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    Things you didn't know about absinthe

    Absinthe is one of my favorite drinks. Not just because it tastes great and gets you drunk, but also because it has a really interesting and troubled history. Here's some of the stuff you probably missed:


    1. There's no "real," recipe for absinthe. Many claims have been laid to be the first or best, but it really is about as artisanal as you can get, even though the prime ingredients remain the same. Some recipes are heavier on anise, some on fennel, but grand wormwood (artemisia absinthium) is what makes it absinthe.
    2. Brian Warner (Marilyn Manson, to you plebeians) has his own absinthe recipe, called Mansinthe. It's one of my favorites, very heavy on the fennel. If you're looking for "the realz," though, you should try Kubler - it's as close to an original recipe that is still made, and enjoys an actual lineage, as it's produced by a 5th-generation family member (who was also instrumental in getting worldwide legislation banning absinthe relaxed or removed). Lucid is a mass-produced absinthe, who's producer also had a big hand in getting absinthe re-legalized and popular, again. Lucid claims to have replicated an original recipe, as well. It's OK, but pricey.
    3. To skirt the wormwood ban, many distilleries produced faux-sinthe; notably, Herbsaint (Sazerac Co.) and Absente and Grand Absente. The latter two now contain grand wormwood, again.
    4. Similar to "real" gin, absinthe is prepared by steeping a maceration of herbs & c. in a distilled neutral alcohol (usually wheat, iirc). This easy method of production led to some nasty poisonings, though, as bargain-basement producers tried to cash in on l'or vert and bohemianism. See also "bathtub gin."
    5. Absinthe has no psychoactive compounds (other than alcohol). The primary fear about grand wormwood was the result of bad legislation and a very nasty campaign waged by vintners, who at the turn of the century viewed absinthe as a very real threat to their wine profits. A highly publicized multiple homicide was blamed on absinthe, when -in fact- the murderer (Jean Lanfray) had been in the sauce all day long, including much wine and other hard liquor; as far as the press was concerned, it was merely two shots of absinthe that sent him into a drunken rage, killing his pregnant wife and two children.
    6. Thujone is the ketone compound (also a terpene) found in grand wormwood which is blamed for absinthe's psychoactive properties. While thujone is a poison, in reality, there is more thujone in many other foods and food additives than would be present in any responsible consumption of absinthe. For example, the spice, sage, contains thujone, and has always been on the FDA's "generally regarded as safe," list. A recent study found that you would really, really, really have to overdo it to ingest a fatal amount of thujone; you would have died of alcohol poisoning long before the thujone made a dent: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20727933
    7. On Bourbon Street, there's a bar called "Old Absinthe House." You're better off heading to your local Total Wine, unless you just happen to be doing Mardi Gras in NOLA. It's a quaint, nasty little bar in the middle of Bourbon Street, so tourist prices and poor selection. Also, last time I was there, the staff seemed to be completely unaware of how to properly initiate new absinthe drinkers, which was a real disappointment.
    8. In Bohemian days, in France, you would get a bottle of absinthe, a pitcher of cold water, and a glass. You paid for how much you drank out of the bottle of absinthe. Most modern bars that serve absinthe seem to have abandoned this traditional method of consumption for metered servings - which is OK, if they do it right. An absinthe glass has a bubble at the bottom, which (depending on the absinthe) indicates the proper portion of absinthe for you to pour cold water over. This generally works out to be anywhere from a 1:3 to 1:5 ratio.
    9. Loushing is what happens when you pour cold water into the absinthe, and it interacts with the herbal oils to get cloudy neon green (or blue). Yes, not all absinthe is green.
    10. The green color of "real" absinthe comes from the chlorophyll in the macerated herbs. It will bleach out, over time, but still taste great. Some knock-offs do use added food coloring, but they're not worth your time.
    Consider for a moment that there is no meme about brown-haired, brown-eyed step children.

