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Martial Arts and Job Applications - Bad Bedfellows?

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  • Feryk
    replied
    lwflee, if you are training frequently, it pushes the time for other activities to the side. That means that the interviewer will be wondering what you do in your free time. Going to the cinema and reading books is not generally regarded as a positive. It shows a lack of initiative, and a passive, escapist mentality. Unless you are a movie critic in your spare time.

    Doing MA or mentioning it in an interview isn't bad in and of itself. If you talk about enjoying maiming people, etc., then you're a dumbass. As Crimson Tiger said, you can pull relevant skills out of your MMA, and talk about how training MMA helps you build skills that you can apply to the job market.

    Bottom line, if the interviewer takes your MA experience as a negative, it's probably in the way you talk about it. These guys are (generally) trained to pick out themes from HOW you talk about your life experience as much as WHAT that life experience is. If it's a part of who you are, don't try and hide it.

    Unless you're in Hapko3's position, and your career based skills take up too much space. Then you can leave Hobbies out. But a lot of interviewers will want to discuss them anyways, so be prepared.

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  • Mark Su Kow
    replied
    Doing MA landed me my job. I admit I was totally unqualified for my position when I was hired in 2000. The guy that hired me did TKD and thought he was a ninja. They flew me up from South Carolina to Oregon to pretty much swap fight stories. So yes, put it on you job resume people will look at you as a "Clark Kent" and a doer. It also play into the respect, self control, discipline crap, employers love that.

    Leave a comment:


  • Scrapper
    replied
    mentioning MAs on my resume for mental health work got me fast-tracked to the crisis-intervention team. Better pay, better hours, more action.

    Bit intense, tho!

    If they want to know your interests, fine, but I wouldn't just start volunteering it. Some people get squirrelly when it comes up.

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  • NHB_Ben
    replied
    I've had several job interviews where I think mentioning MAs on my resume turned out to be beneficial. I only mentioned MAs on my resume because 1) I held an office in the club (I also listed other clubs in which I held office) and 2) because I had "experience instructing small (10 - 20 people) group recreational classes."

    A lot of times, if the interviewer isn't a martial artist, they know someone who is. At my last job interview, I talked with one of the employees for several hours about MAs while I waited to speak with different hiring managers.

    Additionally, to offset the 'violent' aspect, I try to mention the fact that I teach local LEOs. Also, if you're any kind of Bullshido member at all, you can almost definitely translate your MA experience into usable job skills. For example, when creating an MMA program, you have to identify your strengths and then find basic, pragmatic strategies. Once that is done, you have to assemble the various bits of your training into a program that accelerates your growth. Or maybe you had some sort of beginning MA class where you had to organize a syllabus that would both benefit experienced althetes and a inept slobs.

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  • NextGuard
    replied
    Originally posted by lifetime
    Having an interest in sports and MA tends to shape you up as a well-rounded individual. They give you character; interviewers tend to remember you better.

    It can also be useful to list it if you have instructor experience. Teaching/training others indicates transferable skills and the ability to work with others.

    Leave a comment:


  • Greese
    replied
    It depends on this...most of my accomplishments are academic. They see that and thing nerd. Then they see Judo/Wrestling/BJJ etc and they look at you as more of a real person.
    They probably see a 100 people with the same academic credentials, but how many martial artists do they see?

    Leave a comment:


  • jzs
    replied
    Originally posted by lwflee
    Have any of you have applied for a white collar job and listed Martial Arts under interests? Do you think doing so will be detrimental to the application? Lastly, how would you explain why you are interested in the Martial Arts to the interviewer?
    I've listed my interest in taijiquan on my B.S. thesis and have brought it up in job interviews when asked what my interests are.

    Taiji doesn't carry the stigma of being violent, so it really wasn't an issue. I've found, since most of the jobs I've applied for are technical in nature, that they like that I'm interested in something that is more on the artistic side of the spectrum.

    Leave a comment:


  • Reikon
    replied
    Originally posted by lwflee
    My egs were made in jest; i was merely soliciting for suggestions. Now, if i do mention MA, i would probably say that i do a mix of boxing and wrestling.

    I am tempted not to mention MA, however the sad fact is that between univeristy and MA, i have not had time for much else (read: i am a sad, sad person with no real hobbies to speak of). That would leave a conspicuous gap in my application and i am worried it would reflect negatively on me.

    I could just put reading and going to the cinema, but aren't those oh-so-cliched?
    Are you ashamed to be a martial artist or something?

    Leave a comment:


  • lwflee
    replied
    My egs were made in jest; i was merely soliciting for suggestions. Now, if i do mention MA, i would probably say that i do a mix of boxing and wrestling.

