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yellowfin
10/07/2009 3:49pm,
I'm new here. Just registered to look for advice. I'm 32 and guessed was lucky enough to avoid fights all my life except one when I was 13/14. Got my nose bloodied by a skinny kid/former friend who studied some "kung fu", one summer. It's all blurred now, but I believe he did some kind of spinning round house kick to my face. Anyhow, I'd like to study some kung fu and go back and beat the crap out of him. Just kidding. The real reason I'm here is to learn some self defense. Don't want to go through life scared or whatever. I just started doing some research and it seem that muay thai and Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu is what I should be doing. Advice?

Blue Negation
10/07/2009 4:00pm,
There are plenty of solid options for self defense.

Muay Thai and Brazilian Jiu-jitsu are solid picks for MMA, but are by no means always going to be the best self-defense choices; especially if you aren't interested in amateur MMA competition.

It is generally recommended that you find a striking and a grappling art, at least one of which should contain clinch fighting, so here are some suggestions for each:

Striking: Boxing, Muay Thai (contains some clinch), San Shou/San Da (contains some more clinch), knockdown karate

Grappling: Judo, Sambo, Brazilian Jiu-jitsu, Combat Submission Wrestling, Wrestling, Shooto/Shootwrestling

Brazilian Jiu-jitsu probably focuses the least on the clinch of the grappling arts, so I would recommend blending it with Muay Thai or San Shou/San Da if you go the BJJ route.

If you are really concerned with Self-defense, a Filipino Martial Art such as Kali or Escrima or Arnis might be a good idea to give you some idea of how to best survive being attacked by a weapon such as a bludgeon or knife (though you'd still probably be screwed). Make sure that they actually spar and compete if you go this route, or they might just be a school full of pretenders.

If you would post your general location, we might be able to look up reputable schools in your area.

yellowfin
10/07/2009 4:10pm,
I'm in Seattle. South Seattle. There is a place call the Ring Demon that someone suggested which teaches both subject I mentioned, though to be honest, I haven't look very hard elsewhere yet.

I'm more interested in say trying to defend myself if some one is coming at me or just want to beat the crap out of me for no reason. Whether I'm at a baseball game, out w/ my girl, or whatever. No weapons involve, just old school fighting type scenario.

CrackFox
10/07/2009 4:18pm,
In that case you're probably going to be OK with anything that does sparring with a reasonably hard level of contact. In the kind of situation you've described, as long as you can weather the initial attack and not freak out or freeze like a deer in headlights, something will happen to break it up.

Blue Negation
10/08/2009 9:33am,
I'm in Seattle. South Seattle. There is a place call the Ring Demon that someone suggested which teaches both subject I mentioned, though to be honest, I haven't look very hard elsewhere yet.

I'm more interested in say trying to defend myself if some one is coming at me or just want to beat the crap out of me for no reason. Whether I'm at a baseball game, out w/ my girl, or whatever. No weapons involve, just old school fighting type scenario.

If you're in Seattle, are you anywhere near to http://www.seattle-jujutsu.org/ ? Though they do not cover striking, it has everything else you need.

yellowfin
10/08/2009 10:46am,
Thanks for the link. That place is actually quite far from me. I'm like 25mi SE of Seattle. Can someone comment if a martial art "school" is really what I'm after?

I want to learn how to defend myself in a fight and learn to throw a few punches. It seem like the school is more for someone who wants to practice the sport and/or compete. I don't want to get into a school when there's a better alternative, i.e 4 weeks self defense class.

CrackFox
10/08/2009 10:51am,
Form the description you've given, a 4 week self defence course is not what you're looking for. It really sounds like you just need something to get you used to taking a few knocks and giving some back. That comes from training regularly in a sport like environment. Taking self defence will just make you paranoid, and won't teach you how to fight at all.

I'm going to get slated by the regular posters for saying this, as it's turned into a cliché here in noobietown, but you need to do Judo (or something similar)

CrackFox
10/08/2009 11:49am,
Actually I think I should correct myself here slightly. If you were to take a short course in conflict resolution or something similar that would be a big help with defending yourself. De-escalating a situation so everyone gets to walk away is infinitely better than winning a fight.

Blue Negation
10/08/2009 12:00pm,
Form the description you've given, a 4 week self defence course is not what you're looking for. It really sounds like you just need something to get you used to taking a few knocks and giving some back. That comes from training regularly in a sport like environment. Taking self defence will just make you paranoid, and won't teach you how to fight at all.

I'm going to get slated by the regular posters for saying this, as it's turned into a cliché here in noobietown, but you need to do Judo (or something similar)

Boxing or something similar will help him learn to take hits arguably more than Judo would. I know when I took up boxing/muay thai after doing Judo for a while, at first I didn't know how to react to being hit in the face.

