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  • itwasntme
    replied
    Originally posted by Permalost View Post
    I think they were doing the same.

    They're posting articles, pictures, personal anecdotes while you sling lame insults, and they're the ones not contributing?

    Your dumb posts. Honestly I like the gaijin rolls but I'm not gonna tell a bunch of sushi connoiseurs that they're wrong and I'm right.
    All I've seen them do is try and make people see them with an air of sophistication for the class of raw fish they eat.

    They contributing to something, yes, but not the thread I started.

    I never said their opinions on what sushi is good, is wrong. I simply stated this is a thread about maki and that idc about getting a cultural experience from my raw fish. If you had read from the beginning you would know that, unless you have some sort of learning disability.

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  • itwasntme
    replied
    Originally posted by ChenPengFi View Post
    You missed the nuance, as i explained before.
    You ignored the advice to get more educated as not "productive".
    The "purists" you speak of don't exist here, that is your diversion.
    That you do not have the personal experience to appreciate what some of us do, does not invalidate our experiences.
    You haven't even tried roe? Wtf? It's probably in some of those rolls you're so fond of.
    You're just to ignorant to recognize it.
    Ok so you've had Japanese fast food. Great.
    So now you want to preach to people who eat great Japanese food all the time.
    You're an idiot.
    Ftr i've been to our local auction, from both sides of the equation.
    Idc enough about what anyone has to say to even think about the "subtle nuance" in their posts. This is a post about maki, it's not that serious, I promise.

    And what exactly would you have me become more educated on?

    Ok, you may not be a purist, but that doesn't take away from the fact that you're a pompous douche that believes if people don't think the way you do, they're wrong/ignorant/what have you.

    I never tried to invalidate your experiences. See above.

    If you actually read any of my posts, you'd see I only eat spicy tuna maki, I went out on a limb yesterday ordering something new. The only ignorance I see here is the fact you used the word "to" to describe something in excess.

    The only things I've preached about are that I, personally, do not feel the need to get a cultural experience from my sushi and the fact that it's derived from another nation. Nothing else.

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  • ChenPengFi
    replied
    ...and to continue.

    Another favorite of mine is moi, or threadfin.


    This very delicate and light fleshed fish has been farmed in Hawai'i since ancient times.
    It was one of the fishes designated as "kapu" or forbidden for the "Maka'ainana" or common folk of the land.
    Only the "Ali'i" or royalty were allowed to consume the moi.

    Thankfully today it's ok for everyone.
    The whole being strapped to a coconut tree and beaten with a shark-toothed club thing...

    Seared, it makes a nice nigiri.




    It makes for a nice sashimi presentation too.

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  • Permalost
    replied
    Originally posted by jwilde88 View Post
    No I was keeping the ball rolling in hopes somebody would have something, ANYTHING, intelligent to say to prove their point.
    I think they were doing the same.
    But I guess that's the quality of conversation you can expect from people that read articles on fish vendors/auctions.
    They're posting articles, pictures, personal anecdotes while you sling lame insults, and they're the ones not contributing?
    So what, may I ask, made you decide to jump on the dick riding bandwagon?
    Your dumb posts. Honestly I like the gaijin rolls but I'm not gonna tell a bunch of sushi connoiseurs that they're wrong and I'm right.

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  • ChenPengFi
    replied
    You missed the nuance, as i explained before.
    You ignored the advice to get more educated as not "productive".
    The "purists" you speak of don't exist here, that is your diversion.
    That you do not have the personal experience to appreciate what some of us do, does not invalidate our experiences.
    You haven't even tried roe? Wtf? It's probably in some of those rolls you're so fond of.
    You're just to ignorant to recognize it.
    Ok so you've had Japanese fast food. Great.
    So now you want to preach to people who eat great Japanese food all the time.
    You're an idiot.
    Ftr i've been to our local auction, from both sides of the equation.

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  • itwasntme
    replied
    Originally posted by Permalost View Post
    I thought your "Whatever, you guys are just snobs, neener neener" was your admittance of defeat.
    No I was keeping the ball rolling in hopes somebody would have something, ANYTHING, intelligent to say to prove their point. But I guess that's the quality of conversation you can expect from people that read articles on fish vendors/auctions. So what, may I ask, made you decide to jump on the dick riding bandwagon?

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  • Permalost
    replied
    Originally posted by jwilde88 View Post
    Yes, this is an acceptable form of admittance of defeat, and yes, I do accept.
    I thought your "Whatever, you guys are just snobs, neener neener" was your admittance of defeat.