    #2
    Originally posted by submessenger View Post
    Absinthe is one of my favorite drinks. Not just because it tastes great and gets you drunk, but also because it has a really interesting and troubled history. Here's some of the stuff you probably missed:


    1. There's no "real," recipe for absinthe. Many claims have been laid to be the first or best, but it really is about as artisanal as you can get, even though the prime ingredients remain the same. Some recipes are heavier on anise, some on fennel, but grand wormwood (artemisia absinthium) is what makes it absinthe.
    2. Brian Warner (Marilyn Manson, to you plebeians) has his own absinthe recipe, called Mansinthe. It's one of my favorites, very heavy on the fennel. If you're looking for "the realz," though, you should try Kubler - it's as close to an original recipe that is still made, and enjoys an actual lineage, as it's produced by a 5th-generation family member (who was also instrumental in getting worldwide legislation banning absinthe relaxed or removed). Lucid is a mass-produced absinthe, who's producer also had a big hand in getting absinthe re-legalized and popular, again. Lucid claims to have replicated an original recipe, as well. It's OK, but pricey.
    3. To skirt the wormwood ban, many distilleries produced faux-sinthe; notably, Herbsaint (Sazerac Co.) and Absente and Grand Absente. The latter two now contain grand wormwood, again.
    4. Similar to "real" gin, absinthe is prepared by steeping a maceration of herbs & c. in a distilled neutral alcohol (usually wheat, iirc). This easy method of production led to some nasty poisonings, though, as bargain-basement producers tried to cash in on l'or vert and bohemianism. See also "bathtub gin."
    5. Absinthe has no psychoactive compounds (other than alcohol). The primary fear about grand wormwood was the result of bad legislation and a very nasty campaign waged by vintners, who at the turn of the century viewed absinthe as a very real threat to their wine profits. A highly publicized multiple homicide was blamed on absinthe, when -in fact- the murderer (Jean Lanfray) had been in the sauce all day long, including much wine and other hard liquor; as far as the press was concerned, it was merely two shots of absinthe that sent him into a drunken rage, killing his pregnant wife and two children.
    6. Thujone is the ketone compound (also a terpene) found in grand wormwood which is blamed for absinthe's psychoactive properties. While thujone is a poison, in reality, there is more thujone in many other foods and food additives than would be present in any responsible consumption of absinthe. For example, the spice, sage, contains thujone, and has always been on the FDA's "generally regarded as safe," list. A recent study found that you would really, really, really have to overdo it to ingest a fatal amount of thujone; you would have died of alcohol poisoning long before the thujone made a dent: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20727933
    7. On Bourbon Street, there's a bar called "Old Absinthe House." You're better off heading to your local Total Wine, unless you just happen to be doing Mardi Gras in NOLA. It's a quaint, nasty little bar in the middle of Bourbon Street, so tourist prices and poor selection. Also, last time I was there, the staff seemed to be completely unaware of how to properly initiate new absinthe drinkers, which was a real disappointment.
    8. In Bohemian days, in France, you would get a bottle of absinthe, a pitcher of cold water, and a glass. You paid for how much you drank out of the bottle of absinthe. Most modern bars that serve absinthe seem to have abandoned this traditional method of consumption for metered servings - which is OK, if they do it right. An absinthe glass has a bubble at the bottom, which (depending on the absinthe) indicates the proper portion of absinthe for you to pour cold water over. This generally works out to be anywhere from a 1:3 to 1:5 ratio.
    9. Loushing is what happens when you pour cold water into the absinthe, and it interacts with the herbal oils to get cloudy neon green (or blue). Yes, not all absinthe is green.
    10. The green color of "real" absinthe comes from the chlorophyll in the macerated herbs. It will bleach out, over time, but still taste great. Some knock-offs do use added food coloring, but they're not worth your time.
    The Green Fairy will make one do strange things.
    And Tequila makes people's clothes fall off.
    Or so I hear...

