PDA

View Full Version : Help! I'm a fat sack of crap!



Pages : [1] 2

Arkansan
10/28/2009 7:05pm,
Okay, so I think the thread title should be a good indication of my problem. I'm twenty a little over six foot and about 235. I am looking to get down to a solid 200, get a bit stronger, and get in good overall shape. My biggest issue is that I have no experience in working out and I am piss freaking poor at the moment. I purchased a weight bench and about 100lbs of weights a year or so ago, and have a track less than 3 miles from my house. Would someone be kind enough to help me set up a work out program using what little I have at my disposal. My main goal is weight loss and cardio fitness, but I wouldn't mind getting stronger at the same time. I am a complete noob at this sort of thing so any help would be greatly appreciated.

AlphaFoxtrot51
10/28/2009 7:15pm,
Okay, so I think the thread title should be a good indication of my problem. I'm twenty a little over six foot and about 235. I am looking to get down to a solid 200, get a bit stronger, and get in good overall shape. My biggest issue is that I have no experience in working out and I am piss freaking poor at the moment. I purchased a weight bench and about 100lbs of weights a year or so ago, and have a track less than 3 miles from my house. Would someone be kind enough to help me set up a work out program using what little I have at my disposal. My main goal is weight loss and cardio fitness, but I wouldn't mind getting stronger at the same time. I am a complete noob at this sort of thing so any help would be greatly appreciated.

The best advice I can offer, besides doing cardio, is to find a diet plan that works for you and stick to it. Any diet that tells you not to include a food group is full of crap (IMO), so come up with something that is healthy and balanced.

I'd recommend spending a week, writing down everything you eat and when. Record the information about each food (if available). Put that list up here and move on from there.

elipson
10/28/2009 7:22pm,
Run to that track, and then run home.

Seriously though, if you want to start running (and it may not be everyones cup of tea) there is a great thread on here on the proper way to slowly get yourself into running shape.

Cardio is going to be your best friend if you are looking to lose weight (in addition to a proper diet like alphafoxtrot mentioned). Running may not be the best cardio for you, but there is also cycling, swimming, and/or different martial arts programs. As much as I dislike cardio kickboxing for any kind of self-defense purpose, I think it's a good way to get people interested in a cardio program when normally they wouldn't bother.

AlphaFoxtrot51
10/28/2009 7:24pm,
Run to that track, and then run home.

Seriously though, if you want to start running (and it may not be everyones cup of tea) there is a great thread on here on the proper way to slowly get yourself into running shape.

Cardio is going to be your best friend if you are looking to lose weight (in addition to a proper diet like alphafoxtrot mentioned). Running may not be the best cardio for you, but there is also cycling, swimming, and/or different martial arts programs. As much as I dislike cardio kickboxing for any kind of self-defense purpose, I think it's a good way to get people interested in a cardio program when normally they wouldn't bother.

Heavy bag work is awesome cardio by the way, especially if you have someone driving you.

TheRuss
10/28/2009 7:28pm,
I don't mean to get down on you, but I see this too often:

You weigh 235 pounds.
Assuming equivalence, this would make a push-up equivalent to (actually harder than, but let's not go there) a 117.5lb bench press rep.
You only have a hundred pounds of weight for your bench.

This is one of several reasons why buying a home bench is a bad idea.

Anyways, on-topic: see the end of this post (http://www.bullshido.net/forums/showpost.php?p=2217666&postcount=244) for what I like to call "John Berardi's 'How Not To Be A Fatass 101'". Feel free to ask any questions you may have.

pokeroo
10/28/2009 10:26pm,
Not sure how strong you are, and how much of your weight is muscle mass, but I'll assume you could lose 35 lbs of fat and still be more than 15% body fat. Try getting a jump rope. You can do that at home. At first it will be a tough skill to acquire but as you get better you can do more. Try to work out five days a week. Mix things up. To get stronger at the same time try incorporating strength training exercises into a cardio workout. Things such as lunges, body weight squats, push ups, you can use the bar you got for shoulder press. Alternate between exercises until your body gets tired. One or two days a week just go for a run. Try to keep each workout at least 30 minutes. I recommend for a diet that you follow the Canada food guide, or the U.S. food guide, or the greek food guide, or just eat only healthy fresh foods.

elipson
10/28/2009 10:30pm,
I recommend for a diet that you follow the Canada food guide, or the U.S. food guide, or the greek food guide, or just eat only healthy fresh foods. That's the first time I've heard someone suggest a government food guide as a diet plan.

