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Extreme Boxing by Mark Hatmaker (Video Review)

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    Extreme Boxing by Mark Hatmaker (Video Review)

    Quick Review:
    Extreme Boxing by Mark Hatmaker
    http://www.extremeselfprotection.com

    #2
    Extended Review Part 1

    Extreme Boxing by Mark Hatmaker
    http://www.extremeselfprotection.com

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      #3

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        #4
        Interesting review.
        Thanks!
        Canuckyokushin:

        These women can do back flips right over my head and still land on there feet .GRrrrrrrr!

        feedback:

        THAT'S NOTHING, I USED TO KNOW SOME 12 YEAR-OLDS WHO COULD FIT INSIDE A SUITCASE AND STAY ALIVE FOR 7 OR WAS IT 6 HOURS

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          #5
          Just found this thread again from the "Mark Hatmaker Bullshido Update."

          I have Hatmaker's NHB Striking book and in it he explains why he fights with the right hand forward. He is not a lefty, but says that in the days before the jab was invented, the "weak" hand was always held forward because the off hand (left) was used to "post" on the opponent as a way of measuring distance for the right hand to throw big punches.

          When the jab came into wide use and was quickly followed by padded gloves, the old-timers saw the gloves as robbing them of knockout power (power having been almost the exclusive focus of boxers before the jab ushered in the modern style.) These men saw it as more important than ever that the strongest hand should be used in a way that allowed it to travel the greatest distance before contact, i.e. held back while the other hand went forward.

          Now, Hatmaker contends that the real lesson of the introduction of the jab should have been that both hands can be used for smaller, setup strikes (jabs) and both can be used for power punches as well. He suggests that throwing jabs with whichever hand is in better position will often work better than having either side forward. I don't know about that, since he doesn't even seem to teach that approach himself.

          What he does say is that when wrestling and grappling are added into the mix, you want your strongest, most dexterous hand and foot to be out front to respond to takedowns and the like, not to mention that fighting "southpaw" can be disruptive to more traditional fighters.

          He DOES mention that the book is aimed at absolute beginners (like myself) and that he advises this because such people can learn it about as easily as the standard approach. HOWEVER, he admits that if you've spent a long time learning boxing with the conventional stance and hand position that it might not be worth the time for you to reprogram yourself, as he figures it would take about a month for most people. He does say that he himself has switched sides and prefers it, but it took him a concerted effort over time to be able to do it and the difference is slight enough not to bother if you're happy with the conventional approach.
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            #6
            Thanks Don.

            I like Hatmaker's material but still don't get his strong side forward that much. Especially for an old dog. Instead of retraining my side forward I'd rather spend that time grappling.

            In self defense I suppose we should be prepared to fight with either side.

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