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    relaxing while striking

    Following is a quote from White Shark from another thread:

    "The key to relaxing in all athletic endeavors is relaxing your jaw(don't clinch your teeth) and breathing deeply/slowly from the stomach. Both of these things automatically relax you. Try and remember them during Randori and you will notice yourself relaxing and having more energy."

    This brings up to questions. I have started a separate thread because I am interested in relaxing during striking (particularly boxing) as opposed to Judo.

    1) When you get hit in the head, is it better to have your teeth clenched or not? (I took a wallop in December; my jaw was unclenched and it still hurts.)

    2) How do you control your breathing in the heat of battle?
    (When I am throwing and receiving alot of punches, I tend to gas.)
    The vast Universe!
    The Way of Aiki to to become
    The light of all mankind
    Opening all the world

    --O Sensei

    :gaygay:

    #2
    "How do you control your breathing in the heat of battle?"

    Short, sharp breathes, like a dog panting is one method. Try doing your exercises with all types of breathing patterns, or even occasionally holding the breath. You'll soon start to figure out the best methods that work under pressure.

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      #3
      I think you should definitely keep your teeth clinched when trading blows. If you get hit with a solid hook when your mouth is wide open, it could leave you with an expensive dentist bill.

      Also, I tend to ki-ai when I'm gassed. People may look at you funny, but I've found that it helps my breathing.

      Comment


        #4
        I got a great mouthguard made by a dentist, it fits perfectly so my jaw is not slack, but I don't have to clench or even think about keeping it in. As for breathing, I always exhale sharply in a little breath when I hit. If I am tired, it's more of a grunt of effort. I don't really care what it sounds like, it's not a Karate fashion show, sometimes it even sets your opponent on edge a bit. If I am making noise, I don't feel as tired for some reason.

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          #5
          Clenching your jaw on a hit is a good idea. A mouthguard is an even better idea.

          As far as breathing, i let it go more naturally. you breathe hard for two reasons, either your body needs the oxygen or you are nervous. If you are nervous, that's more in your head and you have to address that however you can. If you need oxygen, trying to slow the intake isn't a good idea. If you need to breathe hard to get going, breathe hard. Ultimately, with better cardio, the amount of output required to get to the stage of "gased" needs to be that much more higher. So the solution is more like...relax...improve your cardio...learn to pace yourself...improve your cardio.
          Punches in bunches and kicks kicks kicks!

          Comment


            #6
            Re: relaxing while striking

            Originally posted by garbanzo

            White Shark from another thread:

            "The key to relaxing in all athletic endeavors is relaxing your jaw(don't clinch your teeth) and breathing deeply/slowly from the stomach. Both of these things automatically relax you."

            **
            Both of these things aso require practice, and use.

            If what you are trying to do is relax. . .relax. Then, duplicate that level of relaxation while doing an activity (biking, running, hitting a bag, light sparring, etc.). Building uo to using this technique when fighting.




            **
            This brings up to questions. I am interested in relaxing during striking (particularly boxing).

            1) When you get hit in the head, is it better to have your teeth clenched or not? (I took a wallop in December; my jaw was unclenched and it still hurts.)

            **
            Everyone who responded chose to clench. If your teeth are clenched, you are not relaxed. What is your goal?

            Any fighter taking a wallop to the jaw (clenched or unclenched) will feel it, if he never learns to "roll" with the punch. Muhammad Ali was the most relaed fighter of our time. . .as are the Gracies, relaxed fighters.



            **
            2) How do you control your breathing in the heat of battle?

            What type of control are you looking for? Most fighters tend to hold their breath when actively engaged. . .hence the boxer's need to "catch their breath" between rounds. No matter all their cardio training to the contrary, they hold it.

            [anyone out there don't think so? why do you feel the need to exhale/kiai/force out a breath while striking? You're holding your breath.]

            Try breathing normally. Now, do an actuivity and breath normally. Now, spar, and breath normally. and so on, and so on. . .in and out. . .hit the bag, run, fight. . .in and out. . .

            Most fights last a matter of seconds. Often one participant is out of gas. . .same with lifting weights. . .at the heavier weights, lifters tend to hold their breath, attempting to push the weight up, possibly to stabilize their core/trunk area. . .breathing through
            the lift works.


