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How does homeopathy work?

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  • yottabit
    replied
    James Randi give the explanation why homeopathy is a scam and profit on desperate people.

    YouTube - James Randi explains homeopathy

    Leave a comment:


  • Blackbelt737
    replied
    Originally posted by greatheight View Post
    According to Homeopathy, wouldn't that be the cure for pregnancy? Just sayin...
    ha, nice.

    nice article and vid tideliar. I took a class called science and psuedoscience last year and i wish i would have known about the video so i could have brought it up for class. I'm a senior pre-med so this whole thread has been great but i'm pretty disgusted to find out that the government in the uk actually supports this kind of bs. :BangHead:

    Leave a comment:


  • King Sleepless
    replied
    Here's a good litmus test. We'll break someone's leg and cut them in an artery, we'll see which kind of medicine saves the patient.

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  • Lu Tze
    replied
    Originally posted by radshop View Post
    He had reams of evidence to back up his claim.
    Where is it then?

    Or are you saying this friend of yours is just sitting on this ground breaking, paradigm shattering, potential Nobel fucking prize winning research... as opposed to, oh I don't know, publishing it?

    Leave a comment:


  • Permalost
    replied
    Originally posted by radshop View Post
    I still think you are missing the point - except W. Rabbit who actually made a legitimate attempt. Consider this. My first exposure to homeopathy was about 10 years ago - I met a guy who has a Masters in Biochem from Stanford, had worked as biochemist in industry for over 10 years and left to become a naturopathic/homeopathic doctor and went back to school for 3 years getting certified and licensed in California to practice. He recommended homeopathy to me and claimed that it really works based on his (at that time) over 5 years of clinical practice. He had reams of evidence to back up his claim.
    Well, I did my own research and found that there are indeed other bright, educated people who believe in homeopathy and who are convinced that water has a special memory property under certain conditions. I'm not convinced by their arguments, but I think the level of argumentation on this thread is mostly an amateur circle-jerk.
    When you claim to know something is false, and are confronted with your own lack of evidence for that claim, your have no standing to cry "argument from ignorance." Back up your claim.
    Water doesn't have appreciable "memory" the way they say it does. It doesn't. Is a more in depth answer really necessary?

    Leave a comment:


  • helmutlvx
    replied
    Originally posted by Chili Pepper View Post
    The plural of anecdote is not "data".
    Oh, that's so awesome.

    I'm also fully supportive of the bleach test.

    Leave a comment:


  • tideliar
    replied
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gZO9J7dDLU4

    This is new from the Ten23 guys. Homeopathic vodka! A healthy hangover cure!

    Apparently the BBC were going to make a show about the campaign and homeopathy but dropped it after filming a bunch of footage. They finally got the footage off BBC Scotland and edited this together.

    The guy making the vodka and doing most of the talking is Michael Marshall, the founder of Ten23.

    Leave a comment:


  • Chili Pepper
    replied
    Originally posted by radshop View Post
    Well, I did my own research and found that there are indeed other bright, educated people who believe in homeopathy and who are convinced that water has a special memory property under certain conditions.
    The plural of anecdote is not "data".

    When you claim to know something is false, and are confronted with your own lack of evidence for that claim, your have no standing to cry "argument from ignorance." Back up your claim.
    Okay, how about we both back up our claims? It really isn't that hard to do - simply and unequivocally.
    - We'll take a nice tall glass of bleach.
    - I will use an eyedropper and a bathtub, and make a homeopathic solution of bleach.
    - You will drink the glass of bleach, and I'll drink a glass of my super-potent homeopathic mega bleach water. Hell, just to show what a good sport I am, I'll even drink first.
    - If homeopathy works, you get to sit next to me in the ambulance and tell me "I told you so."

    Leave a comment:


  • Eddie Hardon
    replied
    Originally posted by meataxe View Post
    I found a great site that explains things clearly for me:

    http://www.howdoeshomeopathywork.com/

    I hope that this may be enlightening for you...
    Well done you - it caught me out as well. HaHa.

    By chance, I've been reading Dr Ben Goldacre's "Bad Science" book, which neatly skewers Homeopathy and more. I'm half way through the Placebo Effect at the moment and it's an eye-opener.

    ISBN 978-0-00-728487-0. Apparently it's also available here www.bookarmy.com but I haven't had time to look.

    Dr Goldacre's Website: http://www.badscience.net/

    The Homeo article also alluded to the Memory of Water. That always baffled me for the simple reason that the processing of sewege into potable water cannot support such a belief. In that vein, the Homeo water based solution is infinitely more pure than the potable water sourced from sewage.

    Anyway, enjoy the book and the website.

