Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Missing the point.

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Missing the point.

    maybe it's me.... i'll definately get told so in any case.

    It isn't the art that sucks.
    It isn't the school that sucks.
    It isnt the sensei that sucks.
    If anything sucks, it's you. You are uncommited, uncoordinated, and untrainable. If you do not put forth the effort to learn, the effort to train, and the desire to become a true student, you will not succeed.

    I'm tired of reading this BB and seeing 'wing chun/bujinko/TKD/etc sucks and BJJ and MT are 't3h d34d|y' ... ' your art is only as good as you train to be.

    Here's my vote that a dedicated vingtsunner can whup a lazy BJJer.

    I understand that i'm a newbie to this group, and am subject to severe criticism for this thread, but i stand by my sentiments.

    :angry7:

    kd

    </rant>

    #2
    So how does someone who trains hard in BJJ and MT compare to this dedicated vingtsunner?

    Comment


      #3
      Please post the video evidence.
      ANALIZING the evidence-Connie Morris, Kansas State BOE (bolding and underlining part of original quote, red is my emphasis)


      As long as you try to treat your subjective experiences as if they were objective experiences, you will continue to be confounded by people who disagree with you.-some guy on an internet messageboard

      Comment


        #4
        What was that analogy I used? That a good art won't make up for a bad fighter, but a bad art won't make a good fighter? There's shitty BJJ practitioners, but that doesn't mean Yellow Bamboo has any value to it whatsoever.

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by KenpoDude
          maybe it's me.... i'll definately get told so in any case.

          It isn't the art that sucks.
          It isn't the school that sucks.
          It isnt the sensei that sucks.
          If anything sucks, it's you. You are uncommited, uncoordinated, and untrainable. If you do not put forth the effort to learn, the effort to train, and the desire to become a true student, you will not succeed.

          I'm tired of reading this BB and seeing 'wing chun/bujinko/TKD/etc sucks and BJJ and MT are 't3h d34d|y' ... ' your art is only as good as you train to be.

          Here's my vote that a dedicated vingtsunner can whup a lazy BJJer.

          I understand that i'm a newbie to this group, and am subject to severe criticism for this thread, but i stand by my sentiments.
          What does this have to do with 'Techniques and Tactics' ? :icon_roll
          Kungfoolss, Scourge of the theory-based stylists, Most Feared man at Bullshido.com, and the Preeminent Force in the martial arts political arena

          Comment


            #6
            Why are they fighting? Who wants to win more? Who has more experience? Who is in the better health? Which one can stand the most pain? Which one has fought the other style before?

            It's never as simple as style vs. style. You can't judge it by videoclips.

            kd

            Comment


              #7
              NO . . .
              ANALIZING the evidence-Connie Morris, Kansas State BOE (bolding and underlining part of original quote, red is my emphasis)


              As long as you try to treat your subjective experiences as if they were objective experiences, you will continue to be confounded by people who disagree with you.-some guy on an internet messageboard

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by Kungfoolss
                What does this have to do with 'Techniques and Tactics' ? :icon_roll

                well, it has to do with the opposite of techniques and tactics... :icon_scra

                i wanted the opinion of those who visit this particular forum. If it should reside elsewhere, feel free to move it.

                kd

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by KenpoDude
                  maybe it's me.... i'll definately get told so in any case.

                  It isn't the art that sucks.
                  It isn't the school that sucks.
                  It isnt the sensei that sucks.
                  If anything sucks, it's you. You are uncommited, uncoordinated, and untrainable. If you do not put forth the effort to learn, the effort to train, and the desire to become a true student, you will not succeed.

                  I'm tired of reading this BB and seeing 'wing chun/bujinko/TKD/etc sucks and BJJ and MT are 't3h d34d|y' ... ' your art is only as good as you train to be.

                  Here's my vote that a dedicated vingtsunner can whup a lazy BJJer.

                  I understand that i'm a newbie to this group, and am subject to severe criticism for this thread, but i stand by my sentiments.

                  :angry7:

                  kd

                  </rant>

                  That's not necessarily true. Of course a lot of things depend on the individual and if that individual tries really hard, they could do really great things. But if all the individual is taught is crap, then they can do that really well, but it's still crap. Does this make sense? o_o

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by KenpoDude
                    Why are they fighting? Who wants to win more? Who has more experience? Who is in the better health? Which one can stand the most pain? Which one has fought the other style before?

                    It's never as simple as style vs. style. You can't judge it by videoclips.

                    kd
                    Can you judge it by long term trends in MMA competition and firsthand testimony?

                    Comment


                      #11
                      GAB Corp... if a good student would realize through sparring/research/study what doesn't work for him/her and adjust the techniques to work or disregard it completely. Given a place to train, the desire to improve, and insight, the student could acheive great things.

                      kd

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Aesopian,

                        MMA isn't a very realistic fight, simply because there's rules. You also get time to scout the opponent, view previous fights, search for weaknesses, counters, and strong points. He gets the same time to do the same to you. It's a different kind of preparedness.

                        To be honest, i haven't found any firsthand testimonials that were *that* objective, if you have any, i'd enjoy reading them. Feel free to post up or PM.

                        All i'm saying is that it's all up to the practitioner.

                        kd

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by KenpoDude
                          GAB Corp... if a good student would realize through sparring/research/study what doesn't work for him/her and adjust the techniques to work or disregard it completely. Given a place to train, the desire to improve, and insight, the student could acheive great things.

                          kd

                          Ok, I agree with that, but if you have to fix something that you were taught then what does that say about the style? I don't know, this seems to make sense in my head. Anyway, that was my main point.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by KenpoDude
                            Aesopian,

                            MMA isn't a very realistic fight, simply because there's rules. You also get time to scout the opponent, view previous fights, search for weaknesses, counters, and strong points. He gets the same time to do the same to you. It's a different kind of preparedness.
                            I AM SO FUCKING SICK OF HEARING THIS.
                            Imports from Japan, Shipping Worldwide! Art Junkie, Scramble, BJJ Spirits, Reversal...
                            Scramble Stuff

                            Comment


                              #15
                              I know someone who has been fighting for a long time. He has trained in a lot of "hardcore" schools and styles with hard sparring and competed in competitions. He did hardcore kung fu as kid; he has done boxing, kickboxing, Shidokan, karate, wing chun and more. He holds black belts in judo and japanese jiu-jitsu. He has hand-to-hand training from the navy. He has done all sorts of self defense courses in his training as a corrections officer. He used to do go "dojo storming" and beat up instructors.

                              Can you guess what style truly impressed him out of all he has done, and which is the only one that keeps him training, since it's depth and scope is so great? What did the black belt study who he describes as "just playing with me" the first time they sparred? What is the only art that keeps his interest after all these years?

                              Yes, BJJ.

                              Comment

                              Collapse

                              Edit this module to specify a template to display.

                              Working...
                              X