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    Swords

    Okay, this is a basic (if fairly stupid) question. I've recently developed an interest in various Sword fighting methods :viking:

    So I was wondering what made the difference in various swords.
    Like how is a Rapier different from a Sabre

    How is a Katana different from...uh...another type of Katana.

    What was the thought behind each sword?

    Y'know, like the fencing swords, the kenjutsu swords, and whatever those bigass turkish swords are called.

    Stupid? Yes. Well....

    #2
    http://www.weaponmasters.com/?ID=WEAPONS&ITEM=SWORDS

    this site sells all types of swords. you can look and compare for yourself if you like.

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      #3
      Google. It's a wonderful thing.

      Comment


        #4
        This topic is overbroad.

        There are so many nations/cultures/clans who have used different swords throughout history it is very difficult answer your question, and I don't know if any of the sword people just want to spew thoughts on the particular swords they've trained with.

        Different swords are used in different applications, some swords are better at doing some things than others.

        This topic is on the level of "How do sword?"
        “We are surrounded by warships and don’t have time to talk. Please pray for us.” — One Somali Pirate.

        Comment


          #5
          Sort of ike asking about the differences in hand tools or guns, different swords for different jobs. :profe:
          Kung fu is translated as "stand around and talk."

          Comment


            #6
            www.swordforum.com

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by Gosai
              Okay, this is a basic (if fairly stupid) question. I've recently developed an interest in various Sword fighting methods :viking:

              So I was wondering what made the difference in various swords.
              Like how is a Rapier different from a Sabre

              How is a Katana different from...uh...another type of Katana.

              What was the thought behind each sword?

              Y'know, like the fencing swords, the kenjutsu swords, and whatever those bigass turkish swords are called.

              Stupid? Yes. Well....
              Not stupid, just been explored before and you can find more information than you can hope to ever read on the subject.

              It basically comes down to the purpose of the blade:

              Stabbing blades tend to be straight, thin, and relatively light (Rapier)

              Slicing blades tend to be curved upwards (Katana, sabre)

              Cleaving blades tend to be thick and heavy (broadsword)

              There is overlap between them, you can use a rapier to slash, a katana to stab, but the primary method of using the blade determines the general shape.

              Edit: Those are the three most common categories, and you can pretty much pigeon hole any blade into one of those three.
              "Quiet fool before I am kicking the butt!"
              -My three year old trash talking to me

              "Integrity can't be bought or sold---you either have it or you don't."
              -The Honky Tonk Man

              "If you can't be a shining example, at least be a dire warning."
              -My Father to me one day

              "No surprise. Until Aikido sheds its street-brawling, thuggish image, it'll never be mainstream."
              -Don Gwinn

              Comment


                #8
                I would love to learn how to use the katana. I practice FMA and I love their theory using sword/knife fighting and I do think its the most practical. But for the tradition, and for the art form I still want to learn - so what would the best style be for the katana? Kendo?

                Comment


                  #9
                  okay yeah, looking back on it the topic is rather broad but i'll look into those sites.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by Gosai
                    Okay, this is a basic (if fairly stupid) question. I've recently developed an interest in various Sword fighting methods :viking:

                    So I was wondering what made the difference in various swords.
                    Like how is a Rapier different from a Sabre

                    How is a Katana different from...uh...another type of Katana.

                    What was the thought behind each sword?

                    Y'know, like the fencing swords, the kenjutsu swords, and whatever those bigass turkish swords are called.

                    Stupid? Yes. Well....
                    Like other said before, different tools for different jobs. I've been doing CMA for about 5 years now so I'm pretty familiar with a good variet of weapons in that school, but have also been doing western fencing (sabre, foil, epee, tiny bit of rapier) for 2 years.

                    So, I might as well go with the questions you listed, can always post more later:

                    The rapier was a sword designed chiefly for one-on-one combat, tests of honor, etc. Only the very end of the blade is sharpened, and the point is razor sharp. As you might expect, the chief attacks with a rapier are thrusts to the chest and fleshy extremedies (arms, thighs). Also, quick cuts to the cheeks and arms are used to inflict pain and draw blood. The rapier is actually not a particularly deadly weapon, its wounds are uaully deep but clean; so it is meant more to settle disputes by first blood.

