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snowman
4/22/2010 4:46am,
Getting the obligatory suck it up ***** out of the way.

Life has been getting in the way as of late, I used to always find time regardless of how busy I was to get to training, but the last couple of months being busy at work, injuries, and looking for and buying a place has just seems to have sapped me of any motivation to the point where I'd rather go home and watch Deadwood than drive to training.

I'm down to 1 or 2 days of BJJ and a couple days of lifting, going from 3-4 days BJJ 1 day judo / 3 days lifting.

Injuries have pretty much come good, but the brain just isn't into it at the moment, not sure why, just seem to have lost that desire.

The motivation drop has come at a pretty lousy time as a few of us from the gym are heading over to Brazil to train for a few weeks in November.

I know everyone goes through this, and it isn't my livelihood, it is just a hobby, but eh, no goals, no fun, no training?

So long story short, advice to get over training slump.

tnx

Prince Vlad
4/22/2010 6:04am,
I'm just coming out of a training slump, it was real hard because of some nasty injuries followed by going back on the sauce for a couple of weeks. There is a really excellent strength coach/personal trainer/nutritionist at the gym I train at so I went to him to get me back on track. It's only been about two week and my energy levels and motivation are back on track. I never did personal training before as I assumed it was a load of bollocks but the guy I use is really good. He measured everything at the start including body fat, blood pressure, max reps and VO2 max (to be rechecked every 4 weeks moving forward) - then got me started on what can only be described as the most vomit inducing work outs I've ever done (rehab exercises included for the injuries). There is no way I could work out like that without having someone looking at the clock, correct my form, spotting the heavy lifts and shouting in my ear. The end result is my KM training is back on course. At my KM school we do a lot of grappling, sparring and forced anaerobic drills - I had started dreading training because my cardio, strength and conditioning were shot which which had started to erode my motivation.
All good now though and my energy levels seem better already. Worth checking out if the facility is available at your gym. For me keeping on top of general fitness and conditioning is what keeps me on track with everything else. Obviously it depends entirely on the PT you use though (plus you being able to push through the pain barrier). Good luck with it, hope you get back on course.

ADM
4/22/2010 6:52am,
My first art was kickboxing, did it for a year, then stopped (lets say the place went in a direction that I felt wasn't aimed at fighting anymore).

I then stopped all training ... for 2 years.

Since coming back I've been going about 7-8 years now without a break.

Suck it up buddy, make time, time won't make you.

pauli
4/22/2010 6:55am,
sometimes you really do need to just take a break. spend some time away from the mats, and you'll either get the bug back, or realize that you need something different.

Sang
4/22/2010 7:20am,
That's what i hated most about fight training, you can't afford to go through a slump in motivation if you have a fight booked every month.

What works for me is to change the focus of my training, if Muay Thai in particular is bumming me out I'll spend 3 months working mainly on improving one aspect of it such as the clinch or I'll reduce the number of sessions and focus on weights/sprint training.

Another good method is to start writing a training log, getting your thoughts down on paper is a great way to figure out where you want to be heading with your training.

tao.jonez
4/22/2010 9:03am,
Set a specific goal and a specific time frame to reach it.

So instead of "lose some weight" try "lose 10 lbs of fat by June 15".

Instead of "get better at BJJ" you could "pull off one armbar every class". And really study/work armbars for a couple months.

Shave 3 minutes off your 3 mile run time by May 30th.

A specific, attainable, and measurable goal can really help put you on track.

Kintanon
4/22/2010 9:09am,
I second the training log idea, also start reading other peoples training logs. I have one at kintanon.blogspot.com, slideyfoot has one at www.slideyfoot.com there are a few others around. Building connections with other peoples experiences will help you get through slumps, plus we all have slumps and those of us with blogs talk about them and how we get through them.
One thing is to not worry too much about it. Take a couple of weeks completely off from training. Watch some bjj videos and some mma fights, but don't train at all. I know by the end of 2 weeks without training I'm burning to get back on the mats no matter how much of a "**** this ****..." slump I was in at the beginning.

jnp
4/22/2010 9:12am,
sometimes you really do need to just take a break. spend some time away from the mats, and you'll either get the bug back, or realize that you need something different.
This. Absence makes the heart grow fonder. Whenever I have a motivational slump I take a week or two off. Seems to work wonders. I start missing it and I can't wait to get back.

Monkfg
4/22/2010 9:57am,
You can get addicted to everything you like. How much do you like training?

Eddie Hardon
4/22/2010 10:26am,
Getting the obligatory suck it up ***** out of the way.

Life has been getting in the way as of late, I used to always find time regardless of how busy I was to get to training, but the last couple of months being busy at work, injuries, and looking for and buying a place has just seems to have sapped me of any motivation to the point where I'd rather go home and watch Deadwood than drive to training.

I'm down to 1 or 2 days of BJJ and a couple days of lifting, going from 3-4 days BJJ 1 day judo / 3 days lifting.

Injuries have pretty much come good, but the brain just isn't into it at the moment, not sure why, just seem to have lost that desire.

The motivation drop has come at a pretty lousy time as a few of us from the gym are heading over to Brazil to train for a few weeks in November.

I know everyone goes through this, and it isn't my livelihood, it is just a hobby, but eh, no goals, no fun, no training?

So long story short, advice to get over training slump.

tnx

'Cos when your Over-train, you get Stale.

So, you're probably overdoing it, so cut back (something) and give yourself some proper Recovery Time.

At a past Q&A session with The Great Royce, his reply to training everyday was you'd get Burn-Out.

