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Politicians give terrible graduation speeches, but blame the students

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    Politicians give terrible graduation speeches, but blame the students

    Politico has an article where people claim that the reason that politicians give terrible lowbrow speeches at graduations now is because it's the students' fault.

    https://www.politico.com/story/2018/...ections-689499

    What a load. During one of my graduations many years ago Bill Clinton came and spoke. I can't remember what he said. It was totally boring. He was at the height of his popularity then and we know in hindsight that he probably charged like $250K for that speech and it contributed to all the graduates' student loan debt.

    Then I remember as everyone was leaving there was one crazy-looking guy not affiliated with the event trying to tell everyone that Clinton was some kind of sex offender. And of course, sadly, as history has shown, that supposed crazy guy everyone was ignoring might not have been too far from the truth.


    But no, blame the students. It's all their fault. It has nothing to do with the current quality of our politicians or the uninspired, mercenary nature of tired graduation speeches. Point the finger at the customer who is taking on that much more student loan debt to pay for that speech whether or not they attend or wanted to hear it in the first place.
    Lone Wolf McQuade Final Fight: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VmrDe_mYUXg

    #2
    To me the real question is, why do politicians give graduation speaks?

    I mean, it looks more as a stage for tho politician to increase his image than as an actual service for the graduates.

    (note: when I graduated in Italy 20 years ago we didn't have a collective graduation ceremony, but some universities in Italy today do).

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      #3
      Originally posted by MisterMR View Post
      To me the real question is, why do politicians give graduation speaks?

      I mean, it looks more as a stage for tho politician to increase his image than as an actual service for the graduates.

      (note: when I graduated in Italy 20 years ago we didn't have a collective graduation ceremony, but some universities in Italy today do).
      I mean, you basically answered your own question.

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