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by WFMurphyPhD View Post
      The Green Fairy will make one do strange things.
      And Tequila makes people's clothes fall off.
      Or so I hear...
      Rum earned its nick name with blood. “Fighting juice”

      Absinthe fountains are cool (no it doesnt pour absinthe out of it, it drips water. A contraption made specifically for absinthe drinkers and was common in absinthe bars).

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by WFMurphyPhD View Post
        The Green Fairy will make one do strange things.
        And Tequila makes people's clothes fall off.
        Or so I hear...
        It's my opinion is that, that effect is mainly due to the 100+ proof part of the absinthe equation which causes the naked people.
        Thujone is psychoactive but it is fairly weak. At the highest levels of extraction we could get it wasn't a "great buzz". My thoughts are that it is mainly psychosomatic and a higher than usual proof liquor.

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by BackFistMonkey View Post
          Thujone is psychoactive but it is fairly weak.
          Science disagrees: https://www.sciencedirect.com/scienc...956?via%3Dihub
          Consider for a moment that there is no meme about brown-haired, brown-eyed step children.

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by BackFistMonkey View Post
            My thoughts are that it is mainly psychosomatic and a higher than usual proof liquor.
            ... four five.

            Comment


              #7
              but then again we ain't no extractologists or psychoactitions.

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by BackFistMonkey View Post
                It's my opinion is that, that effect is mainly due to the 100+ proof part of the absinthe equation which causes the naked people.
                Thujone is psychoactive but it is fairly weak. At the highest levels of extraction we could get it wasn't a "great buzz". My thoughts are that it is mainly psychosomatic and a higher than usual proof liquor.
                You are ruining my Conspiracy Theory Man.
                (Say in your best Jeff Bridges, "The Dude" voice).

                Comment


                  #9
                  Now we're having booze lineage wars?
                  "Systema, which means, 'the system'..."

                  Originally posted by strikistanian
                  DROP SEIONAGI MOTHERFUCKER! Except I don't know Judo, so it doesn't work, and he takes my back.
                  Originally posted by Devil
                  Why is it so goddamn hard to find a video of it? I've seen videos I'm pretty sure are alien spacecraft. But still no good Krav.
                  Originally posted by Plasma
                  At the point, I must act! You see my rashguard saids "Jiu Jitsu vs The World" and "The World" was standing in front me teaching Anti-Grappling in a school I help run.
                  Originally posted by SoulMechanic
                  Thank you, not dying really rewarding in more ways than I can express.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by ermghoti View Post
                    Now we're having booze lineage wars?
                    Bourbon FTW (as usual and historically proven).

                    Comment


                      #11
                      I've tried absinthe twice, and enjoyed it a lot. Nice flavor, cool tradition, and the loushe is neat to see. I wish it were more accessible.

                      I'm a bit of a mead maker and have considered making a gallon fermented with absinthe herbs- obviously not an absinthe, but kind of an interesting project. My carboys are all currently occupied making gallons of wedding mead so it'll be a while before I have the materials free.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by Permalost View Post
                        I've tried absinthe twice, and enjoyed it a lot. Nice flavor, cool tradition, and the loushe is neat to see. I wish it were more accessible.

                        I'm a bit of a mead maker and have considered making a gallon fermented with absinthe herbs- obviously not an absinthe, but kind of an interesting project. My carboys are all currently occupied making gallons of wedding mead so it'll be a while before I have the materials free.
                        Curious. Anybody making weed mead? Hell, you have edibles. Drinkables?
                        Carter Hargrave's Jeet Can't Do

                        http://www.bullshido.net/forums/showthread.php?t=31636

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by hungryjoe View Post
                          Curious. Anybody making weed mead? Hell, you have edibles. Drinkables?
                          I have heard tails, but butter/oil/wax processes are more widely known.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by hungryjoe View Post
                            Curious. Anybody making weed mead? Hell, you have edibles. Drinkables?
                            Cannabis oil, while solvent in alcohol, is not soluble in water, so a drink like mead with a good amount of water would not work well. Cannabis infused hard alcohol is a thing, though, called Green Dragon. Also tinctures, which historically have been one of the most popular ways of consuming cannabis, often involve alcohol, although alternative edible solvents are becoming more popular, such as vegetable glycerin and MCT coconut oil (I actually make MCT tincture for a friend's collective as a side hustle).

