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Mr. Machette
7/14/2010 5:20pm,
Hey guys,

So after about two months of getting back into the swing of things with regular light cardio, dumb bells, and calithenics, I decided to step it up and start doing a little running.

Been keeping it small. Walk for a hundred yards, run for a hundred yards, walk for a hundred yards, run for a hundred yards ect...

The only problem is that this is seriously killing me! Not just the exhaustion, that's ok. But my legs, core, back, shoulders everything! It's all brutally sore and knotted for days after a small run.

It's even cutting into my other routines. I can't do as much of the calisthenics or barbells because I'm still recovering from the run, and other types of cardio are completely out of the question because my legs are shot to hell for about 72 hours at least.

So my question is;

Is this normal? Should I just continue until my body adjusts and I can get back to my normal rate with the other exercises? Or should I scrap the running altogether, and come back to it later when I'm in better shape?

Any thoughts, suggestions?

Aodhan
7/14/2010 5:55pm,
Hey guys,

So after about two months of getting back into the swing of things with regular light cardio, dumb bells, and calithenics, I decided to step it up and start doing a little running.

Been keeping it small. Walk for a hundred yards, run for a hundred yards, walk for a hundred yards, run for a hundred yards ect...

The only problem is that this is seriously killing me! Not just the exhaustion, that's ok. But my legs, core, back, shoulders everything! It's all brutally sore and knotted for days after a small run.

It's even cutting into my other routines. I can't do as much of the calisthenics or barbells because I'm still recovering from the run, and other types of cardio are completely out of the question because my legs are shot to hell for about 72 hours at least.

So my question is;

Is this normal? Should I just continue until my body adjusts and I can get back to my normal rate with the other exercises? Or should I scrap the running altogether, and come back to it later when I'm in better shape?

Any thoughts, suggestions?

1. How far are you going?
2. How often are you running?
3. How old are your shoes?
4. What kind of shoes do you have?
5. What else do you do on days you run?

You shouldn't be knotted up all over. There is no reason that running should knot up your shoulders, or really even your core/back (Although you will have some residual soreness just because its a new activity). What kind of running are you doing, light jog or all out sprints? And you can't come back to it "in better shape", the only way to get better at running, is....running.

Something is not right, or you're not telling us everything.

John

Mr. Machette
7/14/2010 6:44pm,
1. How far are you going?
2. How often are you running?
3. How old are your shoes?
4. What kind of shoes do you have?
5. What else do you do on days you run?

You shouldn't be knotted up all over. There is no reason that running should knot up your shoulders, or really even your core/back (Although you will have some residual soreness just because its a new activity). What kind of running are you doing, light jog or all out sprints? And you can't come back to it "in better shape", the only way to get better at running, is....running.

Something is not right, or you're not telling us everything.

John
1. As far as I can stand. Last time was about 3/4 mile, with about 200 yards worth of sprinting, and 100yards worth of jogging. The rest was just walking. (inbetween 100yard running intervals.)

2. About once every four days. That's how long it's taking for my legs to recover enough to try again.

3. Brand new.

4. Nike cross trainers. (It's the best I have right now.)

5. Just work before the run. If it overlaps with a barbells day, I do them after the run when I've rested enough to get my wind back.

I may have missphrased. I'm not knotted ALL over.

The "abductor magnus" in my groin knotted up but good after my last run. The rest of me is just the regular old DOMS kind of stuff. It usually shows up when I try a new exercise, and goes away after about the fourth session.

Another thing is that I've only just started doing the running thing after years of not running. Like at all. Zilch. Nada. So I expected things to be tough, but I just want to make sure I'm not on the path to injury. I don't like setbacks at all.

Vorpal
7/14/2010 6:48pm,
Are you running or jogging? When I was a kid we ran all day (before video games) nobody ever got shinsplints. When I first started running for fitness I got them all the time. Usually when we run we will pick some time, distance or combination thereof as a goal. Your body will then unconsciously try to accomplish that goal by using the least amount of effort, this alters your natural gait and leads to problems. Think about it, if I snatched your wallet and was running down the street you wouldn't jog after me, you would run in a fast, loose, natural gait. You need to run that way. Take time and distance off the table. Go out, warm up and take off. Run fast until you can't run anymore. Walk a little, run some more. Go home. Once a month or so you can go to the track to check your time. I ran that way for years and years without ever getting shinsplints (or virtually any other running injury) again.

