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    Non-Competitive Judo

    My impression is that judo would be substantially more effective from an SD perspective if it were to ditch its competition ruleset. Has anyone actually done this?

    #2
    Competition ruleset has its advantages also.

    It promotes aggresive play, aggressive mindset, the desire to win, etc etc. Many of these things are quite handy in a SD situation.

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      #3
      Yrkoon9 is correct, competition has more pros than cons.
      you always concentrate on non-competetive stuff anytime, and zone in for a competition as the time comes.

      Submission oriented rules would be best for judo, but alas, I don't see that happening anytime soon.

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        #4
        I absolutely agree. I'm not knocking standard judo at all. I'm just wondering if anyone has tried teaching in a manner that retains Kano's philosophy, but avoids doing things (e.g. turtling) that would be a bad idea in most SD situations.

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          #5
          competiton is great for training youto use your MA in an effective manner against resisting opponents. it also has the benifits of getting you closer to the adrenaline rush and mindet you will be in during a fight. the problems arise when you train to win competitions based on the rules of the competition. if you turn out of throws to avoid the ippon but then allow your back to be taken you have sacrificed your SD for a win in a comp. the best is a school that competes but does not solely focus on it.

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            #6
            Non- competetition judo is basically a sub-fest. (Actually a lot of fun!) It breaks down very quickly into a jujitsu match, (nuthin' wrong with that!).

            But the others are right about competition, aggressive mindset, pro-active mentality, and high pain threshold are all excellent things to have in SD scenarios. The tournament scene's recent retreat from newaza in comps is a bad sign though. But I remember having a lot of fun and learning much in competetive judo...so while not perfect, it isn't a bad way to train.
            And lo, Kano looked down upon the field and saw the multitudes. Amongst them were the disciples of Uesheba who were greatly vexed at his sayings. And Kano spake: "Do not be concerned with the mote in thy neighbor's eye, when verily thou hast a massive stick in thine ass".

            --Scrolls of Bujutsu: Chapter 5 vs 10-14.

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              #7
              Whenever I taught/assisted in judo, it was always more submission based and I very rarely taught the turtle, or any other amphibian based move.

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                #8
                Not even teh d34dly "rabid salamander" escape!

                You do not know the real judo!

                Hansoku Make!
                And lo, Kano looked down upon the field and saw the multitudes. Amongst them were the disciples of Uesheba who were greatly vexed at his sayings. And Kano spake: "Do not be concerned with the mote in thy neighbor's eye, when verily thou hast a massive stick in thine ass".

                --Scrolls of Bujutsu: Chapter 5 vs 10-14.

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                  #9
                  Even the competitive aspect of Judo that does not promote extended groundwork could be interpretted as good SD strategy. After all, you most likely aren't going to have an unlimited amount of time on the ground. You probably need to get your shit going, or get the hell up. I hate to play devils advocate that kicks BJJ mentality in the nuts - but in a SD situation you really need to get up ASAP.

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                    #10
                    Originally posted by ronin69
                    Whenever I taught/assisted in judo, it was always more submission based and I very rarely taught the turtle, or any other amphibian based move.
                    But that relates more to your early-childhood frog trauma than to a technical approach.

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                      #11
                      Let me ask you guys this:

                      If you had to modify the competition ruleset for judo to encourage more effective SD, what would you do?

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                        #12
                        I'm sure there are a few clubs out there that do that, but not many. You can always practice your judo that way without telling anybody. That's why I never usually turtle up.

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                          #13
                          Originally posted by Repulsive Monkey
                          But that relates more to your early-childhood frog trauma than to a technical approach.
                          While this is true, it doesn't change the fact that turtling is a bad thing.

                          As for changing the rules, we have had a few threads like that.

                          For me:
                          More submission oriented.
                          Time limit for ground work, yes, BUT, only for stagnat work.
                          Anyone in the turtle is fair game for knees, elbows and wedgies.

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                            #14
                            I think the phrase "non-competition judo" is better. "Non-competitive" gives totally the wrong impression.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by Repulsive Monkey
                              Let me ask you guys this:

                              If you had to modify the competition ruleset for judo to encourage more effective SD, what would you do?
                              Shido for turtling more than 5 seconds.

                              More groundwork.

                              Leg locks.
                              And lo, Kano looked down upon the field and saw the multitudes. Amongst them were the disciples of Uesheba who were greatly vexed at his sayings. And Kano spake: "Do not be concerned with the mote in thy neighbor's eye, when verily thou hast a massive stick in thine ass".

                              --Scrolls of Bujutsu: Chapter 5 vs 10-14.

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