Arkansan
10/28/2009 10:35pm,
Thanks for the advice, I'll digg up that thread on running and get started that way. I guess my only other question would be if my secondary goal of getting stronger would be in opposition to my primary goal of losing weight and building cardio, and if its not considering what I have at my disposal how would I go about it? Oh, by the way on keeping track of what I eat would something along the lines of a calorie journal be in order? Once again thanks for the advice.

TheRuss
10/28/2009 10:48pm,
That's the first time I've heard someone suggest a government food guide as a diet plan.

There's a reason for that. Namely, it's not a good idea.

pokeroo
10/28/2009 10:49pm,
I guess my only other question would be if my secondary goal of getting stronger would be in opposition to my primary goal of losing weight and building cardio, and if its not considering what I have at my disposal how would I go about it?

These things are not mutually exclusive, but you must make one your primary goal, and the other secondary. Adding resistance to your workouts will help you burn fat faster by stimulating your muscles. As muscles get stronger your metabolism will increase and you will burn fat more when you are at rest.

One basic way to do this is circuit training. Basically after a warm up of running or jump rope or something like that, you do set after set of alternating different resistance exercises. You don't want the resistance to be too high for this or you lose the cardio aspect. After you go through a set of everything you should take a 30 second to 2 minute break, then do them all again, and repeat for five or six times.

If you do this consistently you will get leaner and stronger.

As for what you have at your disposal, consider learning about how the military gets people into shape. With the many soldiers they have they can't do it by having them in a weight room all the time. There are books on this. But I recommend pushups, chinups, situps, squats (bodyweight only), and lots of running.

Try checking here for more ideas:
http://www.google.ca/#hl=en&source=hp&q=bodyweight+exercise+routine&btnG=Google+Search&meta=&aq=1&oq=bodyweight+exercis&fp=58363ef7d058e8ad

Arkansan
10/28/2009 10:59pm,
Thanks for the help, I'll google around a bit and see what I can come up with. Off the top of your head what would be some books you would recommend?

pokeroo
10/28/2009 10:59pm,
There's a reason for that. Namely, it's not a good idea.

What is your reasoning for food guides being useless as guides to weight loss? The biggest flaw I can see is it is hard to go from a pyramid to figuring out exactly what you are going to eat at each meal.

Some people think carbohydrate rich foods (recommended by food guides) are bad for weight loss, but I would contend that they are okay if they are from whole grain foods that are high in fiber and the diet is combined with a healthy lifestyle.

pokeroo
10/28/2009 11:08pm,
Thanks for the help, I'll google around a bit and see what I can come up with. Off the top of your head what would be some books you would recommend?

Let me first say I am no expert. I think anything that gives you exercises that are challenging, work the whole body, are all you need. Here are two books written for civilians on how to get fit using bodyweight exercises that marines also use. My second disclaimer is that I haven't read these books.

Amazon.com: Marine Corps Daily 16 Workouts: Marine Fitness for the Civilian Athlete (9780375751325): U.S. Marine Corp.: Books (http://www.amazon.com/Marine-Corps-Daily-16-Workouts/dp/0375751327/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1256788919&sr=8-1)

Amazon.com: The United States Marine Corps Workout, Revised Edition (9781578261581): Andrew Flach, Peter Field Peck: Books (http://www.amazon.com/United-States-Marine-Workout-Revised/dp/1578261589/ref=pd_sim_b_1)

I chose marine workouts because the military is in the business of getting ordinary people into extraordinary shape with minimal resources, and the marines are among the most elite of these.

TheRuss
10/28/2009 11:19pm,
What is your reasoning for food guides being useless as guides to weight loss?

Run the math on the kind of macronutrient ratios you'll get from them. You'll be stuffing yourself with starch - glucose, in other words - and running low on protein.

Lindz
10/28/2009 11:21pm,
Try this http://stronglifts.com/stronglifts-5x5-beginner-strength-training-program/ . No running required. Take a look at the rest of the site for diet info and more advanced programs when you finish the beginner one.

pokeroo
10/29/2009 1:09am,
Run the math on the kind of macronutrient ratios you'll get from them. You'll be stuffing yourself with starch - glucose, in other words - and running low on protein.

I'll do that (not here and now).

I was looking at what it says for my demographic (also the OP's) male 19 - 50 they recommend 8-10 fruit and vegetable servings, 8 servings grain products, 2 milk / alternatives, 2 meat / alternatives.

Breaking this down, if one were to have 4 meals a day, that would be the equivalent of two slices of bread, a piece of fruit and half cup of vegetalbes each meal, plus a cup of milk at two of those meals, and a serving of high protein food such as poultry beans or peanut butter at three of those meals.

I must admit, I eat way more dairy, and a little more meat but the rest is almost the same. I haven't calculated what percent of calories are from carbs, what percent protein, and what percent fat, but the diet seems pretty balanced and healthy to me.