PDA

View Full Version : Noobthread #98567



Pages : [1] 2

deadrockstar
6/10/2009 12:05pm,
Hi there,

I'm a 20 y/o guy from Belgium, and I've been training in the BBT for almost a year now. I've read countless threads here about it, learned a lot and had quite a few laughs. To be honest, i don't give a crap about ninja's, lineage etc., I just like the training. What I do give a crap about is serious training. In my Dojo in Antwerp we train 2x3hrs a week and as I've said, I really enjoy the taijutsu and the weapon techniques, but most of all, I find it's lack of sparring disturbing!
The whole discussion has already been held a gazillion times on this forum ("it's ineffective bullshit" vs. "it's too deadly to be done fast") While it's true that full speed sparring can result in serious injuries and you've got to learn by starting slow, in a real fight it'll probably be the first time I have to use the techniques at full speed. Pretty crappy preparation, if you ask me.

So that's why I'm looking for something to fill up that full contact-gap by cross-training. The only problem is ofc I don't really know what other style (this is where you guys come in). I've done a few years of judo too, but grappling and groundfighting are not really my cup of tea. I'm not interested in becoming some beefed up MMA fighter (i'm a pretty small guy) relying on muscle. I'm looking for a style that's effective in a real fight (ofc), is mainly about (nerve) strikes and kicks, and has some weapon training too.

I've been looking at Wing Chun, but there aren't really any decenbt clubs around it seems.
I've also looked at Escrima, it looks impressive but is the unarmed part as effective as the armed stuff? There's a club nearby that looks pretty reliable (it's part of The IKAEF)
There's also a "Shaolin Kempo" club in my neighboorhood, i'm pretty suspicious about it, does anybody know anything about this?

If anyone has any other suggestions: let's hear it!

Thanks

v1y
6/10/2009 1:17pm,
See, the problem is that you think relying on grappling is a bad idea, but that relying on kicks and nerve strikes is a good idea.

With that said, if you really don't want to grapple, go do some boxing or muay thai.

ignatzami
6/10/2009 1:22pm,
deadrockstar,

If your looking for an effective style to cross train in I'm going to make a few comments, then a few suggestions.

One, Wing Chun is a lot of things, effective is not it. You will encounter little to no sparring, and fewer usable techniques.

Two, Escrima can be effective if taught in an alive manner with adequate sparring. However, do you really want to learn a weapons based art? How often do you carry a blade? What are the legal ramifications of knifing someone in Belgium?

Three, LOL, Ke?po. I would say avoid the "Shaolin Kempo" club on principle.

Now, on to suggestions.

Boxing.

If you want an effective, useful, martial art to study Boxing is it. It's cheap, tends to be widely available, and is certainly effective. Also, it dovetails nicely with your no Grappling bias. Muay Thai is another effective art with a kicking focus. Though it will be harder to find then boxing.

Don't worry about becoming "beefed up" any effective art that you train hard will build muscle, that's not a bad thing, just train and eat right and enjoy life.

Recap: Do Boxing. Or, Muay Thai if you can find it.

Josh_Grant
6/10/2009 1:31pm,
The first suggestion that would come to mind is Kenpo. It's a got a good stand up game and relies on speed and accuracy of the strikes.

This Shaolin kempo you mention, do they have a website? Why are you suspicious of them?

Also look for Kung Fu San Soo- though many instructors are light on the sparring.

Most of the dedicated Striking arts will have some form of sparring and will usually emphasize targeting, if they're any good. Good luck!

Josh

Matt Phillips
6/10/2009 1:43pm,
Muaythai is very effective in a real fight, and its bread-and-butter techniques often rely on attacking the sciatic nerve.

Krabi Krabong and Dog Brothers stickfighting are two arts that mix weapons training and Thai-style kicking.

Tonuzaba
6/10/2009 1:48pm,
...If anyone has any other suggestions: let's hear it!...
First off: welcome to the best MA-related website on the planet!

Second, a personal suggestion: since you're in Belgium, make yourself available on Saturday, October 3rd 2009, as there will be a meeting and training afternoon (so called Throwdown) by several Bullshido members from all over Europe (and maybe even from behind the Great waters) in Leuven:

http://www.bullshido.net/forums/showthread.php?t=83763

See you there and good luck either way!

Rene "Zendokan" Gysenbergs
6/10/2009 2:21pm,
Welcome to Bullshido.Net, deadrockstar.

Try Muay Thai.

And I hope to see you at the TD (I'm organizing it) :thumbsup:.

Greetz,

Zendokan

NJM
6/10/2009 3:09pm,
is mainly about (nerve) strikes and kicks
I'm very sorry, but there is no such style that fits these parameters that is also effective.

deadrockstar
6/11/2009 4:33am,
Hey, everyone. Thanks for the advice, when my exams are over, I'm gonna make a dojo-tour around Antwerp and get a taste of some styles :)

Also, i'll be there in Leuven for the TD, sounds very cool!

Tonuzaba
6/11/2009 5:31am,
Hey, everyone. Thanks for the advice, when my exams are over, I'm gonna make a dojo-tour around Antwerp and get a taste of some styles :)

Also, i'll be there in Leuven for the TD, sounds very cool!
Great, you won't regret!