Cut back on the weights and do something else that also interests you, without being too demanding. That should allow your Spirit to improve and re-activate your hunger to advance.

Cheers

maofas
4/22/2010 10:57am,
Personally, I've found vacations to be detrimental. Often a person just plans on a short break, but it turns into a much longer break. You know how the longer you stay out of touch with a friend the harder it is to call them? Same principal IMO.

Any day I don't have to practice I feel full of energy/jumpy and wish fervently I had someone to do a little rolling/pads with. Any day I DO have to practice I feel tired and unmotivated and don't want to go.

In 18 years so far of practicing MA I've never once felt, "Omg I can't wait to get to class tonight!" However, I've also never once failed to be 100% into it once I actually arrive and get started. Inertia is the real killer.

The key is to push through that feeling and go anyways, because it's important to set a precedence for yourself of being the type of person who never misses practice. Once you establish a trend, good or bad, it becomes taboo to deviate from it which helps balance out the inertia trying to keep you in your computer chair.

Tom .C
4/22/2010 11:22am,
Sometimes a slump requires a change of focus. It was already mentioned that picking some aspect of your game that needs improvement and working on that will often get you back into the game. Setting small goals and noting their accomplishment will help you remember that your practice is not wasted time. I've worked through a lot of slumps and unless it is pressure from unrelated issues, working on the smaller things really helps to improve your perspective.

Kintanon
4/22/2010 11:46am,
Personally, I've found vacations to be detrimental. Often a person just plans on a short break, but it turns into a much longer break. You know how the longer you stay out of touch with a friend the harder it is to call them? Same principal IMO.

Any day I don't have to practice I feel full of energy/jumpy and wish fervently I had someone to do a little rolling/pads with. Any day I DO have to practice I feel tired and unmotivated and don't want to go.

In 18 years so far of practicing MA I've never once felt, "Omg I can't wait to get to class tonight!" However, I've also never once failed to be 100% into it once I actually arrive and get started. Inertia is the real killer.

The key is to push through that feeling and go anyways, because it's important to set a precedence for yourself of being the type of person who never misses practice. Once you establish a trend, good or bad, it becomes taboo to deviate from it which helps balance out the inertia trying to keep you in your computer chair.

Wow, that's crazy. I count down the minutes until I get to go to class. Whenever I'm not doin jits I wish I were. Whenever I have to miss a few classes for work I get agitated and hyped up and wired. On the days when I have class I look forward to it all day.

slideyfoot
4/22/2010 1:37pm,
I know everyone goes through this, and it isn't my livelihood, it is just a hobby, but eh, no goals, no fun, no training? [...]

So long story short, advice to get over training slump.

The bit on my FAQ (http://www.slideyfoot.com/2006/10/bjj-beginner-faq.html#frustration) is about frustration, but it seems related to the kind of thing you're talking about:

Focus on a small number of techniques and concentrate on just working those in sparring. It may even just be that you steadily work one tiny part of a particular technique - perhaps where you want your hands to be at a certain point - but that all contributes to eventually getting the technique right, and in turn means you're being constructive and have a clear goal to work towards.

I also find a technique-focused method of training helps with motivation, as it's a useful way of ignoring ego: you're not thinking about 'winning' or 'losing', just making technical improvements. It doesn't matter if you get tapped along the way.

Following on from that, I'd strongly recommend keeping a training log, like others have already. Personally, I've found doing so has been of massive benefit to my training: to copy what I wrote somewhere else, for a start it makes it easier to remember technique. The process of putting what you've just learned into words means you have to carefully think about exactly what you did in class. Even if your memory of it isn't that great, that will still mean you know specifically which parts you're unsure about, so can then ask your instructor next time you train.

That also helps with recollecting terminology, which I find can be a big problem in BJJ. Of course, that normally means you only learn the terminology used in your particular school, but still of benefit. Ideally, I'd like to be able to learn the most common terms used globally, as well as just in my school: it then becomes easier to search places like the net for hints and tips on specific techniques.

In addition to remembering technique, writing notes also means you can track your own progress, and identify what you feel you need to work on. As with writing up techniques, that then means you can concentrate on what went 'wrong', for want of a better word, asking your instructor and training partners how you could improve. So in effect, your notes become an action plan for the next sparring session.

Also, read this fantastic thread (http://www.bullshido.net/forums/showthread.php?p=974042), if you haven't already. This (http://www.bullshido.net/forums/showthread.php?p=2251605) is also well worth a look, as is this (http://www.jopreacher.com/2009/03/leaving-ego-at-door.html) blog post.

shelbydeth
4/22/2010 2:09pm,
Any day I don't have to practice I feel full of energy/jumpy and wish fervently I had someone to do a little rolling/pads with. Any day I DO have to practice I feel tired and unmotivated and don't want to go.

In 18 years so far of practicing MA I've never once felt, "Omg I can't wait to get to class tonight!" However, I've also never once failed to be 100% into it once I actually arrive and get started. Inertia is the real killer.

It's like you're in my brain man.

maofas
4/22/2010 4:42pm,
^
That's why I said it's important to establish a rhythm of not missing class ever. You feel inertia much less if it's extremely habitual to go to class no matter what. Every time you skip it's that much easier to skip. I've seen so many people come and go and come back and quit again over the years already and I'm not old yet; I think if they understood all this they'd be able to become more consistent.


Wow, that's crazy.

It is, but the important thing is to understand your own craziness so you know when to not listen to your feelings and just do what you're supposed to do/what you really want to do.