PDA

View Full Version : Need your opinion guys, maybe grapple ?



Pages : [1] 2

honest_truth
9/11/2009 8:24pm,
A bit of info on me, i practiced MT for a short while, took september off to get my school scheduling stuff done and get back into the educational mindset.

I still have 2 months on my clubs contract, Oct and Nov, December will also be taken off to accommodate my finals. After that starting Jan i am free and thought of taking up judo or wrestling instead (judo probably).

BUT THEN

something caught my eye today at my universities athletic website: Beginners Grappling.


Grappling has long since proved its value in combat sport arenas and should be considered a necessary aspect of self-defense training. This class will start building the student's grappling foundation by teaching a core of techniques drawn from both Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu and Submission Wrestling. The course material will include joint locks, chokes and control positions as well techniques for getting opponents to the ground and how to fall properly. In addition we'll be covering some basic stretching and exercise routines in order to enhance the student's ability to perform the techniques being taught and to help keep our training safe. Classes will be tough but everyone is encouraged to workout at their own pace and ask questions whenever necessary. This class is best suited for those with little or no grappling experience; however, those with prior training who are looking for a review are more than welcome. I hope to see you on the mats. I tried to ask who the instructor was but they didnt have his name in the data base, the classes are recreational because its only once a week, 1.5 hours each time. So i get 12 classes for $70 American (after taxes and stuff)

Does that sound like a fair price and should i give this a shot in the mean time until Jan ?

(if you are an Ottawa bully, this is offered in CU)

hungryjoe
9/11/2009 8:29pm,
Price is good.

Probably not much more than you'd pay for a month of judo.

Consider finding out more about the class before you commit.

Hesperus
9/11/2009 11:20pm,
The fact that they included "how to fall properly" gets points with me.

hungryjoe
9/11/2009 11:33pm,
The fact that they included "how to fall properly" gets points with me.

The importance of which cannot be over emphasised.

Wherever you choose, make sure you learn how to fall correctly.

honest_truth
9/12/2009 12:06am,
The importance of which cannot be over emphasised.

Wherever you choose, make sure you learn how to fall correctly.
learned this the hard way, fell on my shoulder at an angle and tore the muscles where the deltoid meets the bicep and tricep.

animlmthr
9/12/2009 12:10am,
if it fits your schedule, I would definitely go for it. Once a week kinda sucks but for $70, it ain't bad.

honest_truth
9/12/2009 7:46pm,
if it fits your schedule, I would definitely go for it. Once a week kinda sucks but for $70, it ain't bad.

Its $70 for the semester, which is 3 months, thats how it cracks to 12 classes.

unfortunately its on a tuesday evening, right when my MT classes are (which happen 5 times a week) however mondays and tuesdays are our clinching days, and on mondays i have a full classes schedule till 9 PM, so i might be missing out on my clinching classes for EVAR.

I am not expecting to hit the ground running when i start judo, but at least hit the ground rolling instead of falling at painful angles straight on my neck.

Some guys at my MT club do wrestling and BJJ, so i can roll with them after classes on some mats if any are willing to start out a bit slow.

Neo Sigma
9/12/2009 7:56pm,
I am not expecting to hit the ground running when i start judo, but at least hit the ground rolling instead of falling at painful angles straight on my neck.


This shouldn't be a concern if you're worried about getting hurt when you start judo. Your first few classes are probably going to be nothing but practicing ukemi until your sensei thinks you won't get yourself killed the first time you get tossed.

sambosteve
9/12/2009 8:22pm,
Looks like a good deal. The description seems solid and realistic about what noobs to grappling should cover. Good price, I say do it. If you find out who is teaching, post that info please.

permahudef
9/13/2009 1:38pm,
See also:
Ottawa Grappling?? - No BS MMA and Martial Arts (http://www.bullshido.net/forums/showthread.php?t=35236)
http://www.sherdog.net/forums/f12/grappling-ottawa-606073/
http://www.sherdog.net/forums/f12/bjj-clubs-ottawa-948833/
Worldwide Grappling Forums - Ottawa, Looking for a Dojo (http://www.worldwidegrappling.com/grappling/html/modules/vB/showthread.php?t=1466)

honest_truth
9/13/2009 2:49pm,
See also:
Ottawa Grappling?? - No BS MMA and Martial Arts (http://www.bullshido.net/forums/showthread.php?t=35236)
http://www.sherdog.net/forums/f12/grappling-ottawa-606073/
http://www.sherdog.net/forums/f12/bjj-clubs-ottawa-948833/
Worldwide Grappling Forums - Ottawa, Looking for a Dojo (http://www.worldwidegrappling.com/grappling/html/modules/vB/showthread.php?t=1466)

Sounds good, however, i will tell you my #1 issue with MA: Price.

I knew about Ronin and OAMA, great schools no doubt, but i never found prices on their website, so i assume its expensive.

http://www.racentre.com/raweb/E/Sports/Judo.html

$165 per 3 months or so, and $435 for a year, so this goes to roughly $50 a month.

If OAMA or Ronin offer classes for ~$50 a month then i will consider checking out that place, otherwise i would stay at my current club and hope i never get taken down if i ever have to use it on T3H S7R337

permahudef
9/13/2009 7:19pm,
Ah, then might as well sign up for the grappling. Pretty decent price to round out your skills a little bit. You should be able to tell if it's dead training I assume.

honest_truth
9/13/2009 8:20pm,
Ah, then might as well sign up for the grappling. Pretty decent price to round out your skills a little bit. You should be able to tell if it's dead training I assume.

flow drilling locks, not rolling against resisting opponent trying to submit me etc etc.