Mr. Machette
7/14/2010 6:56pm,
Go out, warm up and take off. Run fast until you can't run anymore. Walk a little, run some more.
That's pretty much what I'm doing.

I've been doing stretches for the front of the calves, and that has kept the shin splints away. (I can get them and compression injuries in my ankles some thing awful if I'm not careful)

Bu yeah, I just sprint at the pace I can, jog at the pace I can, and walk around when I can't do either anymore.

I'm just doing this to get trim, not to break any records. So as long as I can keep exercising, I'm happy.

DKJr
7/14/2010 6:58pm,
Start doing squats and deadlift. Ever since I've been doing stronglifts 5x5 I swear I can run longer and 10x faster without my legs getting sore.

HFox
7/14/2010 7:01pm,
You are giving your body adequate time to warm up before going full out aren't you? Whenever I'm doing any sort of sprints I always warm up with at least 5 minutes of light jogging with short (5-10 second sprints) once a minute or so to get my body ready for the more difficult interval sprinting ahead.

I know some people don't stretch but I also always try to warm up for a few minutes then do light stretching before sprints, especially my quads, hams and calves.

What kind of surface are you running on? When you run are you tensing your upper body or shrugging your shoulders? I can't see that as the issue you are having but I catch myself doing it fairly frequently and have to make sure to keep it relaxed, especially my shoulders.

Mr. Machette
7/14/2010 7:27pm,
Start doing squats and deadlift. Ever since I've been doing stronglifts 5x5 I swear I can run longer and 10x faster without my legs getting sore.
Got it!

I'm on the lookout for a bar and weights as we speak for just that purpose. (I heard both those exercises are massively beneficial all over.)

Mr. Machette
7/14/2010 7:33pm,
You are giving your body adequate time to warm up before going full out aren't you? Whenever I'm doing any sort of sprints I always warm up with at least 5 minutes of light jogging with short (5-10 second sprints) once a minute or so to get my body ready for the more difficult interval sprinting ahead.
Cool, I'll try this next time.


I know some people don't stretch but I also always try to warm up for a few minutes then do light stretching before sprints, especially my quads, hams and calves.
I have to stretch first or I'm basically out of the game for at least a week. That's how bad it will tear me up if I don't do the proper warm ups.



What kind of surface are you running on? When you run are you tensing your upper body or shrugging your shoulders? I can't see that as the issue you are having but I catch myself doing it fairly frequently and have to make sure to keep it relaxed, especially my shoulders.
Asphalt, unfortunately.

There is a 200 yard driveway leading up to the property I live on. Directly in the middle are trees on either side of the road. I use those landmarks to keep track of my distance. The driveway also dips at those trees so I get a mild downhill and uphill with each lap.

I think I am tensing my shoulders. I'll have to pay batter attention to that, and try to stay loose.

Aodhan
7/14/2010 8:21pm,
1. As far as I can stand. Last time was about 3/4 mile, with about 200 yards worth of sprinting, and 100yards worth of jogging. The rest was just walking. (inbetween 100yard running intervals.)

2. About once every four days. That's how long it's taking for my legs to recover enough to try again.

3. Brand new.

4. Nike cross trainers. (It's the best I have right now.)

5. Just work before the run. If it overlaps with a barbells day, I do them after the run when I've rested enough to get my wind back.

I may have missphrased. I'm not knotted ALL over.

The "abductor magnus" in my groin knotted up but good after my last run. The rest of me is just the regular old DOMS kind of stuff. It usually shows up when I try a new exercise, and goes away after about the fourth session.

Another thing is that I've only just started doing the running thing after years of not running. Like at all. Zilch. Nada. So I expected things to be tough, but I just want to make sure I'm not on the path to injury. I don't like setbacks at all.

Ok. Lets address these points.

1. Stop it. Sprinting/speed work like that of any kind will destroy you. If you can't run at a reasonable pace (say 10:00/mile), then jog 100-200 yards, walk 100. Don't sprint/run hard. Guaranteed way to tear yourself up.

2. You should be able to run almost every day if done properly. See #1. Start out with 3-6 miles per week, and increase 5-10% when that becomes easy/comfortable to do.

3. shoes need a break in time.

4. Get running shoes. I'm serious. Cross trainers are ok, but you want shoes specifically for running. Also, if you are using the cross trainers for everything, then they are breaking down faster than running alone will do.Shoes are good for 2-400 miles on average.

