PDA

View Full Version : Help With Planning One Year Sabbatical



ML
8/26/2010 5:16am,
Hello there! I'm planning to take one year off work in the next one or two years to train.

I've had <10 lessons in karate, <10 lessons in BJJ, <10 lessons in aikido and <5 lessons in judo.

I'd like to spend the year on Judo and/or BJJ. Since I'm essentially a beginner in both, would it be more efficient for me to focus the entire year on just one of them?

Having read the "Jitsu In Edinburgh, Opinions? (http://www.bullshido.net/forums/showthread.php?t=87907)" thread, Edinburgh looks like a pretty tempting location, but I'm still looking for places that does intensive training.

Thanks for taking your time to read this!

BaronVonDingDong
8/26/2010 6:38am,
Where are you located? Would it be feasible to spend a year in Brazil?

ML
8/26/2010 8:05am,
Brazil is a possible option, since I "do not require visa to go to Brazil for tourism (up to 90 days stay)". Any recommendations?

Edinburgh is tempting to me because I have friends there, and should anything go pear-shaped (touch wood!) I can count on them to come to my rescue. What's the healthcare for tourists like in Brazil?

BaronVonDingDong
8/26/2010 8:53am,
I can't answer any specific questions, having never been to Brazil, but there are other members here who've gone with the specific aim of training. Hopefully they'll notice this thread and chime in - otherwise, perhaps you could start a new thread "Advice on training in Brazil". The benefits are, of course, returning to the source, although, again, you'll have to ask those that have been whether it's ultimately worth it.

With that said, you can find exceptional bjj schools in any major city. I've just moved to NYC, where Renzo Gracie, Vitor Shoalin, Alliance BJJ, and Marcelo Garcia are all a 15 minute walk from where I work.

CrackFox
8/26/2010 12:06pm,
Edinburgh is a really nice place to live, and you can get some top notch BJJ and Judo training there, but if I were going to take a year off and do martial arts, and there was going to be travelling involved, I'd probably go with BJJ in Brazil or Muay Thai in Thailand.

Of course, I suppose it depends on how much goofing off you plan on doing. I would do a lot.

ML
8/27/2010 3:40am,
A year off work is enough goofing off for me. :)

I am concerned about accidents and stuff, if I could find a partner I'd be a lot more comfortable with going to Brazil or Thailand. :(

ChenPengFi
8/27/2010 4:15am,
Seriously? What you have amounts to maybe a couple of months training.
While pretty much everyone here would love a year long training sabbatical, i'll go on a limb and say it might be a waste of time without a foundation.
While obviously you will learn faster when that is all you have to do, the learning curve in anything steepens a bit after the beginner stage.
You will learn more in the same amount of time as an intermediate student as opposed to being a beginner.
My suggestion is to train as hard as you can and still have a job through the beginner stages and then if you are sure this is what you want, go do the training sabbatical.
You will have better established goals and a better foundation to build upon.
After all, newbs can only handle so much training...

ML
8/27/2010 5:11am,
My suggestion is to train as hard as you can and still have a job through the beginner stages and then if you are sure this is what you want, go do the training sabbatical.The long and short is that I can either quit my job to train, or take a one-year sabbatical to train.

ChenPengFi
8/27/2010 5:19am,
You can't train and work, or take the sabbatical later?
That seems an unlikely dilemma.
Additionally, if you can only train for a year how much do you really anticipate learning?
MAs are a long and arduous journey, a year will likely not get you far even in the best of circumstances.

ML
8/27/2010 7:54am,
You can't train and work, or take the sabbatical later?
That seems an unlikely dilemma.I'm outstationed most of the time, and I travel between outstations fairly frequently. I am taking the sabbatical later - in one or two year's time, as stated in the first sentence of the first post.


Additionally, if you can only train for a year how much do you really anticipate learning?
MAs are a long and arduous journey, a year will likely not get you far even in the best of circumstances.Being on the journey is more important to me than how far this one year journey will take me. Who knows, maybe this one year will inspire me to quit my job. Or maybe I'll decide that martial arts isn't for me and just go back to the grind.

ChenPengFi
8/27/2010 3:17pm,
in one or two year's time, as stated in the first sentence of the first post.
Sorry, i meant take the sabbatical after some more foundational training.
Sounds like a difficult work situation?

ML
8/28/2010 12:49am,
Sounds like a difficult work situation?It's a good but demanding job. Good enough to make me so comfortable that I almost nearly don't mind what I might be missing out on.