                    The sabre, on the otherhand, at least in its non-hungarian forms (modern hungarian sabre is very light and quick, also more of a first blood weapon) is heavy, brutal, and when successful leathal.
                    Due to its weight, it is not something you can swing and stop in midair, it relies on momentum to make sweeping arcs, making wide, cleaving cuts.

                    Katanas are usually two-handed weapons of butchery, however as they are held with two hands, precise cuts to extremedies are possible, as evidenced by aikido katana techniques wich emphasize avoiding direct blade-on-blade contact and slipping aside to cut at the hands and fore-arms.

                    The fencing swords have all become somewhat restricted by the rules under which they operate, but I can offer some background on each blade.

                    Foil derives from the European small sword with was popular around 200 years ago, and like the rapier, it was mostly a blade for settling disputes of honor and a show of status. The blade is of course much shorter than the rapier (the most ridiculously large of which could be up to 5 feet long and more like a spear than a sword), and so relied on thrusts to the chest and vital organs, as well as precise stabs and cuts to the extremedies.

                    The epee is a triangular-bladed thrusting weapon as well, also born out of the duelling craze of the 16th-19th centures. In sport fencing, it is solely a stabbing weapon, but can target anywhere on the body. The epee is also a wounding weapon, not meant to finish a duel or bout in a single grand stroke, but made to wound, grind down, and bleed out an opponent.

                    The modern fencint sabre derives from the hungarian cavalry sabre with its distinct hand-covering bell guard. As it was principally a horseback weapon, the target is only the upper half of the body (the cavalryman's legs were usually hard to target, if not covered by some sort of protective armor. The fencing sabre is much lighter, with a narrow flat blade. The guard protects the knuckles and most of the hand, but leaves enough room for the hand to maneuver the blade. The handle, like most sabres, its curved downwards, opposite the curve of the blade, so as to fit into the palm of the hand and facilitate the sweeping, cutting motions of a sabre.

                    And there you have it, it's lunch time for me.
                    "Every normal man must be tempted at times to spit on his hands, hoist the black flag, and begin to slit throats." H.L. Mencken

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by 5FingazofDeath
                      I would love to learn how to use the katana. I practice FMA and I love their theory using sword/knife fighting and I do think its the most practical. But for the tradition, and for the art form I still want to learn - so what would the best style be for the katana? Kendo?
                      Just think of it as a really long machette.
                      "Quiet fool before I am kicking the butt!"
                      -My three year old trash talking to me

                      "Integrity can't be bought or sold---you either have it or you don't."
                      -The Honky Tonk Man

                      "If you can't be a shining example, at least be a dire warning."
                      -My Father to me one day

                      "No surprise. Until Aikido sheds its street-brawling, thuggish image, it'll never be mainstream."
                      -Don Gwinn

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by 5FingazofDeath
                        I would love to learn how to use the katana. I practice FMA and I love their theory using sword/knife fighting and I do think its the most practical. But for the tradition, and for the art form I still want to learn - so what would the best style be for the katana? Kendo?
                        Kendo is the sport form of japanese swordsmanship.

                        You will want to see if you can find a school that teaches traditional kenjutsu if you are able, but that depends upon where you live.

                        Although kendo is fun, it is a far cry from traditional swordsmanship, but if you have nothing else around you or it just appeals to you, go for it.

                        Also I should warn you that Iaido is usually just forms and kata, however I know people make claims over the internet that thier Iai school teaches combat techniques and sparring too, but I have never been able to verify (because I did not even bother to try, not because I actually couldn't) such claims.

                        and "broadswords" were not much heavier than a katana or any other sword unless they were "parade" or "ceremonial" swords not intended to be used for combat, people have these misconceptions about european swords that they were basically sharpened clubs.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          but european swords are so obviously inferior to Japanese swords, which can cleave through stones and level castles and stuff. Clearly this is because Japanese swords are razor sharp and never dull. Ever. They also don't break, except as a plot device for anime.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by Peter H.
                            Just think of it as a really long machette.
                            People draw cut with a machete?

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Dude

                              I bet fifty bucks that someone does. They call it "machetekage ryu" and trace the use of the machete back to Minamoto no Yoshitsune.

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