PDA

View Full Version : Alcohol? Yes! But how?



Pages : [1] 2

MrAndrewV
10/27/2009 9:59am,
Hello friends.

I am approaching the point in my life where a night of over indulgence can start to bleed over into the week and really affect my training.

It is my understanding that it is the dehydrating effects of alcohol that cause hangovers.

I have 2 questions
1) Is this true? Is the dehydration the only short-term issue?

2) What ratio of alcohol/water is necessary to avoid a hangover?

Thank you
:hello2:

danniboi07
10/27/2009 10:28am,
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/5089.php

There's some products out there that you take before drinking to prevent a hangover. I've never tried them, but if you're willing to be our guinea pig, then leave a review later.

http://www.alcoholkiller.com/

http://www.chaserplus.com/

My personal preference is just don't drink that much. I've only gotten hangovers when I drank so much I'd puke and pass out. It's been a long time since I drank that much...similarly it's been a longtime since I've had a bad hangover. Any headaches I get in the morning are gone after a large gatorade and breakfast.

TN380
10/27/2009 10:41am,
http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/hangovers/DS00649/DSECTION=prevention

The Mayo Clinic suggests sipping water between drinks. I would suggest not drinking on nights before training. I've made that mistake and it pretty much blows.

MrAndrewV
10/27/2009 10:44am,
Lo Danniboi thanks for the response.

I'm not sure those products are available in my country.

That being said I found that first article you linked to really interesting. Thank you :)

Does any body else have any theories on the matter?

elipson
10/27/2009 3:36pm,
The key here is to keep drinking water all night while getting drunk. 1 bottle/glass of water for everything 2-3 drinks is a good ratio, but you will be pissing lots.

Before you go to bed, drink LOTS of water. And here is the trick; take a multivitamin. A big strong one, right before bed. Also, vitamin C or B vitamins if you don't have a good multivitamin. Works great for me. Also, take two ibuprofen before bed (or whatever painkiller you want) to get ahead of the hangover. And don't drink on an empty stomach!


And obviously don't drink before training.

duffman33
10/27/2009 3:45pm,
Drink good booze! The cheap stuff always gave me a much worse hangover than top shelf alcohol

Never mix alcohol through the night either. Stick to one type of cocktail or beer all night.

ViciousFlamingo
10/27/2009 4:30pm,
Also, take two ibuprofen before bed (or whatever painkiller you want) to get ahead of the hangover.!

This is bad advice. Ibuprofen and alcohol in combination increases the risks of stomach irritation and bleeding and can eventually lead to liver damage. While serious complications are unlikely without regular usage and/or high dosages, IMO it's not worth the risk given you can avoid the hangover with a little forethought.

The best tips have already been given I think, but here's the pointers in brief plus one.
- Don't stay out too late. Alcohol + no sleep = shitty recovery.
- Drink plenty of water and electrolytes before you go to sleep.
- Drink good quality alcohol.
- Drink in moderation. This means pace as well total volume.
- Don't drink the day before training.

OiScout
10/28/2009 9:35am,
And here is the trick; take a multivitamin. A big strong one, right before bed. Also, vitamin C or B vitamins if you don't have a good multivitamin.

This is the key right here. Not only does it dehydrate you, but your body uses a lot of nutrients/minerals/whatevertheshit is the help you recover. Eating helps a bit as well, assuming you can hold it down. But I mean, it really depends how much you normally drink and your tolerance levels. Some people have a low tolerance, can get buzzed/drunk quick, so they cut back/stop drinking. Their body already has enough to keep them hydrated so they wake up fine. Compared to someone who has to drink a butt ton to get anywhere, and their body simply doesn't have enough to keep up.

Supposedly that's how it goes. At least thats why it seems like some people don't get hangovers.

MrAndrewV
10/28/2009 10:33am,
Dang, lots of good advice.

And I'm glad I'm in a country where the tap water is safe to drink, and good quality alcohol isn't that expensive.

Thx guys ;)

elipson
10/28/2009 7:24pm,
Ibuprofen and alcohol in combination increases the risks of stomach irritation and bleeding and can eventually lead to liver damage. While serious complications are unlikely without regular usage and/or high dosages, IMO it's not worth the risk given you can avoid the hangover with a little forethought.

Well then acetominophen or aspirin. I just grab whatever I've got. Good to know though.

KaneElson
10/28/2009 7:45pm,
I think the real tip here is to drink in moderation.
People always complain about their hangovers and then go and drink again the next day... Drink enough to have a good time and appreciate the beverage .. any more is a waste of money.

pokeroo
10/28/2009 10:13pm,
Well then acetominophen or aspirin. I just grab whatever I've got. Good to know though.

OK, I don't have a source on hand for this but I'm the kind of guy who all kinds of info sticks in my head. First of all, don't take pain killers to get a head start on the hangover. Take the stuff the next day when you have very little alcohol left in your system to decrease your chances of liver damage.

