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MorningLemon
7/22/2010 3:24am,
Alright here it is:

My coach is heading to Thailand to train early August and has asked me to teach the kids Bjj class, I said of course. It'll be a good experience.


He has given me a basic syllabus with what he would like me to teach, and I've taught the teens class before and have given help during the adult classes but have never worked with the kids.

Any pointers, suggestions or help?

Dargentus
7/22/2010 6:09am,
Be patient.

Establish your authority without being an ass.

Be patient.

Be consistent; Inconsistancy is really bad when you're dealing with kids

Be patient.

Make it fun.

Be patient.

Enjoy yourself, and share your own enthusiasm for your art.

Be patient.

MorningLemon
7/22/2010 7:18am,
Be patient.

Establish your authority without being an ass.

Be patient.

Be consistent; Inconsistancy is really bad when you're dealing with kids

Be patient.

Make it fun.

Be patient.

Enjoy yourself, and share your own enthusiasm for your art.

Be patient.


Ok so what you're saying is "Lay the smack down and assert authority before they trample you"

am I getting this?

Soldiermedic
7/22/2010 9:33am,
Be structured and firm, but dont get bent out of shape when they all are too giggly to pay attention.

Kintanon
7/22/2010 9:54am,
Have you WATCHED the kids classes to see how your instructor runs them and what kind of discipline is used to keep the kids on task, etc...?
Your life will be 10x easier if you know how your instructor runs the class and can pattern your classes the same way. Watch and possibly video tape a few of the kids classes so you can get a good feel for how things are done and it will save you a lot of trouble.

Omega Supreme
7/22/2010 11:57am,
I always tell my instructors to have fun with it and don't expect the same results you would with adults. Be happy with the small things. Hell I teach 3 year olds; I'm happy if they know where to line up (Then again sometimes the adults have a hard time with that.)

omoplatypus
7/22/2010 12:32pm,
most of my classes were kids under the age of 13. patience patience patience, that's how you get to carnagie hall.

you can also ask to be the assistant instructor for a couple of classes before you take over.

the most fun game that anybody ever played at my old judo club was "tackle the big kid". the biggest little ************ in the room gets a head start while 3 little judo bochers try to tackle him rugby style and keep him on the mats. if he made it off the mats in under 30 seconds his attackers had to do pushups, otherwise he was pushing.

keep conditioning exercises fun. be patient. make games. oh, and talk to the parents on the way out the door.

Meex
7/22/2010 1:59pm,
A lot of good advice here ^^^

Realize that their attention span is about as long as this sentence,
and be okay with that.

Learn to laugh with them at the funny things that will happen,
while maintaining basic discipline and control over instruction.

Never get (visibly) angry at a child/student. If the problem is
safety related, take the time to explain proper technique to all.

And, as has been said. . .patience, patience, patience.

Good luck!
`~/

MorningLemon
7/23/2010 2:45am,
Thanks for all the help guys. I think I may have a sit in at a class and take some notes, the class is quite small so it shouldn't be too bad.

ritegrapple
7/24/2010 1:33pm,
Sensei John Kreese was a good role model for teaching teenagers. Do that.

maofas
7/26/2010 8:14am,
I thought I didn't have anything to add beyond what was said, but last Weds' kiddie class reminded me: expect, not just the unexpected, but **** that makes no goddamn sense at all!

We were doing super-basic parry/counter drills. Not 10 seconds after we start a kid runs up to me with his mouth all bloody and goes, "MY TOOTH GOT KNOCKED OUT".

Well, it turned out that statement wasn't entirely accurate, as 3 other kids rat him out. The kid punched HIMSELF in the face. I asked him why he did it, and he goes, "I wanted to see what it was like!"

Sigh!!!!

Omega Supreme
7/26/2010 12:03pm,
I thought I didn't have anything to add beyond what was said, but last Weds' kiddie class reminded me: expect, not just the unexpected, but **** that makes no goddamn sense at all!

We were doing super-basic parry/counter drills. Not 10 seconds after we start a kid runs up to me with his mouth all bloody and goes, "MY TOOTH GOT KNOCKED OUT".

Well, it turned out that statement wasn't entirely accurate, as 3 other kids rat him out. The kid punched HIMSELF in the face. I asked him why he did it, and he goes, "I wanted to see what it was like!"

Sigh!!!!

Oh yeah, been there.

Snake Plissken
7/26/2010 12:38pm,
adding to this:

make sure, at least for that week, the parents don't just "drop off the kids and leave and will come back when class is done and pick them up because you know we gotta get to the bank and the store and get a few things....."

Even after two years of teaching the kids class, there was this one week where the head instructor was going to be gone and one little 4 yr. old girl girl was crying herself silly because the head instructor wasn't there and she was afraid. She got used to his being there and just flat out didn't want to participate.

Luckily, her mother wasn't one of the parents who would leave, so I went out to the parking lot and brought her in. Her sister stayed in class but the 4 yr. old just didn't want to, despite her mother's prodding.

So, some kids are good with change and some kids aren't. Make sure the head instructor informs all the parents and announces it to the kids so they are prepared before hand. Make yourself available to the parents before hand, if they don't already know you from seeing you around the classes and ask that, at least for the first class or two, that they hang around in case their kids aren't as comfortable with you being their sole instructor.

and have fun.