Otaku Waffle
6/11/2009 12:43pm,
deadrockstar,

Two, Escrima can be effective if taught in an alive manner with adequate sparring. However, do you really want to learn a weapons based art? How often do you carry a blade? What are the legal ramifications of knifing someone in Belgium?

Deadrockstar, is that Charles Goossens' club you'd be training at (in Mortsel}?
Charles is a good teacher (and knows how to pour a beer but that's another story.) though I don't know how regularly they spar at his club.
ignatzami: even carrying a knife, ANY knife is Verboten in Belgium. Stabbing someone in self-defense is a nono, legally speaking.


Boxing.

If you want an effective, useful, martial art to study Boxing is it. It's cheap, tends to be widely available, and is certainly effective. Also, it dovetails nicely with your no Grappling bias. Muay Thai is another effective art with a kicking focus. Though it will be harder to find then boxing.

This being Belgium, you can switch those 2 arts around concerning price and availability. And Holland is close. :)

Tonuzaba
6/11/2009 2:25pm,
...even carrying a knife, ANY knife is Verboten in Belgium...
I was going to ask about this before packing my everyday carry knife into the luggage to fly for the Leuven TD...

You really can't even carry a concealed non-assisted opening small pocketknife?

What the f*ck am I going to make myself the sandwiches during my poor-man's stay in Belgium?

Otaku Waffle
6/11/2009 2:51pm,
Are we talking Swiss army knife here?
You can get away with that but if you'd brandish it, you'd get looked at as if you're wielding a bowie knife.

Tonuzaba
6/12/2009 2:27am,
Not swiss and not army, but of that kind... ;-)

Is there any limitation as to the blade length?

Otaku Waffle
6/12/2009 4:55am,
Not officially, there isn't.
But Belgian law and Application of Belgian law by moody cop often differ quite radically.
The officious guideline is that the bladelength shouldn't exceed the breadth of the palm of your hand (or the length of a bank card for a less discriminatory guideline).

slideyfoot
6/14/2009 6:14am,
Welcome to Bullshido!


I'm a 20 y/o guy from Belgium

Cool: wish I could make the Leuven TD myself, but financial problems at the mo are liable to prevent that. Which is a shame, as I'd love to go back to Belgium (haven't returned since I was born there), because I'd love to check out all the fantastic examples of the Northern Renaissance there.


So that's why I'm looking for something to fill up that full contact-gap by cross-training. The only problem is ofc I don't really know what other style (this is where you guys come in). I've done a few years of judo too, but grappling and groundfighting are not really my cup of tea. I'm not interested in becoming some beefed up MMA fighter (i'm a pretty small guy) relying on muscle. I'm looking for a style that's effective in a real fight (ofc), is mainly about (nerve) strikes and kicks, and has some weapon training too. First of all, I'd recommend you take a look at the FAQ (http://www.bullshido.org/Finding_a_good_martial_arts_school) on finding a good martial arts school. In general, signs to look for are a competitive record, regular heavy contact sparring and 'aliveness' (if you're unfamiliar with the term, Matt Thornton has a long article (http://aliveness101.blogspot.com/2005/07/why-aliveness.html) on the topic describing what it is and why it's important: he is the man most associated with popularising the concept).

If your interest is mainly in striking, the safest option if you want decent training is muay thai (which you'll also see as 'thai boxing'), along with martial arts like boxing and kyokushin karate. That's not to say there aren't good schools within other striking styles, but they tend to vary widely in quality.

I would suggest you don't rule out grappling: I'm also a small guy with no interest in becoming a beefed up guy reliant on muscle, but love BJJ. It would be an excellent choice, as the strong competitive element and ability-based ranking system generally results in high quality training. A cheaper option is judo, which is also much easier to find - the two styles are closely related, the main difference being that judo normally focuses on throws whereas BJJ is mostly about the ground. For more on judo, read the Bullshido.com article (http://www.bullshido.com/articles/judo-6.html) - there is an article on BJJ (http://www.bullshido.com/articles/brazilian-jiu-jitsu-style-information-without-the-bs-2.html) too (you could also check my BJJ Beginner FAQ (http://slideyfoot.blogspot.com/2006/10/bjj-beginner-faq.html)). SAMBO is another good choice, but even harder to find than BJJ. Then there's wrestling, which is also great training for grappling.

Alternately, you could combine grappling and striking by cross-training in several arts, or at an MMA gym (though technically 'MMA' is a ruleset rather than a specific style). Examples of well known MMA gyms would be Team Quest (http://www.tqfc.com/) and Miletich Fighting Systems (http://miletichnewyork.com/).

Finally, you could try having a look through the dojo reviews (http://www.bullshido.net/forums/forumdisplay.php?f=83) section, which might yield something more specific to your area. Alternately, you could try a Google site search, either off the Google toolbar, or by typing site:www.bullshido.net (http://www.bullshido.net) into Google, followed by the area (i.e., site:www.bullshido.net (http://www.bullshido.net) london).

There are also several school databases you could try. For example, for BJJ:

TrainJiuJitsu.com (http://www.trainjiujitsu.com/bjj/)
Gym Database (http://www.gymdb.com/) (BJJ, MMA etc)
UK Club Map (http://slideyfoot.blogspot.com/2000/01/uk-bjj-club-list.html)