I'm not a doctor or anything, but I'm pretty sure that all analgesics are not to be combined with alcohol. I'd go with Ibuprofen to be safest, I think acetaminophen (Tylenol) is a worse combination, and I'd be careful with Aspirin even when not hung over / drunk.

Most of everyone's advice was sound. My fave remedy for a hangover is to have fried eggs, bacon, and toast with orange juice, of course that's only if I'm not sick to my stomach, and it's probably not great if your training.

Supposedly the reason for hangovers is byproducts of the breakdown of alcohol. One of the links someone posted suggested that slight amounts of methanol in the drink are responsible, and that it doesn't break down until after the ethanol, then becomes formaldehyde. I don't think this explains all hangovers, but I think it can really explain the cheap wine headache.

I think what the OP may need to realize is that if your doing physical training, you really should limit your alcohol consumption if you want to see results. If your binging to the point of hangover its a clear sign your drinking too much.

elipson
10/28/2009 10:35pm,
Does anyone have any sources for saying that taking normal doses of analgesics while drunk could potentially cause liver damage? Cause otherwise its hearsay (no offense though, just want to be able to back this up).

I know acetominophen can destroy the liver via overdosing, and that aspirin and ibuprofen at the same time does some nasty things to the liver, but none of the packages say anything about "do not mix with alcohol".

Multivitamin. Quickest, easiest, cheapest way to help avoid hangover without being a buzzkill by saying "drink less".

ArrogantBastard
10/28/2009 10:50pm,
Does anyone have any sources for saying that taking normal doses of analgesics while drunk could potentially cause liver damage? Cause otherwise its hearsay (no offense though, just want to be able to back this up).

I know acetominophen can destroy the liver via overdosing, and that aspirin and ibuprofen at the same time does some nasty things to the liver, but none of the packages say anything about "do not mix with alcohol".

Multivitamin. Quickest, easiest, cheapest way to help avoid hangover without being a buzzkill by saying "drink less".

Pretty much every bottle I've seen for analgesics come with an alcohol warning.

But here's what a quick search showed:


Nonnarcotic pain relievers.Aspirin and similar nonprescription pain relievers are most commonly used by the elderly (5) . Some of these drugs cause stomach bleeding and inhibit blood from clotting; alcohol can exacerbate these effects (30). Older persons who mix alcoholic beverages with large doses of aspirin to self-medicate for pain are therefore at particularly high risk for episodes of gastric bleeding (19). In addition, aspirin may increase the availability of alcohol (31), heightening the effects of a given dose of alcohol.


Chronic alcohol ingestion activates enzymes that transform acetaminophen (Tylenol and others) into chemicals that can cause liver damage, even when acetaminophen is used in standard therapeutic amounts (32,33). These effects may occur with as little as 2.6 grams of acetaminophen in persons consuming widely varying amounts of alcohol (34).
source: http://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/aa27.htm


Also, I found this to be a better article on hangovers:
http://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/arh22-1/54-60.pdf


Personally, I find hydration and sleep as the biggest factors in preventing a hangover.

permahudef
10/29/2009 12:15am,
A specific word on the dehydration effects of alcohol: Ethanol suppresses vasopressin. Vasopressin naturally helps you retain water. Thus, Ethanol makes you expel water (technically making it a diuretic...dehydrating you). As long as the alcohol is in your system, it will make you expel water regardless of your hydration.

My preemtive actions are to stop drinking a few hours before I go to bed. This gives me enough time to try to hydrate with water/gatorade without fighting the peak diuretic effects of alcohol.

Most over-the-counter analgesics do not work long enough to be very effective if you take them before you go to bed, and expect them to help you in the morning. Just put your dose on your bedside table (next to your water), and take it when you first wake up in the morning. Then roll over, go back to sleep, and you'll wake up feeling the analgesic properties. You'll still have a hangover, but you won't feel the pain so much.

Try eating before bed if your hangover is more gut-related. Poutine or a pita seem to do the trick for me. I never eat poutine "unless I need it", lol. Haven't had poutine in a loooong time.

ViciousFlamingo
10/29/2009 12:32am,
Does anyone have any sources for saying that taking normal doses of analgesics while drunk could potentially cause liver damage? Cause otherwise its hearsay (no offense though, just want to be able to back this up).

I know acetominophen can destroy the liver via overdosing, and that aspirin and ibuprofen at the same time does some nasty things to the liver, but none of the packages say anything about "do not mix with alcohol".

Multivitamin. Quickest, easiest, cheapest way to help avoid hangover without being a buzzkill by saying "drink less".

Sure: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10566713
The risk of acute major upper gastrointestinal bleeding among users of aspirin and ibuprofen at various levels of alcohol consumption.


CONCLUSIONS: The findings suggest that acute UGIB is similarly associated with the use of the two most common nonprescription NSAIDs, aspirin and ibuprofen, at all levels of alcohol consumption. As heavy alcohol intake independently increases the risk, the incidence of UGIB is highest among persons who are both heavy drinkers and users of aspirin or ibuprofen.