Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Magic Bullet

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Magic Bullet

    I'd never really thought about the 'magic bullet' idea until I saw it on MythBusters years ago. Unsurprisingly bullets made of frozen water or meat don't work. They melt or vaporize probably before they even reach the end of the barrel, and even if they didn't, shot from a pneumatic gun, they simply don't have the mass to kill.

    Sure, if you could pneumatically fire a meat bullet at Mach 10, somehow not thawing from the intense atmospheric fiction, it would work. But you can't.

    A couple of months ago I thought about the whole disappearing bullet idea again, and I think I might've--probably have--solved it. The problem needs to be looked at another way. It doesn't matter if the bullet material disappears, only that the bullet can't be traced to a specific gun. Clearly if someone has a bullet wound, but the bullet that hit them can't be found, they were still shot. Even an idiot forensic pathologist should be able to determine that. So it doesn't matter if trace evidence of the bullet material remains, only that it's no longer in the shape of a bullet.

    My magic bullet would have a mass comparable to a slug of heavy metal, but would melt at human body temperature. I know just how one could be made, it's not some hypothetical science fiction.

    Point of the thread, is this worth patenting? I don't imagine it would be a real money-maker. And most of the people who'd want such a thing probably shouldn't have access to it. What ethical use is there for this?

    #2
    Homeland Security will be along shortly to detain you. Stay at home with your doors unlocked.

    Comment


      #3
      So, the only application of this I can see is that the projectile can't be traced back to a specific firearm, am I right?

      In that case, don't you think requiring a specially manufactured, more than likely totally unique gun to fire this thing defeats the fucking point?

      Comment


        #4

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by Lu Tze View Post
          So, the only application of this I can see is that the projectile can't be traced back to a specific firearm, am I right?

          In that case, don't you think requiring a specially manufactured, more than likely totally unique gun to fire this thing defeats the fucking point?
          Years ago I read an article about a high velocity .223 that would do a lot of damage when it hit the target because the bullet would basically just disintegrate on impact. I seem to remember that they tried to use it in Viet Nam but if the bullet hit high grass or leaves etc., it would never get to the target. It's been years since I read the article but ammunition that would self destruct on impact would not need any kind of special weapon firing it. I think they have developed ammunition tipped with explosives that does major damage to the target as well. The little that would remain of that ammo would be hard to trace to the weapon. The scarcity of that type of ammo and the people who have access to it would likely make the ammo easy to trace.

          Comment


            #6
            Lasers. The only answer is bullets made of lasers.

            Ideally really slow, lazy lasers that never seem to fire straight out of the barrel, which will be perfect for my white-armor clad super soldiers.

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by Johnny Y. View Post
              The problem needs to be looked at another way. It doesn't matter if the bullet material disappears, only that the bullet can't be traced to a specific gun.
              I usually just get rid of the barrel and brass. Salt water + time really destroys the rifling. So do your work, then go night fishing off a pier. Nobody will notice you kicking a gun barrel off the pier, or you can tell them it was just pliers.

              Comment


                #8
                Would the heat generated by tracer rounds destroy the signature of a bullet?

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by Johnny Y. View Post
                  Point of the thread, is this worth patenting?
                  You're pretty late to the party Johnny. The CIA have had untraceable bullets for decades, how else do you think they were able to kill Marilyn Monroe and make it look like an OD.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by Johnny Y. View Post
                    My magic bullet would have a mass comparable to a slug of heavy metal, but would melt at human body temperature. I know just how one could be made, it's not some hypothetical science fiction.
                    Melt into what, liquid magic bullet?

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by Johnny Y. View Post
                      My magic bullet would have a mass comparable to a slug of heavy metal, but would melt at human body temperature. I know just how one could be made, it's not some hypothetical science fiction.
                      Your idea is actually pretty much science fiction due to the fact that the gunpowder from the initial firing of a bullet causes much more heat than the human body and elements that melt at body temperature are incredibly weak and malleable making for very poor bullets. Not to mention that you're going to find trace amounts of the substance in the wound.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        The solution is simple.......Chi bullets. Only to be used when your target's toes are not crossed.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Would frangible rounds like this retain rifling marks for later forensic analysis?

                          Nevermind, it's better I don't know.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by P Marsh View Post
                            Your idea is actually pretty much science fiction due to the fact that the gunpowder from the initial firing of a bullet causes much more heat than the human body and elements that melt at body temperature are incredibly weak and malleable making for very poor bullets. Not to mention that you're going to find trace amounts of the substance in the wound.
                            You're correct, they wouldn't be fired from a gunpowder cartridge. Pneumatic gun. Not nearly as powerful, but supersonic magic bullets aren't possible because even Mach 2 air friction would melt them.

                            It might be possible to construct a cartridge with enough insulating wadding to separate the bullet from the heat of the explosion. Though if it could outrace the flame of the muzzle blast at the end, I don't know. But that fraction of a second of hot gas probably wouldn't be enough to affect it very much anyway; people wave their fingers through candle flames without burns.

                            As my OP says, it doesn't matter if the substance of the bullet remains, only that it can't be traced to a specific gun.

                            You are not correct about the materials. I'd say how to do it, but then that'd void the point of getting a patent.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              It's a lot simpler to just stab a man with an icicle.

                              Comment

                              Collapse

                              Edit this module to specify a template to display.

                              Working...
                              X