5. Ok. Do a mild warmup (skipping, active stride kind of stuff) and then run. See #1.

Was it the inside or outside of the leg? I would bet it's the inside, which would be your adductor. (I always remember ADDuctors ADD things to the body, i.e. bring them back to center). And yeah, if you are sprinting on bad shoes and poor run fitness, that will cramp up. I had that happen after a long run and I about cried like a baby. that muscle cramp is seriously no joke.

Take it slow, take it easy and work your way into it. If all you can do is jog 1/2 mile, then jog 1/2 mile. Ramping up mileage and speed too fast is a 100% sure way to hurt yourself.

John

honesty
7/15/2010 2:13am,
I'm 100kg, and have/had fallen arches. I was advised by a very knowledgeable man to stop running completely. I now row. Running is fine, but for me it was tearing up my calves because of these issues. Doing another form of cardio had less impact on me and allowed me to go longer when doing it. You don't need to run, cycling or rowing is better in my opinion.

Eddie Hardon
7/15/2010 7:04am,
That's pretty much what I'm doing.

I've been doing stretches for the front of the calves, and that has kept the shin splints away. (I can get them and compression injuries in my ankles some thing awful if I'm not careful)

Bu yeah, I just sprint at the pace I can, jog at the pace I can, and walk around when I can't do either anymore.

I'm just doing this to get trim, not to break any records. So as long as I can keep exercising, I'm happy.

having got back into it after a period (I'm running 3 miles 2/3 times a week) you need to Warm Down to help clear the Lactic Acid and then Stretch more than you are. All Body but with an emphasis on Leg Stretches - the Calves etc is woefully inadequate. Part of you soreness is owing to your failure to clear the Lactic Acid AND your muscles are shortening after exercise hence your need to do additional Leg and Groin Stretches.

Your problems should then disappear.

Keep it up and Good Luck.

unclejustin
7/15/2010 8:55am,
Agreed with the stop sprinting statement earlier. You need to ease into it. The first time I started running "seriously" I gave myself shin splints and got all knotted up just like you are. It was from pushing too hard too soon. Jog lightly at a nice steady pace and work yourself up. You should be able to run everyday with no problems, our species has been doing it for thousands of years. Just take your time and stick with it. Also have you tried skipping rope? It's great for cardio, and I found it easier on my legs than running. It helped me out a ton to get back into shape and run easier.

Craig Jenkins
7/15/2010 9:10am,
Tensing your shoulders - yes I did this for a long time - even used to get headaches from running with my shoulders 'up'. Try to concentrate on dropping your shoulders, and dno't worry about being fast. Run embarassingly slow if you need to, but get out and build your base before you start doing sprints or hills or anything like that. Too easy to get hurt and screw everything else you're trying to do.

I've been trying to run 3-4 days a week too - just 5k on a normal day and 10 on a long day. But's it's taken me 3 months to get there. Slow and steady. Just the last few weeks started on hills.

You might consider this
Amazon.com: Running Start to Finish (9781551050966): John Stanton:… (http://www.amazon.com/Running-Start-Finish-John-Stanton/dp/155105096X)
I'm sure there are a lot of good books out there, but this one stresses time in for beginners - run/walk program to build up a base before getting funky.

Prince Vlad
7/15/2010 9:20am,
My ostepath recommended me to do a combination of very slow squats on balance pads and one legged squats on a raised bench to build up the support structure around my knees (perfect form is extremely important). I had similar problems as yourself when I got back into running which were compounded by running on concrete. If you're starting back you should try running on grass or sand - anything to help reduce the impact.
Proper running shoes are also a must. Some stores will have a machine that will record the pressure left by your feet at different parts of your stride. Based on the result you can find out which type of shoe suits you best. If you have feet that naturally point outwards you may need orthotic insert into your shoes (these are expensive) to take the pressure off a certain point on your knee, sacrum or hip. If proper running shoes and taking things a little easier don't help maybe you should talk to a physiotherapist or osteopath etc - you don't want to cause permanent damage to your joints.

Aodhan
7/15/2010 10:23am,
I'm 100kg, and have/had fallen arches. I was advised by a very knowledgeable man to stop running completely. I now row. Running is fine, but for me it was tearing up my calves because of these issues. Doing another form of cardio had less impact on me and allowed me to go longer when doing it. You don't need to run, cycling or rowing is better in my opinion.

Cycling, rowing and swimming are all GREAT cardio, and very low impact.

But, if someone told you to stop running because of fallen arches, he wasn't that knowledgeable. There are thousands of people that run perfectly normally with fallen arches, and the correct inserts/shoes for their strike pattern.

John