that, assuming the person in question has a good grasp of the basics, three times a week is the minimum to really improve. Once a week will maintain the current skill level.

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  • jnp
    replied
    Bump. I thought this was a good thread topic, and I'd like to know what some of the rest of you think.

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  • Tourettes
    replied
    I think it also depends on how you focus and organize your practice time. For instance, if you try to cover everything you know in a few sessions per week or month, I would think that you'd at best maintain you skillset whereas if you concentrated on 1 or two techniques in a detailed, organized fashion during the same amount of time, you'd actually improve more (at least in the techniques youre practicing). Depends on the person though and how much you can focus and concentrate. But I agree with lawdog that if you can visualize outside of practice, your lack of actual practice time won't be as detrimental.

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  • FictionPimp
    replied
    well, now we know I need to practice memory fu.

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  • Omar
    replied
    *ahem* . . .

    The saying is:

    "Miss one day and you can tell. . . "

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  • FictionPimp
    replied
    I have heard a saying.

    Miss one week and you can tell.
    Miss two weeks and your teacher can tell.
    Miss three weeks and everyone can tell.

    I think you need at least 3 times a week to improve, and 1 time a week to keep your current skill level (But it better be a very intense one time a week). I've also found it doesn't help much to train for more then 2 hours at a time. Besides being tired, I dont seem to gain anything out of training for more then two hours, I start getting very sloppy and might actually be hurting my training more then helping it. So I limit my training to 1 and 1/2 hours of martial arts training a day. Of course I still do cardio or weights in the morning, but that is more of a maintence thing.

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  • dakotajudo
    replied
    Originally posted by lawdog
    It really is an excellent question. I'm fairly certain I'm correct about the maintenance thing simply because I've seen it over the years, but I'd love to see some research regarding the improvement aspect.
    Thanks for putting that thought in my head - now I'll be lost in PubMed for a few fucking days. (Seriously - I've got about 2000 citations to sort through, 'cause I'll see some topic I'd like to learn more on, so I hit the current research. I think I've pulled more than a couple references on skill aquisition, should be in there somewhere).

    Ah well, if I find anything interesting I'll let you know.

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  • Teryan
    replied
    I roll with people that are bigger and better than me alot in Judo, and when I go over to the ju jitsu class I seem to clean house in my weight and level. I train about 3x a week and i feel my self impoving constley, but i am about my first year in judo.

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  • jnp
    replied
    Originally posted by Egg Nog
    How long are you stuck training once a week?
    For the next month or two barring changes in my situation.

    Leave a comment:

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