                            The thing about properly made green dragon is that people think they should take a shot of it when really an eye dropper full is a more appropriate dose. A scientist friend gave me a nice bottle of honey whiskey with some premium buds soaking in it like a worm in tequila. I'd bring it to parties and caution to only take a taste.

                            The longer cannabis sits in alcohol, the more it draws chlorophyll into the alcohol. Chlorophyll has a very bitter taste and is one of the main reasons ethanol is becoming a less common tincture solvent. Even to extract pure cannabis oil, ethanol is less desirable than c02 or butane. Ethanol extraction tends to yield a blackish tarlike extract loaded with chlorophyll (look up Rick Simpson oil for examples) while other methods yield a beautiful orange/yellow extract that's mostly cannabinoids and terpenes. Much more potent and flavorful. These extracts can be redissolved in an edible/drinkable carrier liquid to make the highest quality tinctures (this is what I make).

                            There's also an emerging market for cannabis terpenes/essential oils, which I think would be great for making a cannabis flavored alcohol that's not loaded with chlorophyll or cannabinoids. It would have the taste without getting you high or being illegal- I think it would make for a good business concept. Currently the terpenes are primarily used to reduce viscosity and reintroduce flavors to oil for vape cartridges.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by Permalost View Post
                              Cannabis oil, while solvent in alcohol, is not soluble in water, so a drink like mead with a good amount of water would not work well. Cannabis infused hard alcohol is a thing, though, called Green Dragon. Also tinctures, which historically have been one of the most popular ways of consuming cannabis, often involve alcohol, although alternative edible solvents are becoming more popular, such as vegetable glycerin and MCT coconut oil (I actually make MCT tincture for a friend's collective as a side hustle).

                              The thing about properly made green dragon is that people think they should take a shot of it when really an eye dropper full is a more appropriate dose. A scientist friend gave me a nice bottle of honey whiskey with some premium buds soaking in it like a worm in tequila. I'd bring it to parties and caution to only take a taste.

                              The longer cannabis sits in alcohol, the more it draws chlorophyll into the alcohol. Chlorophyll has a very bitter taste and is one of the main reasons ethanol is becoming a less common tincture solvent. Even to extract pure cannabis oil, ethanol is less desirable than c02 or butane. Ethanol extraction tends to yield a blackish tarlike extract loaded with chlorophyll (look up Rick Simpson oil for examples) while other methods yield a beautiful orange/yellow extract that's mostly cannabinoids and terpenes. Much more potent and flavorful. These extracts can be redissolved in an edible/drinkable carrier liquid to make the highest quality tinctures (this is what I make).

                              There's also an emerging market for cannabis terpenes/essential oils, which I think would be great for making a cannabis flavored alcohol that's not loaded with chlorophyll or cannabinoids. It would have the taste without getting you high or being illegal- I think it would make for a good business concept. Currently the terpenes are primarily used to reduce viscosity and reintroduce flavors to oil for vape cartridges.
                              Jebus

                              In the early 90's I was cutting edge. Haven't partaken in many years and now am impressed with the way things have evolved at the technical level. We have in this state two ballot measures coming up. Medical and recreational. I've mixed feelings.

                              Why is alcohol legal and pot not? I never drove my car into anything or hit anyone in anger after partaking in the herbal. At the same time, I was undoubtedly less productive.

                              I've always thought it was nobody's business what one did at home as long as they were not injurying others. Dope, sex or whatever.

                              Thank you.
                              Carter Hargrave's Jeet Can't Do

                              http://www.bullshido.net/forums/showthread.php?t=31636

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