    Leave a comment:


  • ChenPengFi
    replied
    Honolulu has it's own auction and while much, much smaller it's patterned after the Tsukiji market.
    http://www.hawaii-seafood.org/auction/







    Of course my favorite way to eat raw fish is right out of the water.
    When we go deep-sea fishing the first stop is usually a FAD buoy.
    http://www.hawaii.edu/HIMB/FADS/FADFAQ.html
    There we use smaller gear to catch what will be later used for bait.
    Often mahimahi (dorado) and ono (wahoo) etc are found there as well.
    The juvenile tuna can be rigged to swim live:

    (That's the first vid that came up, it's not that great. His rig is pretty simple and the fish go to sleep if you turn them upside down; way safer)

    Out of the "bait fish", you'll get an occasional shibi, or (in Hawai'i specifically) juvenile yellowfin.
    These make awesome sashimi!
    I'll cut 'em up on deck while the meat is still quivering.
    Supah ono brah!!!

    The thing about tuna is that they are really strong fish.
    My dad used to say they fight with their entire heart.
    Some are even considered warm-blooded.
    When a big tuna hits it goes straight for Atlantis; none of the showy jumping and fanfare the billfish are known for.
    When it gets as deep as it can it just circles. The you begin the arduous process of hauling it up to the surface. Then when it gets close to the surface it tries to do it all over again, stripping line off of the reel in a scream.
    In fact the Hawai'ian word for yellowfin, ahi, also means fire, as the lines would ignite flames on the sides of the boat when the fish took off.
    A 150 lb ahi is more work than a 400lb marlin.
    The problem is tuna meat "burns", that is if you don't get it in the boat and on ice fast the fish is worthless. (Thus my dad's comment.)
    That's why you'll see the little slips cut out of the tails of the tuna at the market, to inspect not only the fat content but also how well the fish was treated once it was caught.

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  • ChenPengFi
    replied
    Sushi Red herring....
    Hahahahaaaa!

    Leave a comment:


  • itwasntme
    replied
    Originally posted by jubei33 View Post
    Tsukiji fish market

    There are many fish markets in Japan, however, in central Tokyo lies the largest wholesale fish market in the world. The Tsukiji Wholesale Fish Market is a exciting tourist attraction and working destination for fishermen and culinary elites of the highest caliber. The market sells over 400 different kinds of seafood and a total yearly volume of 700,000 tons. Casual estimations of the value of the food set it at approximately 5.5 billion dollars/yr. This is probably modest, as the value of some of the foods it specializes in fluctuate.

    If you feel like getting up at ~5 am you can attend the fish auctions between 5-6am, which I'm told are quite exciting to watch. I have never done this, but since it is a source of national pride for Japan, videos are often shown on TV and you can view them on you tube as well. Be advised that only 140 lucky people are admitted daily to these events on a first come, first serve basis and people really do come very early to get their spot.





    As an aside, I feel it's also important to note that the market has often been closed to the public at large due to "Fork lift faux pas." Visitors have often been seen riding some of the forklifts, playing with the knives, kissing the fish and other stupid shit. Please don't do any of these if you decide to come.

    For regular folks who have no intention of buying a 100 lbs. of fish, the real action starts just outside of the market proper. In the outer market lies dozens of small restaurants, cutlery shops, fruit and vegetable stores and sushi stands. Quite a few of these have been family owned for many generations. Sushi aside there are restaurants that make donburi, grilled, broiled and fried fish treats of many kinds sure to delight the most discriminating guests. Due to the early hours of the market, most of these places tend to close around 2 or 3pm.

    This can be reached by the Oedo subway line at Tsukijishijyo, or by using the Tokyo Metro Hibiya line at Tsukiji station. Hibiya line is the difference between a 10 minute walk. Here is a link to a map of subway/train lines.
    Yes, this is an acceptable form of admittance of defeat, and yes, I do accept.

    Leave a comment:


  • jubei33
    replied
    Tsukiji fish market

    There are many fish markets in Japan, however, in central Tokyo lies the largest wholesale fish market in the world. The Tsukiji Wholesale Fish Market is a exciting tourist attraction and working destination for fishermen and culinary elites of the highest caliber. The market sells over 400 different kinds of seafood and a total yearly volume of 700,000 tons. Casual estimations of the value of the food set it at approximately 5.5 billion dollars/yr. This is probably modest, as the value of some of the foods it specializes in fluctuate.

    If you feel like getting up at ~5 am you can attend the fish auctions between 5-6am, which I'm told are quite exciting to watch. I have never done this, but since it is a source of national pride for Japan, videos are often shown on TV and you can view them on you tube as well. Be advised that only 140 lucky people are admitted daily to these events on a first come, first serve basis and people really do come very early to get their spot.