    I am tempted not to mention MA, however the sad fact is that between univeristy and MA, i have not had time for much else (read: i am a sad, sad person with no real hobbies to speak of). That would leave a conspicuous gap in my application and i am worried it would reflect negatively on me.

    I could just put reading and going to the cinema, but aren't those oh-so-cliched?

    Leave a comment:


  • Greese
    replied
    IF you are having to ask how to explain MMA than you are probably not quick enough on your feet to have the questions brought up. Rehearsed answers sound rehearsed. Don't mention it.

    Leave a comment:


  • CrimsonTiger
    replied
    If you think that explaining martial arts is "GnPing someone" or "breaking bones", you have the maturity of a 16 year old. Even MMA is still a martial art...karate, jujutsu, wrestling, boxing...all of them started as a form of physical discipline, with the true champions coming from those who had the mental discipline to elevate their game. If you were an MVP basketball player, how would that help you in your job? It wouldn't directly, but it would show you had leadership, you excelled when you focused on your goals, you were a competitor and you could make snap decisions in the heat of the moment. THOSE are what you should focus on. If you don't want to call it MMA, chose a discipline that represents part of what you train and use that. Boxing if you do a lot of hand drills. BJJ, JJJ, whatever. They aren't going to care what name you give it.

    As for being new...*shrug* Gotta start somewhere. Use other examples of where you have excelled and how they pushed you to want to challenge yourself physically as well as mentally.

    I've almost always been asked about my interests. As simple as "what was the last book you read?" to "Where do you usually snowboard?" They don't care about the answer, they want to see how you handle an off-hand question, and want to see if you're lying about your diversity of interests or if you're actually an avid reader. I always have one "experience" for each of my hobbies in mind, so I can relate back to it for any question. Even if it's a 10 year old experience...they don't know that, so it's a valid reply.

    Leave a comment:


  • Cdnronin
    replied
    Originally posted by lwflee
    Thanks for the responses y'all; keep it coming. Fitness, self-discipline, etc are certianly things that i will keep in mind.

    OTOH, imo, there are a number of problems with me listing MA under hobbies/interests:

    1. I am a noob at MA. Therefore, i have no MA accomplishments to speak of

    2. I do mma. How does one explain MMA w/o making it sound violent? 'Oh, i spend my time trying to GnP' or 'I try to break bones' will certainly not cut it.

    )
    While training, you are constantly looking for an opening, be it grappling, punching, kicking, choke, whatever, ranges change constantly and quickly. This actually helps you to multi task and think on your feet. Portray it as a high speed game of physical chess. Try and find out what if any hobby the interviewer does, make comparisons(if possible). If their asking these kinds of questions, it is in a relaxed mood to get you to open up about yourself. If you can compare the joy of MMA with say playing hockey, or dodging your way down a football field, avoiding a tackle, it may make more sense to someone who doesn't do martial arts.

    Leave a comment:


  • Stick
    replied
    MMA = result oriented, practical, do not waste time with the unecessary, modern, adaptive.


    But if you are t3h n00b..... then maybe you proably shouldn't make a fuss out of your MA.

    Leave a comment:


  • lwflee
    replied
    Thanks for the responses y'all; keep it coming. Fitness, self-discipline, etc are certianly things that i will keep in mind.

    OTOH, imo, there are a number of problems with me listing MA under hobbies/interests:

    1. I am a noob at MA. Therefore, i have no MA accomplishments to speak of

    2. I do mma. How does one explain MMA w/o making it sound violent? 'Oh, i spend my time trying to GnP' or 'I try to break bones' will certainly not cut it.

    If i list down say, karate, i am quite certain that the person reading the application or the interviewer will not have to ask, 'What is Karate?' With MMA, that question will certainly arise.

    What about the lawyers on Bullshido.net? How did you guys tell the recruitment manager that you spend your time trying to hurt ppl? (and still get the job)

    Leave a comment:


  • Cdnronin
    replied
    Originally posted by Meex
    Yes.
    As an employer, and manager who's done lots of interview, martial interests always look better in context. Length of training helps, because you are seen as soemone who sticks things out, and can handle adversity. Even if just starting, when asked why your answer should include phrases of self-discipline, fitness, broadening horizons, and even a competitive nature is seen as a positive.

    As an interviweee, when asked about my listed interests in ma, I usually give examples of how my training has given me insights into conflict resolution, how it has helped with crisis management, and problem solving. . .especially under pressure.

    `~/
    At my previous job, something my employer was looking for was someone in for the long run. The facts that I trained MA for 10 years helped, wasn't the only reason they hired me, but were impressed that anyone would pay for abuse that long.

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