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Tai Chi principles in BJJ, no joke.

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    Tai Chi principles in BJJ, no joke.

    I don't expect this to start a flame b/c I'll be singing the praise of BJJ, but you never know.

    My experience in both:
    1 semester of BJJ taught at a university by Gracie Blue Belts. Gracie Academy in NYC (I think thats where they where from?)
    3.5 yrs Chen style Tai Chi

    The BJJ came before the tai chi for me, so I made these correlations in retrospect.
    The main thing was how relaxed and heavy(dead body weight) they where in their sparring. Sure the beginners(me too) where using tons of muscular strength. But the instructors where always relaxed and never lost their cool even against a spastic but strong and aggressive noob trying to twist their heads off.
    The relaxation lended itself to the BJJ practitioners having an effective dead weight on the opponent. This is a huge part of tai chi, sinking and relaxing to use your body weight to it's fullest. Extra muscular tension diminishes the dead weight effect. *note: i said extra, tai chi should not be limp like an egg noodle IMHO, for there will be no structure and you'll then be doing what my instructer calls "to fu". Relaxed does not imply weak, as these BJJ players demonstrated.

    Plus when watching the experienced BJJ guys roll, I noticed they where very smooth and fluid. Comfortable in any position. Not relying on strength but position, weight, and sensitivity.
    Reminds me of push hands. ;)

    on a side note: can anyone vauch for a good BJJ school in NYC that doesn't cost a fortune?

    #2
    Relaxation at appropriate times is found in nearly all the martial arts and numerous non-combative sports. BJJ is not employing any principles unique to taiji.
    Originally posted by The Wastrel
    I think the forum's traditionally light-handed approach to moderation has become untenable.

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      #3
      Originally posted by Shuma-Gorath
      Relaxation at appropriate times is found in nearly all the martial arts and numerous non-combative sports. BJJ is not employing any principles unique to taiji.
      What he said..

      You are powerfull when you look effortless, and effective.
      "Its not important to be strong, its just important not to be weak."

      Comment


        #4
        At least one BJJ instructor of note (Tim Cartmell, coauthor of Passing the guard) is also quite skilled in the internal martial arts. He has written eloquently on the similarities in approach; a bit of googling should turn it up.
        I would liken it to the boxing or the muay thai of internal kung fu, even though that's like calling apples the oranges of the apple world. --WalkOn

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          #5
          thatnks for the Cartmell info.

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by Osiris
            Oh please. Relaxation, flowing with things, sensitivity and the like is found in everything I've studied. Learned most of that in folkstyle which is hardly internal.
            Well, duh. Its always going to be a fundamental part of any grappling. Tai chi's not magical its a stand up wrestling and striking art.

            Originally posted by Stickx
            It must suck for legit practitioners of tai chi like Cullion to see their art get all watered down into exercise for seniors.
            Those who esteme qi have no strength. ~ Exposition of Insights into the Thirteen Postures Attrib: Wu Yuxiang founder of Wu style tai chi.

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              #7
              hey dabblah I cant think of anything in NYC that doesn't cost a fortune...hell I bought a sno-cone in the park for 50 bucks...and that was a deal!
              Secret moves such as hitting a thing with your hand and hitting a thing with your leg have been stolen and degenerated by arts like karate, boxing, muay-thai, Kung-fu, and basketball. -Epicurious

              I for one welcome our new Ninja overlords.
              -Whiteshark

              I figure fighting a group of chunners would be like water torture, its not the force as such, just the constant trickle of chain punches wearing down your sanity. -The Juggernoob

              Comment


                #8
                ok, first of all I never claimed these things where unique to tai chi. Actually my point IS that these are fundamental concepts of all martial arts. Not unique or magical.

                Perhaps I should have refrained from stating the obvious, my bad.

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                  #9
                  Interesting topic. I don't have much experience in the martial arts, but always viewed them as variations of the same tune, so they necessarily contain the same elements.

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                    #10
                    Every MA is more or less heading in the same direction. The only things noteworthy about tai chi in this respect are the training methodology it employs for developing looseness and sensitivity and its early emphasis on these two qualities.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      I believe the difference is emphasis. Have a nice day.
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                        #12
                        about my looking for a good bjj school in nyc.
                        did a google on "gracie academy nyc" and the top result was an article about the two guys who taught the university bjj class i took years ago.
                        http://www.renzogracie.com/html/interviews/vale_tudo_class.aspx`

                        clearly a good school, but on my salary their tuition is a relative fortune. It'll have to wait.
                        I'll see about getting into their university class again for now.

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                          #13
                          I would sell blood to train at Renzo's in NYC. Yes, yes, I know how "expensive" it is, but considering the rent he pays, and more importantly, the quality of his instruction, I would work two jobs to train there. My instructor just spent a week there in December to get the latest and greatest from Renzo.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            I hear you. But I don't even have that much money left over at the end of the month right now, let alone having that much to spend on training. Plus I'm recovering from ankle surgery. So it would have to wait even if I had unlimited funds.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by Aesopian
                              I would sell blood to train at Renzo's in NYC. Yes, yes, I know how "expensive" it is, but considering the rent he pays, and more importantly, the quality of his instruction, I would work two jobs to train there. My instructor just spent a week there in December to get the latest and greatest from Renzo.
                              Out of sheer curiosity, how much are we talking here?

                              Comment

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