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gsalgado7
10/19/2009 5:36pm,
I've been wondering something about the Machida fighting style. People have been talking about it as potentially revolutionizing the way people fight. Machida Karate schools popping up across the U.S., etc. But can Machida Karate really work for someone who isn't Lyoto or Chinzo?

It seems to me that a large part of the reason his stance and other aspects of Machida Karate work is because Lyoto is incredibly fast and intelligent, guessing his opponents next move. So, while Machida Karate may work for other athletically gifted individuals, can enough people make it work that is really would catch on? Sure the GSP's and Anderson Silva's of the world could do some great things with it, but what about the Joe Schmoes that populate most gyms?

While boxing teaches you how to weave and take a punch and do all kinds of other things that people will all do with varying levels of success, but nevertheless most can be taught to do with some efficiency, Machida Karate's defensive instructions are, in large part, "be amazing."

I'm not taking anything away from the style, and I understand that what he does is highly technical, but it is even more amazing because the execution of his technique is reliant on some great athletic talent. My question is, can the masses that flock to the Machida Karate schools that will hopefully be opening across the U.S. really be able to make those techniques work?

battlefields
10/19/2009 5:40pm,
Machida karate is already popular. See: Shotokan.

Hesperus
10/19/2009 6:53pm,
Machida Shotokan and that Shotokan are not the same thing.

King Sleepless
10/19/2009 6:55pm,
Machida Shotokan and that Shotokan are not the same thing.

The **** do you know? You've been doing Judo for like 8 months. ONLY Judo.

Rivington
10/19/2009 6:57pm,
It depends on whether or not pee-drinking is essential to the curriculum, and if Lyoto can generate enough pee for everyone.

hoodedmonk
10/19/2009 7:38pm,
I think Karate with Grappling can be effective, as many BS. members have already pointed out a million times. I don't think however that to many will have the success that Machida has had. As far as popularity is concerned YES I think a chain of Machida Dojos in the US would have students lining up.

Kickbox
10/19/2009 7:44pm,
I've been wondering something about the Machida fighting style. People have been talking about it as potentially revolutionizing the way people fight. Machida Karate schools popping up across the U.S., etc. But can Machida Karate really work for someone who isn't Lyoto or Chinzo?

It seems to me that a large part of the reason his stance and other aspects of Machida Karate work is because Lyoto is incredibly fast and intelligent, guessing his opponents next move. So, while Machida Karate may work for other athletically gifted individuals, can enough people make it work that is really would catch on? Sure the GSP's and Anderson Silva's of the world could do some great things with it, but what about the Joe Schmoes that populate most gyms?

While boxing teaches you how to weave and take a punch and do all kinds of other things that people will all do with varying levels of success, but nevertheless most can be taught to do with some efficiency, Machida Karate's defensive instructions are, in large part, "be amazing."

I'm not taking anything away from the style, and I understand that what he does is highly technical, but it is even more amazing because the execution of his technique is reliant on some great athletic talent. My question is, can the masses that flock to the Machida Karate schools that will hopefully be opening across the U.S. really be able to make those techniques work?

Thats been the problem all along. Individual athletes can make any art work. Bruce lee made wing chun work. Mas Oyama made karate work. People identify with the individual and then think if only I could do the same art then i could have the same results. Problem is that the champs have a strong work ethic. They train for hours every day. If you Machida like results you have to do machida like training, not just practice shotokan a few hours per week.:blob5:

Sley
10/19/2009 7:51pm,
Thats been the problem all along. Individual athletes can make any art work. Bruce lee made wing chun work. Mas Oyama made karate work. People identify with the individual and then think if only I could do the same art then i could have the same results. Problem is that the champs have a strong work ethic. They train for hours every day. If you Machida like results you have to do machida like training, not just practice shotokan a few hours per week.:blob5:

where is the proof the Bruce lee made chun work? He basically scrapped it and made funny kick boxing with Eye gouges and Crappling....

henshinx
10/19/2009 7:56pm,
Thats been the problem all along. Individual athletes can make any art work. Bruce lee made wing chun work. Mas Oyama made karate work. People identify with the individual and then think if only I could do the same art then i could have the same results. Problem is that the champs have a strong work ethic. They train for hours every day. If you Machida like results you have to do machida like training, not just practice shotokan a few hours per week.:blob5:

oyama made karate work? rofl

It is Fake
10/19/2009 9:10pm,
Thats been the problem all along. Individual athletes can make any art work. Bruce lee made wing chun work. You mean the guy that quit the chun, cross trained boxing, Judo, wrestling and TKD made it work?

Mr. Machette
10/19/2009 9:11pm,
where is the proof the Bruce lee made chun work? He basically scrapped it and made funny kick boxing with Eye gouges and Crappling....
But, you've seen Dragon right?

(j/k)

Sley
10/19/2009 9:28pm,
But, you've seen Dragon right?

(j/k)

I think he beats joint locks in that too.

Holy Moment
10/19/2009 9:39pm,
My question is, can the masses that flock to the Machida Karate schools that will hopefully be opening across the U.S. really be able to make those techniques work?


No. But the people already doing karate will still reference Machida in an effort to prove that their krotty works, even though most of them burst into tears when they take a punch to the face.

maofas
10/19/2009 10:42pm,
Yes it can work for others. A lot of what people attribute to him being fast is really just highly refined technique (no wasted movements) and sense of timing. He's not a mutant, he's just put a ****-ton of work into his MA training since an early age and is now reaping the rewards.

Most people will not/can not put that much time & effort into it, and thus you'll see very few Lyotos, but it doesn't mean they won't learn anything of value either.

Goju - Joe
10/19/2009 10:43pm,
The real comparison is between Machida Karate and Gracie Jiu Jitsu.

GJJ was revolutionary because it focused on a range of fighting that was largely ignored and built a strategy behind capitalizing on that and the gap in knowledge i.e. Everyone else going "What the **** is a triangle choke."

MK is an approach on how to use the Karate stance and training mentality mixed with solid grappling and other cross training to keep your opponent on the outside and mix foot sweeps and well timed counters to **** them up.

While he's great and I love what he's doing it won't be like the Gracie revolution.

What Machida does is not just technique but 20 years of conditioning in that style.

so unlike GJJ and BJJ which in a short span of time had many practitioners mastering the techniques MK will not have the same impact as there's only on Lyto Machida

Larus marinus
10/20/2009 12:15am,
No. But the people already doing karate will still reference Machida in an effort to prove that their krotty works, even though most of them burst into tears when they take a punch to the face.

Urgh. Yeah, I can just see it now. A Machida poster on the wall of every crappy little tippy-tappy point krotty McDojo with the 'train with us and we can make you teh UFC' sales pitch alongside...