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    Job searching in places afar

    I am graduating in December and I'm looking to get a job someplace far away. It's not a requirement, but I'd like to see some of the world.

    How do you go about looking for a job when you aren't in that city/state/country? Would a wiser method be to move to the area first before looking for a job?

    There are a few target areas I have in mind in the U.S., but I'm willing to move just about anywhere on the planet that will offer a decent job and a good place to train nearby.

    I'm sure there are many members who have done this so I would like to hear what worked for you and what you would advise.
    MY NAME IS ANTAGONY I SUCK AT COMBAT SPORTS KTHX

    "blahblahblah, but I don't think I'm going to train tonight."
    "Fag."
    "Well if that were true, then I'd really REALLY want to come train!"

    #2
    Antagony -

    You are graduating with a CS degree right? If so you may have some serious issues scoring a gig in that field locally, much less abroad.

    It's also probably not the best time in the world to look at going abroad, and in tech in general you are going to be hard pressed to take a job outside of the us.

    Also, before moving around too much, you may want to try out a semi-local gig...would really suck to move out to nowhere for a first job out of college and realize it didn't work out, etc.

    If you plan on going for it anyhow, you may want to check with some headhunter agencies obviously, and you may have some luck if you are willing to cover your own relocation costs. For travel abroad, even though the pay sucks you may want to check out some civil service type work. If you went to enlist in the armed forces I believe there are some officer options as a college grad, etc...but not too sure.

    Believe it or not, the Texas job market for technology gigs is actually quite a bit better than most of the rest of the country...just something to keep in mind.

    Comment


      #3
      Yes siree, a Computer Science major.

      If anyone needs such a fellow, I'd be happy to e-mail you resume, hehe.
      MY NAME IS ANTAGONY I SUCK AT COMBAT SPORTS KTHX

      "blahblahblah, but I don't think I'm going to train tonight."
      "Fag."
      "Well if that were true, then I'd really REALLY want to come train!"

      Comment


        #4
        Me and several of my IT friends have had luck with ComputerJobs.com

        But if you are serious the only way to get a good tech job is to talk to a recruiting firm. Typically IT jobs that are full-time are on a contract -> permanent basis.

        Comment


          #5
          I'll add:
          Monster.com - create search criteria, jobs emailed to you: direct contact, can post resume
          Careerbuilder.com - create search criteria, jobs emailed to you: direct contact, can post resume
          jobs.com - search for jobs by region of the country, or by zip code: direct contact
          sigpic

          Comment


            #6
            Canuckyokushin:

            These women can do back flips right over my head and still land on there feet .GRrrrrrrr!

            feedback:

            THAT'S NOTHING, I USED TO KNOW SOME 12 YEAR-OLDS WHO COULD FIT INSIDE A SUITCASE AND STAY ALIVE FOR 7 OR WAS IT 6 HOURS

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by Antagony
              Yes siree, a Computer Science major.

              If anyone needs such a fellow, I'd be happy to e-mail you resume, hehe.
              I can probably hook you up with an sysadmin gig in San Antonio, and I know of a web developer (ASP) gig in St. Louis you could probably score.

              PM me what you want to do (career and salary wise) if you are interested.

              Comment


                #8
                Antagony, you might consider joining a larger (relatively speaking) company locally if possible. It'll give you enterprise setting type of experiences such as well defined processes and policies, bureaucracy and politics, and large scale projects. Additionally, with multiple operating or development locations, you can setup for a transfer at the company's expense.

                Obviously you'll need to put in hard work and demonstrate value, but that shouldn't be a problem. Professional work is much easier than MA. :user:

                I also graduated as a comp sci major back in the early 90's but instead of programming and development, I went into IT. Luckily I did fairly. Personally, IMHO, I think the first couple of years is just getting your feet wet and getting a bearing on what to do. The trick is landing the right company with the right managers to help you develop your career. Down the road, it's all about connections and reputation (your demonstrated skills).

                The Silicon Valley is looking up with a significant number of job increase, but there is also a lot of development near Austin and Dallas, and a little known place call Plano.

                Good luck
                zenbert
                Hold me... :3some:

                I love MA. Unlike many things in life, you get what you put in.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Find a job first. My mom and I moved to florida, before the job was secured, and we ended up living in a half-way house.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    In the UK, Jobserve.co.uk is the dogs bollocks for IT jobs. As for getting here in teh first place, teh British Embassy is your best bet... http://www.britainusa.com/
                    Last edited by SamHarber; 10/29/2004 5:04pm, . Reason: Must learn to spell
                    Taking responsibility for my actions since 1989

                    Comment


                      #11
                      If you're adventurous, go try for the JET (Japan Exchange and Teaching) Program? You can spend a year in Japan either teaching English or working to promote international exchange in a local government office in the day while learning some kickass martial arts at night. Sounds like something I'd wanna do for a year before jumping into the corporate world.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by Antagony
                        Yes siree, a Computer Science major.

                        If anyone needs such a fellow, I'd be happy to e-mail you resume, hehe.
                        IT recruiters tend to use the boards people posted here for open market hires - - that is EXPERIENCED candiates. Yes, you will find some entry level stuff...but this is the low probability approach.

                        My advice is to:

                        (A) network your ass off. Find people in the areas you are iterested and talk with them - - school alumni, neighbors, web forums (such as "The Vault"), former girlfriends, the kid you beat up in 7th grade, parent's friends, teachers, long-lost cousins, former cell mate you had while doing time for the hacking/DOS conviction....everyone you can thnk of! Most of the good jobs - especially entry level - are never posted or advertised.

                        (B) Research and obtain lists of companies who work in the areas you are interested. Start surfing their web sites and sending resumes. Better yet, try to find people who work from the company who can lead you to someone who can lead you to someone who actually knows a recuiter. Call the recruiter. Keep sendiing your resume.

                        (C) Keep building yur resume with courses and any experience you can get...even if it is an unpaid internship.

                        (D) E-mail me a copy of your resume. I do NOT do IT, but I work for a large IT company :headbang:

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by samadhi_fire
                          If you're adventurous, go try for the JET (Japan Exchange and Teaching) Program? You can spend a year in Japan either teaching English or working to promote international exchange in a local government office in the day while learning some kickass martial arts at night. Sounds like something I'd wanna do for a year before jumping into the corporate world.
                          This is actually something I've been considering. My minor is Japanese, so I'm familiar with the program.

                          If I recall correctly, the applications are due in March, so I've been thinking that if I can't get a job landed by then that I may give that a shot.
                          MY NAME IS ANTAGONY I SUCK AT COMBAT SPORTS KTHX

                          "blahblahblah, but I don't think I'm going to train tonight."
                          "Fag."
                          "Well if that were true, then I'd really REALLY want to come train!"

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Lots of sound advice, by the way. I appreciate everyone's input thusfar.
                            MY NAME IS ANTAGONY I SUCK AT COMBAT SPORTS KTHX

                            "blahblahblah, but I don't think I'm going to train tonight."
                            "Fag."
                            "Well if that were true, then I'd really REALLY want to come train!"

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Try to find a job first and maybe you can even find one that will pay your moving expenses.
                              "Those who can make you believe absurdities, can make you commit atrocities." Voltaire.

                              Comment

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