1) see technique
2) drill
3) drill with added resistance
4) roll (lightly as a noob, dont spaz, concentrate on getting the position)

am i doing this right ?

honest_truth
9/15/2009 9:36pm,
Okay, i am back from my first class

the trainers name is Jeremy Tanner, he has been in Ottawa only a month and still isnt signed as an instructor at our fulltime MMA / sub-grap clubs, although he said he used to have his own club in Philadelphia.

So the classes started with a warmup on arms and legs, hips etc etc, then we started running in circles.

then he taught us how to roll forwards and back wards the proper way, along your arm, on your shoulder and then down your spine instead of upfront rolling on your head and neck.

then he taught us what a closed guard is, how to do one and made a point that you cross your ankles high up on someones back and try to maintain arm and head control if possible, keep your hands tucked in, he also stressed the importance of tapping often and making sure the safety of opponent comes before trying to get a submission.

from there he taught us how to do an armbar from the guard, pull the arm of opponent across your body holding his triceps, maintain head contol and pull in the same direction to break his posture. the side of arm you are pulling, put your foot on his hip and turn at a 90 angle, then lock your legs again, try to get some distance between your self and opponent to make raising your leg easier later on AKA dont get stacked by his weight on you right on top.

from there push your opponents head away, raise your leg and clamp it down on his head/neck area, squeeze your knees together, but dont cross your ankles because then you would be opening up your knees a bit. from there with the hand that was pushing the head grab the forearms and move your other hand up and try to grab him by the hand/wrist area near the thumb, wrapping your thumb around his and keeping your opponents thumb pointing up. the power in the move comes more from raising your hips up while bridging and clamping down/pushing on the head instead of trying to pull the opponents arm back completely.

we drilled this 5 times both sides with partner, and then switched, rinse and repeat.

then he went into explaining how to pass guard into side control with the same step-by-step method going into great detail on what to do, how to do it, why move in a certain order and how you could get caught in a half-guard if you dont, we drilled that the same way. then he taught a kimura keylock, drilled it etc etc.

After that we did some live rolling for 2 minutes, where one time i started on the bottom, and then each tried to do his moves (i tried to do a guillotine choke i was taught from before) and then second roll i was on top trying to work my moves, managed to roll my opponent over when he prematurely opened his guard and raised his leg to my head trying to force it down, rolled him on his knees then went on his back, sunk in 1 hook, got an arm around his neck and he immediately tapped before i did anything else.

then we did some more stretching / cooling down, put the mats away and called it night.

i would have liked to train more, also i found a big attention to detail, my partner was an older guy who does CMA / Taichi, we went at a good pace, i am injured now so i dont want some wrestler tearing my muscles again or a meat head MMA fan trying to pop my elbow, we tapped often and were respectful, there were a couple of chicks too but i was busy trying to not get keylocked and didnt have the time to enjoy watching 2 hotties in tights and tank tops rolling around and giggling, oh well :(

overall, i really enjoyed the class and will try to roll lightly with the guys at my MT club who cross train. When i approached him after class he said he used to strike and knows it takes time to get used to moving your hips and body in certain ways (i am an awkward penguin when rolling, have a phobia in being upside down as well, but i will try to work this out and get used to rolling), he started grappling in 1999, then started seriously doing it in 2001

So, what do you guys think, legit ?

2groggy
9/16/2009 10:53pm,
The price is good. The instruction and general attitude sound safe. The attention to detail is good. For that price, you can't go too far wrong. for a whopping $70 US, the real question is "do you enjoy it?" I say take it this term and see how it goes.

What might be missing is experienced opponents. Being a perpetual beginner, I find that I learn the most from rolling with a far superior opponent. Your class sounds like everyone is a grappling beginner.

On the other hand, with everyone being beginners, there may be less spazzing by beginners trying to hold their own against experts.

I've gone through the transition from grappling noob to judo noob. Note that there are different rule sets, which change things a bit. For example, in BJJ, I preferred to work from my back, waiting for mistakes, to attack with submissions. In Judo, the ruleset doesn't afford such patience. And current judo rules (in Canada, at least) don't allow chokes or subs in competition below blue belt.

honest_truth
9/17/2009 1:30am,
The price is good. The instruction and general attitude sound safe. The attention to detail is good. For that price, you can't go too far wrong. for a whopping $70 US, the real question is "do you enjoy it?" I say take it this term and see how it goes.

What might be missing is experienced opponents. Being a perpetual beginner, I find that I learn the most from rolling with a far superior opponent. Your class sounds like everyone is a grappling beginner.

On the other hand, with everyone being beginners, there may be less spazzing by beginners trying to hold their own against experts.

I've gone through the transition from grappling noob to judo noob. Note that there are different rule sets, which change things a bit. For example, in BJJ, I preferred to work from my back, waiting for mistakes, to attack with submissions. In Judo, the ruleset doesn't afford such patience. And current judo rules (in Canada, at least) don't allow chokes or subs in competition below blue belt.

I think at my MT club there was a guy who competed in NAGA, i enjoy it and plan to practice more with the more experienced guys at my MT club while getting the training in from the classes.

i dont expect to learn much or become good, however a little understanding will buffer the initial shock when i start grappling more seriously instead of striking.