If you're concerned with being able to take hits and react appropriately, you need to do boxing, muay thai, or san shou. Boxing would probably be best, as it's usually cheap and you're guaranteed to get hit in the face a lot. None of that pansy shin kicking stuff. (kidding!)

Ming Loyalist
10/08/2009 12:08pm,
I know when I took up boxing/muay thai after doing Judo for a while, at first I didn't know how to react to being hit in the face.

you never got punched in the face in judo? happens to me pretty regularly, but they are still gripping my collar when they do it, so it's nice and legal (all part of kuzushi, so they say.)

seriously though, i agree that boxing is the best bet for getting used to taking a shot, but judo is best for not going to jail after the fight (yeah, yeah the menlo park guy is in jail, ok, but in general it's better to throw/pin/subdue rather than strike in the eyes of the law.)

CrackFox
10/08/2009 12:24pm,
I started off in MT before doing Judo. After doing Judo for a bit I was a lot less jumpy about people getting in my space, as it's just so more appropriate for your average shoving match, where unloading with knees and elbows just isn't appropriate.

EDIT: oh yeah, worst head-butt I ever got was in judo practice.

yellowfin
10/08/2009 12:37pm,
Thanks for all the replies. I read on a self defense that boxing is good but does not resemble most fights in the real world. The site suggests that real world fights are more like UFC. I don't watch that show but seen it a few times to know what the site is trying to suggest.

I don't want to fight. I just don't want to get the crap beat out of me if I have to fight. Avoiding a fight is obvious, but when someone is out to get you, what are you to do?

CrackFox
10/08/2009 12:43pm,
Is somebody out to get you?

Also while boxing/UFC is not exactly like a real fight, it's a lot more like one than what you will find in the average self-defence class. The main thing you'll get from it is getting used to taking a hit and not giving up.

Blue Negation
10/08/2009 1:16pm,
If you just want to be able to defend yourself reasonably, boxing and Judo are all you need. Check out your local YMCA; often both are offered at those establishments.

yes, MMA covers more of the possibilities of a fight; but it's also often unreasonably expensive and covers things that aren't necessary for someone just concerned with self-defense to know.

Boxing: Teaches you how to not go into shock when punched hard; teaches you to evade punches by slipping/bobbing/weaving; teaches you proper evasive footwork and how to avoid being cornered; teaches you how to give solid punches - not necessarily to the head either; a body shot is great for SD and doesn't look too bad if the police arrive. Also: gives you great cardiovascular fitness. Less risk of heart disease is a great bonus.

Judo: teaches you how to stay on your feet and move to minimize the openings you present to be taken down; teaches you to control the clinch and quickly throw from it; teaches you to avoid being thrown; teaches you how to immobilize, choke, or armlock someone on the ground; teaches some basic escapes on the ground. Also: gives you burst-of-power capabilities (anaerobic as opposed to boxing's aerobic).

Between the two of them, they offer answers to pretty much any kind of scuffle or brawl.

yellowfin
10/08/2009 1:39pm,
Is somebody out to get you?

Also while boxing/UFC is not exactly like a real fight, it's a lot more like one than what you will find in the average self-defence class. The main thing you'll get from it is getting used to taking a hit and not giving up.

No, no ones out to get me. If someone was, I carry a conceal weapons most time anyhow.

It's more for self confidence. You understand? Just something I'd like to scratch off the bucket list.

I'm a family man now and it would be nice to be able to protect them if push comes to shove.

meataxe
10/08/2009 1:49pm,
If you just want to be able to defend yourself reasonably, boxing and Judo are all you need. Check out your local YMCA; often both are offered at those establishments.

yes, MMA covers more of the possibilities of a fight; but it's also often unreasonably expensive and covers things that aren't necessary for someone just concerned with self-defense to know.

Boxing: Teaches you how to not go into shock when punched hard; teaches you to evade punches by slipping/bobbing/weaving; teaches you proper evasive footwork and how to avoid being cornered; teaches you how to give solid punches - not necessarily to the head either; a body shot is great for SD and doesn't look too bad if the police arrive. Also: gives you great cardiovascular fitness. Less risk of heart disease is a great bonus.

Judo: teaches you how to stay on your feet and move to minimize the openings you present to be taken down; teaches you to control the clinch and quickly throw from it; teaches you to avoid being thrown; teaches you how to immobilize, choke, or armlock someone on the ground; teaches some basic escapes on the ground. Also: gives you burst-of-power capabilities (anaerobic as opposed to boxing's aerobic).

Between the two of them, they offer answers to pretty much any kind of scuffle or brawl.

This is good advice and you would probably find it to be a lot of fun too.