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View Full Version : Jack Churchill - Badass of the Month - October 2009



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Eddie Hardon
10/21/2009 7:25am,
Robert Henry Cain (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Henry_Cain), was a complete badass. As were all the recipients of the Victoria Cross.

An exerpt;

Also for a living legend, Sir Renulph Fiennes (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sir_Ranulph_Fiennes).

How about Lt Gen Sir Adrian Carton De Wiart? Born in Belgium but became English including the Terribly Pukka Moustache. Died in the Republic of Cork, Ireland. His auto-biography, "Happy Voyage" doesn't even mention his Victoria Cross...Did I mention he lost a Hand in the First World War and insisted on Serving in WWII despite the initial rejection The War Office? He also was imprisoned in Italy. Blimey. What a Read.

Or that other lunatic, Lt Col Blair "Paddy" Mayne (4 x DSOs). Terrifying to his Men when he was Angry.

Craigypooh
10/21/2009 3:07pm,
Henry's army was in a parlous condition with open britches to void their Bowels of Dystentry.

The French thought the English were using poisoned arrows as many ended up with horribly infected wounds from English bowmen. But it was in fact the combination of the archers free-flowing bowels and their habit of preparing to launch a volley of shots by sticking their arrows point first in the shitty ground for easy access.

Father Dagon
10/21/2009 5:20pm,
More natural resources than India?Yeah, but can't just have the resources. They has to be available. The first railways in India was first laid out in the 1850's.

Ergo: Natural resources is the most highly overrated factor in a country's wealth. Regarding natural resources, Democratic Republic of Congo should be the richest country and Switzerland should be the poorest.

mrblackmagic
10/21/2009 6:03pm,
Claymore sword. Thanks, Tom

Eddie Hardon
10/22/2009 7:29am,
The French thought the English were using poisoned arrows as many ended up with horribly infected wounds from English bowmen. But it was in fact the combination of the archers free-flowing bowels and their habit of preparing to launch a volley of shots by sticking their arrows point first in the shitty ground for easy access.

Indeed, sir, and there were only 5,000 left in Henry's Army. He'd have conquered France had he lived...would that have been a good thing??

Anyway, I forgot to mention this chap featured (by coincidence) in yesterday's Guardian. Spence Chapman. 'Verr, verr, English, DonChaKnow'.
http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2009/oct/21/great-birdwatching-war-hero

I read his book "The Jungle is Neutral" good heavens, what a bloke. Sadly, he took his own life in later years. I also read a bio of him. Inspirational figure for so many during the Malaya campaign under Mad Mike Calvert, I'd have thought.

Remember it's the (British) gift for understatement you have to keep in Mind when reading of these characters. "Things got a bit sticky" usually means there was Blood on The Walls...

Cheers

Matyas
10/23/2009 4:21pm,
To the debate about the origins of the word "****". None of the stories are actually true. We just plain don't know.

Re4
10/23/2009 10:52pm,
yes. We don't know, in fact it's one of the oldest non-biblical words in use by modern english, and despite numerous tales of its origin, no one knows for sure when people started saying it or why.

Also, the origin of the middle finger predates the UK 'Bowfingers' gesture, because people in ancient rome were flipping each other the bird.

Lebell
10/24/2009 5:02am,
would it be pc to ever have Richard Lionheart as badass of the month?
Or Alexander the Great?

or even better: Bohemund of Tarente.

SBG-ape
10/24/2009 9:42am,
Alexander the great was a badass. The more you learn about Richard the Lionheart the less impressive he becomes. He was certainly a tough guy, but he wasn't nearly a great as his hype.

I will say that Richard was supossedly unhorsed in single combat only once in his life. Who managed to knock the lionheart on his ass? William Marshal.

