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  • wetware
    replied
    Originally posted by Mr. Machette View Post
    Can you give me a quick algebra tutorial on this? My brain is making the same mistake as that TI 82.

    6/2(2+1)

    6/2(3)
    3(3)

    3*3 = 9

    What am I missing here? (It looks like you go from 3(3) to 3/3 which tells me there's some principal or basic rule that I've forgotten.)

    Sorry if I sound like a dumb ass. Just trying to avoid a slip into early senility and I haven't done any algebra in at least five years.
    The problem here is the slash and the way it is taught as a synonym for division and fractions. If this doesn't make sense, I'll add some pictures later. Let me know. If you add two fractions, say 1/2 and 3/4 you end up adding them together like this (2+3)/4.
    If you have a horizonal fraction bar the parentheses are implied. Later we learn about the "/" fraction bar and are essentially told it's equivalent to the horizonal bar. Somehow the fact that the implied parentheses don't carry over here gets left out. I know this drove me crazy until someone finally explained it to me a while back, I had definitely learned it the wrong way.

    But here's the problem with the parentheses either explicitly added or left off, as it should be since / is equivalent to divsion and not to a fraction bar.

    6/[2(2+1] = Six over twice the sum of two plus one.
    6/[2(2+1)] = 6/[2(3)] = 6/(2*3) = 6/6 = 1

    Six divided by two multiplied by the sum of two plus one.
    6/2(2+1) = 6/2(3) = 3(3) = 9

    Also, in other news I took the GRE today and by the looks of it I'm going to grad school. Go me.

    Also: Holy crap! Where'd those two extra pages come from. Guess that goes in the glitch pile unless you've all been posting non-stop since I started typing. Unless I acidentally left a tab open for days... if so, my bad.
    Last edited by wetware; 11/13/2012 3:16am, .

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  • W. Rabbit
    replied
    Originally posted by goodlun View Post
    Well here is a reason to get a decent (Top notch) education about computers (not necessarily formal)
    Here is the inside of one of Google's data centers, pretty swanky work environment it is fairly similar to the work environment I we had at ATT ENS although ATT was less colorful.

    http://www.google.com/about/datacent...de/streetview/
    Better pictures here: http://www.slashgear.com/google-data...lery-17252451/

    Leave a comment:


  • goodlun
    replied
    Well here is a reason to get a decent (Top notch) education about computers (not necessarily formal)
    Here is the inside of one of Google's data centers, pretty swanky work environment it is fairly similar to the work environment I we had at ATT ENS although ATT was less colorful.

    http://www.google.com/about/datacent...de/streetview/

    Leave a comment:


  • goodlun
    replied

    http://gigaom.com/cloud/intel-immers...rce=feedburner

    The energy savings are pretty good but data center space is EXPENSIVE horizontal racks are not space efficient. You could oil cool them in a Vertical enclosure but that would present some pretty significant problems. Stack them horizontally?

    Leave a comment:


  • Rivington
    replied
    Let's all use Reverse Polish notation from now on! Think of all the money we'll save on not building = buttons into our calculators!

    Leave a comment:


  • Tranquil Suit
    replied
    goodlun, you and I were on the same boat on this one. Many thanks for providing a definitive answer, Rabbit.


    By the way:


    from same source:
    This question is more about how we deal with trolling and nuisances.
    Read this page: http://knowyourmeme.com/memes/48293
    Then maybe we can start a meta article about identifying and dealing with these threads.
    Between the math forums that I moderate and otherwise frequent, and dozens of other forums
    (a short list is here: http://www.mymathforum.com/viewtopic...p=79150#p79150),
    I'd guess that thousands of hours have been wasted on this garbage.
    An A-class trolljob. I took it hook, line and sinker.
    Last edited by Tranquil Suit; 11/09/2012 2:12am, .

    Leave a comment:


  • King Sleepless
    replied
    Originally posted by goodlun View Post
    You should tell that to Professor Carlos De La Lama
    http://www.ratemyprofessors.com/Show...jsp?tid=113955
    Fuck Professors like that. They're just pissed because none of their peers think they are as clever as they think they are.

    Leave a comment:


  • W. Rabbit
    replied

    Leave a comment:


  • goodlun
    replied
    Originally posted by Dr. Sleepless View Post
    You don't purposefully create confusion in a math problem unless you're TRYING to set someone up to fail.
    You should tell that to Professor Carlos De La Lama
    http://www.ratemyprofessors.com/Show...jsp?tid=113955

    Leave a comment:


  • King Sleepless
    replied
    Originally posted by Tranquil Suit View Post
    Captain Obvious to the rescue.



    I'm gonna go outside and cut down a tree... with my teeth.
    I'm sorry, I was just tired of you guys going back an forth trying to waggle your dicks.

    Leave a comment:


  • W. Rabbit
    replied
    Some college...no longer attending UCLA.
    \
    -\

    Leave a comment:


  • Tranquil Suit
    replied
    Originally posted by Dr. Sleepless View Post
    God damn it you faggots.

    It's neither. The answer is, "Take this back and write it more clearly and stop being a lazy piece of shit."

    You don't purposefully create confusion in a math problem unless you're TRYING to set someone up to fail. Math is about writing the language that the universe is understood by. You don't do that by purposefully miscommunicating problems. That just creates new sets of problems and then nobody gets anything done.
    Captain Obvious to the rescue.



    I'm gonna go outside and cut down a tree... with my teeth.

    Leave a comment:


  • King Sleepless
    replied
    God damn it you faggots.

    It's neither. The answer is, "Take this back and write it more clearly and stop being a lazy piece of shit."

    You don't purposefully create confusion in a math problem unless you're TRYING to set someone up to fail. Math is about writing the language that the universe is understood by. You don't do that by purposefully miscommunicating problems. That just creates new sets of problems and then nobody gets anything done.

    Leave a comment:


  • W. Rabbit
    replied
    Aha I knew you'd find it Good. This is a classic computer science problem in algorithms.

    Originally posted by Tranquil Suit View Post
    So I remain convinced that this has been the universal rule since... a while. If there is a contradicting source (that's not about calculators), please tell me.
    The issue is the use of juxtaposition in writing formula and it's a very old problem.

    It's not so much a calculator thing as a computer algorithm thing....how do you make a computer do exactly what you meant?

    Answer: parenthesis.

    http://math.stackexchange.com/questi...-juxtaposition

    And the answer is, DON'T WRITE a/bc, because it will only cause confusion. Some people/software/whatever will make one interpretation, some will make the other, neither one has been endorsed by the Dalai Lama or any other great leader. Put in enough parentheses to make your writing foolproof.
    Last edited by W. Rabbit; 11/09/2012 1:45am, .

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  • goodlun
    replied
    Originally posted by Tranquil Suit View Post
    Actually Purple Math page 2
    http://www.purplemath.com/modules/orderops2.htm


    This next example displays an issue that almost never arises but, when it does, there seems to be no end to the arguing.
    • Simplify.
      • (**)
        = 4 + 1

        =
        5

    The confusing part in the above calculation is how "16 divided by 2[2] + 1" (in the line marked with the double-star) becomes "16 divided by 4 + 1", instead of "8 times by 2 + 1". That's because, even though multiplication and division are at the same level (so the left-to-right rule should apply), parentheses outrank division, so the first 2 goes with the [2], rather than with the "16 divided by". That is, multiplication that is indicated by placement against parentheses (or brackets, etc) is "stronger" than "regular" multiplication. Typesetting the entire problem in a graphing calculator verifies this hierarchy:


    Note that different software will process this differently

    Leave a comment:

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