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    Deadly lake

    This is from the Morbid Fact du Jour mailing list:
    ======================



    Persons not employed in the coal mining trade are unlikely to encounter deadly amounts of carbon dioxide, yet such clouds have been known to form in the open air and at a cost dear in human life. Which was indeed the case at Lake Nyos in Cameroon. Carbon dioxide naturally seeps from geothermal sources below that body of water and dissolves under pressure in the cold layer at the bottom of the lake. The water serves to hold the carbon dioxide in place, and over time the lake becomes infused with the compound. Once the saturation point is achieved (when the water can absorb no more carbon dioxide), the lake turns deadly. On the fateful night of August 21, 1986, the deep waters of the lake either reached their carbon dioxide saturation point or something happened to disturb the layer lurking at the bottom of the lake (such as a rockslide), and without warning the lake "turned over," its bottom layer shooting to the surface in a violent, frothy eruption of carbonated water that flew some 250 feet into the sky. The lake waters turned red as dissolved iron was sucked up to the surface by the turmoil. An estimated 100 million cubic metres of gas emerged from the lake in that explosion, quickly sweeping over the valleys surrounding Lake Nyos and, being denser than air, sinking to suffocate and poison the inhabitants below.

    Death came quickly. One man living just two hours on foot from the lake said, "We heard a noise, just like a gunshot." He immediately checked on his two young daughters, and found them already dead in their beds. A total of 1,746 people were smothered in the night, according to the official casualty toll. The deadly cloud covered an area of up to 12 miles around the lake, killing thousands of cattle as well.

    Culled from: Scopes.Com
    Lone Wolf McQuade Final Fight: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VmrDe_mYUXg

    #2
    wow
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      #3
      Spooky.


      Originally posted by ggboxer
      You know what, the hell with this shit. I'll leave my lame ass bitching ways and suck off the site management as my compliments, but I'll maintain my boobtastic status here always.

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        #4
        that first half was really turning me on there
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          #5
          Now THAT, is a chi fart !!

          Comment


            #6
            good thing that isnt in the drinking water...
            Locu5
            combat sports hobbyist

            Comment


              #7
              I've actually watched a documentary about this and the footage they showed of a nearby village afterwards was really terrible.

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                #8
                Damn, despite the massive loss of human life that is freaking awesome. I've always been intrigued by natural phenomon like this.

                It's kind of funny when you think of the earth ripping a foul wet one, so foul that it kills you. I bet it sounded like a sloshy wet fart too.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Re: Deadly lake

                  Originally posted by Wounded Ronin
                  This is from the Morbid Fact du Jour mailing list:
                  ======================



                  Persons not employed in the coal mining trade are unlikely to encounter deadly amounts of carbon dioxide, yet such clouds have been known to form in the open air and at a cost dear in human life. Which was indeed the case at Lake Nyos in Cameroon. Carbon dioxide naturally seeps from geothermal sources below that body of water and dissolves under pressure in the cold layer at the bottom of the lake. The water serves to hold the carbon dioxide in place, and over time the lake becomes infused with the compound. Once the saturation point is achieved (when the water can absorb no more carbon dioxide), the lake turns deadly. On the fateful night of August 21, 1986, the deep waters of the lake either reached their carbon dioxide saturation point or something happened to disturb the layer lurking at the bottom of the lake (such as a rockslide), and without warning the lake "turned over," its bottom layer shooting to the surface in a violent, frothy eruption of carbonated water that flew some 250 feet into the sky. The lake waters turned red as dissolved iron was sucked up to the surface by the turmoil. An estimated 100 million cubic metres of gas emerged from the lake in that explosion, quickly sweeping over the valleys surrounding Lake Nyos and, being denser than air, sinking to suffocate and poison the inhabitants below.

                  Death came quickly. One man living just two hours on foot from the lake said, "We heard a noise, just like a gunshot." He immediately checked on his two young daughters, and found them already dead in their beds. A total of 1,746 people were smothered in the night, according to the official casualty toll. The deadly cloud covered an area of up to 12 miles around the lake, killing thousands of cattle as well.

                  Culled from: Scopes.Com
                  You know they had a documentry about this lake.

                  Its pretty creepy lake. Very very deep.
                  Ghost of Charles Dickens

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Since the last time the lake "turned over" scientists have been working on a method of "draining" the Carbon dioxide from the lake in a controlled manner rather than waiting for the occasional burp to kill local villages. For their sake, I hope it works.

                    http://perso.wanadoo.fr/nyos/
                    People of integrity expect to be believed. When they're not, they let time prove them right.

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