            [/B]
            sigpic

            Comment


              #7
              "What type of control are you looking for? "

              Very specifically: I am looking to be able to go three rounds of boxing with one minute breaks and not lose my breath and not get my ass kicked, as has happened in the past.
              The vast Universe!
              The Way of Aiki to to become
              The light of all mankind
              Opening all the world

              --O Sensei

              :gaygay:

              Comment


                #8
                You wanna see relaxed boxers:
                Ali
                Jones jr
                Hopkins
                to name only a few.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by garbanzo
                  "What type of control are you looking for? "

                  Very specifically: I am looking to be able to go three rounds of boxing with one minute breaks and not lose my breath and not get my ass kicked, as has happened in the past.

                  Try to breathe the way I mentioned earlier. . .your focus should be in pushing your breath "down" lower in your body. . .do not "chest breathe" as with those short raspy intakes of air.

                  Extending your lungs to full capacity goes a long way toward getting rid of the lactic acid buildup that freezes muscles in use.

                  I regularly used to spar (full and 3/4 speed with multiple opponents) continuously for an hour and a half.

                  The only hard rule is to not stop breathing. . .always have air moving, whether in, or out, but moving.


                  If you do cardio exercises, ty to remember the feeling. . .and duplicate it while hitting the bags (speed, heavy, double ended, etc.) .

                  Then try sprarring that way.
                  Good luck.

                  (PS, I've noticed boxing coached don't like thier boxers doing this, alhough many fighters find it helpful. Of course if the boxers could translate the cardio training to a fight, they wouldn't be looking.)
                  sigpic

                  Comment


                    #10
                    That's sort of what I had in mind.

                    I may have coordination issues.
                    The vast Universe!
                    The Way of Aiki to to become
                    The light of all mankind
                    Opening all the world

                    --O Sensei

                    :gaygay:

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by Meex

                      I regularly used to spar (full and 3/4 speed with multiple opponents) continuously for an hour and a half.

                      The only hard rule is to not stop breathing. . .always have air moving, whether in, or out, but moving.


                      If you do cardio exercises, ty to remember the feeling. . .and duplicate it while hitting the bags (speed, heavy, double ended, etc.) .

                      Then try sprarring that way.
                      Good luck.

                      (PS, I've noticed boxing coached don't like thier boxers doing this, alhough many fighters find it helpful. Of course if the boxers could translate the cardio training to a fight, they wouldn't be looking.)
                      Wow, I can hardly go 10 min non stop if I am hitting full speed and full force.
                      That is amazing.
                      And since the semi-pro's and pro boxers I know, CAN'T do it either, you shoudl consider going pro.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        I can't do anything non-stop for 10 minutes.
                        The vast Universe!
                        The Way of Aiki to to become
                        The light of all mankind
                        Opening all the world

                        --O Sensei

                        :gaygay:

                        Comment


                          #13
                          I've always been taught to keep my teeth lightly together and breathe only through the nose. This is exactly what you'd be doing with a good mouthguard anyway.

                          IMO, keeping your jaw relaxed is related to keeping your neck relaxed--something that you need if you're going to take some of the energy off of punches that do connect.

                          You're also going to have to learn to relax (whether it's keeping your shoulders down or your legs loose) whenever you don't actually require muscular tension. If you're tense, being aware of this can increase your endurance substantially.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by ronin69
                            Wow, I can hardly go 10 min non stop if I am hitting full speed and full force.
                            That is amazing.
                            And since the semi-pro's and pro boxers I know, CAN'T do it either, you shoudl consider going pro.
                            It may be that I'm strange? Anyway, it used to irritate the hell out of people. . .I would talk to them while we were sparring, coaching, and getting them to look for certain weaknesses, etc.

                            I don't think I'd ever gone "full force" during any of this. . .as i said, it was sparring. Besides, what I hit full force didn't usually get up. Not nice to do to sparring partners, or students.

                            **
                            I know boxers (golden glove level to pro) that can run & jump rope all day that can't hoop (play some basketball) for an hour.

                            **
                            I look at what I can do as application of training, and not that hard to do.

                            Ever fought for 20 minutes?
                            5 3-minute rounds with 1 minute in between?

                            Do it enough times, and you can.


                            later.
                            sigpic

                            Comment


                              #15
                              breath in through the nose, exhale through the mouth. keeping the teeth lightly together. tension anywhere will result in stiffness and rigidity of the muscles, causing them to work slowly. punches will be hard but slower than if relaxed. dont confuse power with tension they are different.
                              breath slow and deep and try to perform several techniques to one breath. This will cut out any "dead time" between the moves, like a block and counter punch. However both should be delivered at the same time eventually.
                              short sharp breaths will cause you to hyper ventilate and feel dizzy, not a good practice at all...?

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