    *The Placebo Effect - Good Lord, sham surgery, salted water injections, pink medicine pills and they all effing work!!. Ah, the mystery of the Mind-Body nexus.:icon_wink

    Leave a comment:


  • alex
    replied
    Originally posted by radshop View Post
    I still think you are missing the point - except W. Rabbit who actually made a legitimate attempt. Consider this. My first exposure to homeopathy was about 10 years ago - I met a guy who has a Masters in Biochem from Stanford, had worked as biochemist in industry for over 10 years and left to become a naturopathic/homeopathic doctor and went back to school for 3 years getting certified and licensed in California to practice. He recommended homeopathy to me and claimed that it really works based on his (at that time) over 5 years of clinical practice. He had reams of evidence to back up his claim.
    Well, I did my own research and found that there are indeed other bright, educated people who believe in homeopathy and who are convinced that water has a special memory property under certain conditions. I'm not convinced by their arguments, but I think the level of argumentation on this thread is mostly an amateur circle-jerk.
    When you claim to know something is false, and are confronted with your own lack of evidence for that claim, your have no standing to cry "argument from ignorance." Back up your claim.
    my girlfriend is an A+ student, about to get first class honours in engineering science (thats engineering with loooong equations about flows and shit) at the best uni in the country, and a uni thats in the top 50 in the world. no mean feat for a tiny pissant country like NZ. shes doing her masters next year. me and my dad once convinced her that my name on my birth certificate was fuckface.

    my point? being good in school doesnt mean you are smart.

    Leave a comment:


  • greatheight
    replied
    Originally posted by ouchboy View Post
    According to Homeopathy, wouldn't that be the cure for pregnancy? Just sayin...

    Leave a comment:


  • ouchboy
    replied

    Leave a comment:


  • wetware
    replied
    Originally posted by radshop View Post
    I still think you are missing the point - except W. Rabbit who actually made a legitimate attempt. Consider this. My first exposure to homeopathy was about 10 years ago - I met a guy who has a Masters in Biochem from Stanford, had worked as biochemist in industry for over 10 years and left to become a naturopathic/homeopathic doctor and went back to school for 3 years getting certified and licensed in California to practice. He recommended homeopathy to me and claimed that it really works based on his (at that time) over 5 years of clinical practice. He had reams of evidence to back up his claim.
    Well, I did my own research and found that there are indeed other bright, educated people who believe in homeopathy and who are convinced that water has a special memory property under certain conditions. I'm not convinced by their arguments, but I think the level of argumentation on this thread is mostly an amateur circle-jerk.
    When you claim to know something is false, and are confronted with your own lack of evidence for that claim, your have no standing to cry "argument from ignorance." Back up your claim.
    Those bright educated people you mentioned who 'believe' in homeopathy have something in common. They're selling people water. In order for you to believe them, then you must do one of two things: either disregard much of what the human race knows about physics and chemistry or be a complete and total fucktard who has far more money than sense.

    I started to write a response which contained logic and references. Then I realized it was a waste of my time, since you obviously didn't understand what an argument from ignorance fallacy is.

    By the way. Your friend? The one with the biochemistry degree? He's a con man. A shill. Must be nice to lack the ethics needed to not sell people bottles full of tap water and promise them it will cure their woes.

    Oh... once again though. Hush.

    Leave a comment:


  • goodlun
    replied
    Originally posted by radshop View Post
    I still think you are missing the point - except W. Rabbit who actually made a legitimate attempt. Consider this. My first exposure to homeopathy was about 10 years ago - I met a guy who has a Masters in Biochem from Stanford, had worked as biochemist in industry for over 10 years and left to become a naturopathic/homeopathic doctor and went back to school for 3 years getting certified and licensed in California to practice. He recommended homeopathy to me and claimed that it really works based on his (at that time) over 5 years of clinical practice. He had reams of ehttp://www.bullshido.net/forums/newreply.php?do=newreply&p=2475051vidence to back up his claim.
    Well, I did my own research and found that there are indeed other bright, educated people who believe in homeopathy and who are convinced that water has a special memory property under certain conditions. I'm not convinced by their arguments, but I think the level of argumentation on this thread is mostly an amateur circle-jerk.
    When you claim to know something is false, and are confronted with your own lack of evidence for that claim, your have no standing to cry "argument from ignorance." Back up your claim.
    "Appeal to authority" much? When exactly did he get liscnesed again? Cause you didn't need one(actually you still don't) in the state of CA to practice homopathy. I do believe CA didn't even start offering any sort of licensing until 2003.

    Leave a comment:


  • SifuJason
    replied
    Originally posted by radshop View Post
    I still think you are missing the point - except W. Rabbit who actually made a legitimate attempt. Consider this. My first exposure to homeopathy was about 10 years ago - I met a guy who has a Masters in Biochem from Stanford, had worked as biochemist in industry for over 10 years and left to become a naturopathic/homeopathic doctor and went back to school for 3 years getting certified and licensed in California to practice. He recommended homeopathy to me and claimed that it really works based on his (at that time) over 5 years of clinical practice. He had reams of evidence to back up his claim.
    Well, I did my own research and found that there are indeed other bright, educated people who believe in homeopathy and who are convinced that water has a special memory property under certain conditions. I'm not convinced by their arguments, but I think the level of argumentation on this thread is mostly an amateur circle-jerk.
    When you claim to know something is false, and are confronted with your own lack of evidence for that claim, your have no standing to cry "argument from ignorance." Back up your claim.
    1) If he got a masters in biochem, that means he couldn't make it as a PhD. Masters in most sciences (not engineering) are a sign of that, unless they did it as a stepping stone to a PhD.

    2) There is no sound clinical evidence that homeopathy works. Not a single good clinical trial I have ever come across. It's also fairly easy to do, since you can placebo blind homeopathy, unlike things like acupuncture, which is a problem with research in that field. Thus, until someone provides evidence of efficacy, we can assume its crap. We don't assume somethings until otherwise. In good science, one always assumes the null hypothesis (ie there is no difference, it doesn't work, etc) until proven reasonably otherwise.

    Leave a comment:

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