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Martial Arts and Job Applications - Bad Bedfellows?

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    #31
    Originally posted by lifetime
    Having an interest in sports and MA tends to shape you up as a well-rounded individual. They give you character; interviewers tend to remember you better.

    It can also be useful to list it if you have instructor experience. Teaching/training others indicates transferable skills and the ability to work with others.
    NextGuard = Paul from Atlanta

    Ten years experience can be ten true years or one year repeated ten times.

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      #32
      I've had several job interviews where I think mentioning MAs on my resume turned out to be beneficial. I only mentioned MAs on my resume because 1) I held an office in the club (I also listed other clubs in which I held office) and 2) because I had "experience instructing small (10 - 20 people) group recreational classes."

      A lot of times, if the interviewer isn't a martial artist, they know someone who is. At my last job interview, I talked with one of the employees for several hours about MAs while I waited to speak with different hiring managers.

      Additionally, to offset the 'violent' aspect, I try to mention the fact that I teach local LEOs. Also, if you're any kind of Bullshido member at all, you can almost definitely translate your MA experience into usable job skills. For example, when creating an MMA program, you have to identify your strengths and then find basic, pragmatic strategies. Once that is done, you have to assemble the various bits of your training into a program that accelerates your growth. Or maybe you had some sort of beginning MA class where you had to organize a syllabus that would both benefit experienced althetes and a inept slobs.

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        #33
        mentioning MAs on my resume for mental health work got me fast-tracked to the crisis-intervention team. Better pay, better hours, more action.

        Bit intense, tho!

        If they want to know your interests, fine, but I wouldn't just start volunteering it. Some people get squirrelly when it comes up.
        And lo, Kano looked down upon the field and saw the multitudes. Amongst them were the disciples of Uesheba who were greatly vexed at his sayings. And Kano spake: "Do not be concerned with the mote in thy neighbor's eye, when verily thou hast a massive stick in thine ass".

        --Scrolls of Bujutsu: Chapter 5 vs 10-14.

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          #34
          Doing MA landed me my job. I admit I was totally unqualified for my position when I was hired in 2000. The guy that hired me did TKD and thought he was a ninja. They flew me up from South Carolina to Oregon to pretty much swap fight stories. So yes, put it on you job resume people will look at you as a "Clark Kent" and a doer. It also play into the respect, self control, discipline crap, employers love that.

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            #35
            lwflee, if you are training frequently, it pushes the time for other activities to the side. That means that the interviewer will be wondering what you do in your free time. Going to the cinema and reading books is not generally regarded as a positive. It shows a lack of initiative, and a passive, escapist mentality. Unless you are a movie critic in your spare time.

            Doing MA or mentioning it in an interview isn't bad in and of itself. If you talk about enjoying maiming people, etc., then you're a dumbass. As Crimson Tiger said, you can pull relevant skills out of your MMA, and talk about how training MMA helps you build skills that you can apply to the job market.

            Bottom line, if the interviewer takes your MA experience as a negative, it's probably in the way you talk about it. These guys are (generally) trained to pick out themes from HOW you talk about your life experience as much as WHAT that life experience is. If it's a part of who you are, don't try and hide it.

            Unless you're in Hapko3's position, and your career based skills take up too much space. Then you can leave Hobbies out. But a lot of interviewers will want to discuss them anyways, so be prepared.
            Originally posted by pauli
            i was once told that "do" means wrecking people's shit for your own philosophical betterment.

            Originally posted by melvin_peebles
            I could be mistaking dumbness for delusion. I'll have to go dig out my DSM IV. It's great to have stumbled upon this site. The rich fauna and flora of mental dysfunction that exists in the martial arts is amazing. It's like the Galapagos.

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