    As an aside, I feel it's also important to note that the market has often been closed to the public at large due to "Fork lift faux pas." Visitors have often been seen riding some of the forklifts, playing with the knives, kissing the fish and other stupid shit. Please don't do any of these if you decide to come.

    For regular folks who have no intention of buying a 100 lbs. of fish, the real action starts just outside of the market proper. In the outer market lies dozens of small restaurants, cutlery shops, fruit and vegetable stores and sushi stands. Quite a few of these have been family owned for many generations. Sushi aside there are restaurants that make donburi, grilled, broiled and fried fish treats of many kinds sure to delight the most discriminating guests. Due to the early hours of the market, most of these places tend to close around 2 or 3pm.

    This can be reached by the Oedo subway line at Tsukijishijyo, or by using the Tokyo Metro Hibiya line at Tsukiji station. Hibiya line is the difference between a 10 minute walk. Here is a link to a map of subway/train lines.




    Originally posted by jwilde88 View Post
    Sushi Red herring....

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  • itwasntme
    replied
    @jubei: I sincerely hope you realize that your argument on how we can keep predating the origins of sushi only makes my argument that "sushi puritanism" is ridiculous only stronger. You probably don't, though, since most intellectual types lack any real common sense.

    On another note, the sushi in the picture was a spicy salmon roll and a roll specific to that restaurant (I forgot the name of the roll). It was all excellent. The aforementioned nameless roll I believe had either spicy tuna or salmon in the roll, and on top avocado, another fish (yes, I forgot the name of the second fish also), and tobiko. If you have any further questions, as I know I've forgotten some you already asked, then ask away... Or again.

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  • ChenPengFi
    replied

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  • Res Judicata
    replied
    I've never gotten the wagyu, sadly, but the Chef's special menu is definitely worth the bump in price. I haven't been there in a couple of years, but I once had a lobster and uni dish from that menu that was simply unreal. The monkfish liver pate/tofu appetizer is great, too.

    Kobe beef is awesome. Expensive, though.

    Dammit, I'm making myself hungry.

    Leave a comment:


  • jubei33
    replied
    Originally posted by Diesel_tke View Post
    I lived in Okinawa for 4 years. And loved eating sushi and sushimi over there. I don't like the sushimi over here(the states) as much.

    My wife is an Epidimiologist, and she has now made me paranoid as hell about eating raw food. However, the oyster-fest was awesome this weekend!!!
    Yeah, I hear you about the difference, it's the freshness that makes the difference.

    Reading all the illnesses can be scary, but really these are kind of the rarity. If you're going to get sick, its not usually going to be one of those rare diseases no one hears about, its just going to be from a more successful bacteria, like ordinary salmonella or regular old Noro virus (etc). These pass in a day or two. I look at it like, well, Unlucky.


    Originally posted by Ming loyalist
    after reading his posts i'm pretty sure that the OP has been getting exactly the quality of sushi that he deserves.
    Hah! Time will tell.

    Originally posted by Res Judicata
    And if we're talking about Japanese food in general, my favorite place in NYC is Sugiyama. http://www.sugiyama-nyc.com/ It's not a sushi place, though. It's a kaiseki-style restaurant. One of the courses will be sashimi, naturally. Bring your appetite and plenty of time.
    The regular dishes seem reasonably priced for NYC. Can you tell me if their wagyu is worth 200$?

    Not on sushi, but we go to Kobe once in a while and they have this famous steak that's good. Its different to both American steak in both cut portion and fat content, etc. For Japanese beef the fat 'marbelization'(?) is important.



    (not pics of the steak in question, but of what I mean.)


    Originally posted by jwilde
    Edit: I hope this doesn't give you all a fucking heart attack. It was so goddamn delicious I almost had one!
    1. Dude, where did you eat that? Is it good sushi? What's in it? What makes it so good? what kind of restaurant made it? etc..

    2. "sushi is something the Japanese got from the Chinese means of preserving raw fish in vinegar rice."
    You keep saying that, like they are the same thing and it makes a difference to the sushi you eat today. However, why not, say Indonesian fermented fish culture? why not of the Yup'ik? And if we're going to do a superficial timeline to establish authenticity why not south eastern asia in general? Many cultures have traditional fermented fish dishes that bear a similarity to early namezushi, which comes from rice culture and that fermentation is one of the oldest processes used for preserving food. However, this is different from the 'got there first' idea you brought up.

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