Brianterrel
10/24/2009 1:54pm,
On the discussion of the origins of "****", my ancient greek professor, who was a serious linguist (our questions about greek words regularly were answered with examples from latin, old german, anglo saxon, sandskrit, and a discussion of the proto-indo-european origins of the word), favored something close to this hypothesis (quoted from wikipedia):

"The word has probable cognates (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cognate) in other Germanic languages, such as German (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/German_language) ficken (to ****); Dutch (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dutch_language) fokken (to breed, to strike, to beget); dialectal Norwegian (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Norwegian_language) fukka (to copulate), and dialectal Swedish (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swedish_language) fokka (to strike, to copulate) and fock (penis (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Penis)).[1] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/****#cite_note-oed-0) This points to a possible etymology where Common Germanic (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Common_Germanic) fuk– comes from an Indo-European (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indo-European_language) root meaning "to strike", cognate with non-Germanic words such as Latin pugnus "fist".[1] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/****#cite_note-oed-0) By reverse application of Grimm's law (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grimm%27s_law), this hypothetical root has the form *pug–"

I dig this line, as it suggests men have been walking around saying "I'd hit that!" for thousands of years.

adouglasmhor
10/24/2009 2:42pm,
André the Giant? Charles de Gaulle? Charlemagne? Charles Martel?

Charlemagne was born in Herstall = Belgique Plus probably spoke a Frankonian dialect an antecendent language of Dutch or Vlamse.

adouglasmhor
10/24/2009 2:51pm,
I'm not sure which Claymore would be more badass: The sword, the decommissioned WWI destroyer, or the antipersonnel mine which hadn't been invented yet.

In the British army claymore means a highland broadsword (or the anti personnel mine with front toward enemy on it).


http://www.williamscully.ca/gallery2/d/12528-2/swordbrochure.jpg

adouglasmhor
10/24/2009 2:56pm,
yes. We don't know, in fact it's one of the oldest non-biblical words in use by modern english, and despite numerous tales of its origin, no one knows for sure when people started saying it or why.

Also, the origin of the middle finger predates the UK 'Bowfingers' gesture, because people in ancient rome were flipping each other the bird.

It's related to the Irish Feck and German Ficke though isn't it? So before the German and English languages split from the tree.

tyciol
10/24/2009 5:08pm,
Okay, so we can't choose guys like Zaraki Kenpachi, but I think at least referencing this guy's similarity to another badass nearly as well known in the genre would be acceptable, yes?
http://blog.pucp.edu.pe/media/497/20061218-Archer-UBW.jpg

Eddie Hardon
10/26/2009 9:33am,
Good write up on Mad Jack, Phrost. I wonder what those Germans thought when they saw some guy with pipes and a Claymore coming at them?

I was once told that in WW1, the German mis-read the approaching Scots Infantry wearing kilts for a "ladies" battalion. They soon learned their mistake and allegedly forever afterwards referred to them - with a shudder - as "Ladies from Hell".

Undoubtedly a Fearsome Experience.

Changing tack, slightly, and tipping a hat toward India. Take a look at the fightingest Man in the British Army, Hope Grant, later Maj Gen Sir James Hope Grant. Asserted to be an expert in every type of hand weapon. Notably also for an almost total lack of communication (not so unusual). Man Of Action rather than Man of Words. FM Sir Garnet Wolsely (another man of lunatic bravery and major architect of Cardwell's Reforms of the 19th C. British Army, said, "Everything I learned of war, I learned from Hope Grant".

Brig John Nicholson. Absolutely Barking. Very much in the style of Robert Blair Mayne.

gotta go - work calls.

Lu Tze
10/27/2009 9:24pm,
Okay, so we can't choose guys like Zaraki Kenpachi, but I think at least referencing this guy's similarity to another badass nearly as well known in the genre would be acceptable, yes?
http://blog.pucp.edu.pe/media/497/20061218-Archer-UBW.jpgNo. No, it wouldn't. Usually I'd be swearing at you by now, but I haven't been feeling well.

Remember it's the (British) gift for understatement you have to keep in Mind when reading of these characters. "Things got a bit sticky" usually means there was Blood on The Walls...Yup... http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/1285708.stm