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beardedtaco
6/08/2009 5:36am,
Hi there.

Thought it was about time I started posting instead of just reading.

I am currently training at Jiujitsu77's mma gym here in Johannesburg. I have been training there since January ( Boxing, Muay Thai, Greco Roman, BJJ ).

Before that I have trained about 8 years between Shaolin Kung Fu and Yang style Taijiquan. I then did 2 years of Progressive Fighting Systems and dabbled with a lot of other FMA stuff that I watched on videos. Did stickfighting with a friend in the backyard which was a LOT of fun ( fencing masks and gloves ). I feel like I just scratched the surface of what FMA has to offer, but now the mma training is taking up my time.

A very good friend of mine had been talking about Jiujitsu77's gym for a while, saying that it was the best place in the area to train mma, and more specifically, BJJ. We made a pact between 3 of us that we would start at the beginning of this year, and although we almost didn't go through with it until the last minute, I'm so glad that I made the plunge. It's a great gym with some really great people there. I have learned a LOT in the few months I have been there, and have made a lot of new friends. I look forward to every class.

Anyways, that's me. peace.

Robstafarian
6/08/2009 6:55am,
Welkom na Bullshido!*

Glad you've been able to find solid training, especially after learning from videos. Maybe you could start a Suid-Afrikaner* "Forever Fat" style thing to give us all an understanding of what the training options are there.


*I know a most excellent individual who's fluent in Afrikaans, though I put these together via computer translation.

beardedtaco
6/09/2009 2:54am,
Baie dankie, Rob.

My Afrikaans is not too hot, unfortunately.


Maybe you could start a Suid-Afrikaner* "Forever Fat" style thing

Please explain.


Glad you've been able to find solid training, especially after learning from videos.

Yes, it is a good feeling to train at a good school. The FMA training, I did get a little "in person" help, though not ideal. Some friends of mine used to be students under a guy who is a PFS assistant instructor under Paul Vunak. They taught me the basic 2 person stick drills and then I watched a lot of videos and we sparred in the garden. Cool thing though, I had never actually met their instructor, but heard a lot about him from them. Now after starting at the mma gym, I find out he is training BJJ at our gym and is one of our purple belts. He is a very humble and cool person and always willing to help me with my ground game.

Video training, really not the best thing, but if it wasn't for some of the stuff I saw on videos ( eg: Bas Rutten, Mario Sperry, Mark Kerr, Randy Couture, etc. ), I might not have ended up in this school now.

Anyways, thanks for the welcome.

Robstafarian
6/09/2009 12:04pm,
Please explain.

Part One: Forever Fat; A lifetime of bulldinkietwinkies (http://www.bullshido.net/forums/showthread.php?t=65354)

Part Two: Forever Fat II; Still livin' life, Still eatin' bulldinkietwinkies (http://www.bullshido.net/forums/showthread.php?t=84205)


Enjoy them in good health, but keep in mind you'll be reading for quite a while. Also note that you shouldn't read anything in these threads while consuming food, most especially liquids.

Ike
6/09/2009 2:01pm,
Who was your PFS Instructor? I'm a PFS guy myself and would like to know your opinion of the training and how it compares to your MMA experience.

beardedtaco
6/09/2009 3:40pm,
Hey Ike,

Like I said, I didn't learn PFS from the instructor. That's why it was not ideal. I learnt some basics from 2 of his students who are good friends of mine ( they did not act like they were proper teachers or anything, just some friends helping out a friend with an itch ). I then watched and studied most of the old series of Paul Vunak instructional videos, which after a few months of getting used to the drills and movements, led to free sparring with sticks and rubber knifes in my back garden for just under 2 years. Their instructor's name is Sergio DeFreitas. He is an apprentice instructor in PFS. He went to train with Vunak in person. I only met him after joining the mma gym I'm at now. I had no idea it was the same guy till later when I heard him talking about his school and connected the dots. Apparently he still teaches a group of about 16 people, and comes to our school to train bjj.

Sorry, I know, more information than you asked for, but I think it's relevant to your question about my opinions of the PFS training vs the mma training I'm doing now. I never had personal instruction in PFS from a certified instructor, just some of his students, so I don't feel I can really compare this to learning mma in person with certified teachers.

With that being said, PFS training opened my mind up to a lot of things I had been close minded about up until that point. I was especially impressed with the way he ( Vunak ) teaches to fight in the clinch. It was the first time I had seen something like that.

Ultimately, it was Paul Vunak's videos that led to a huge change in the direction of my MA training. It was also in one of his videos that I saw bjj for the first time.

If I had to join a JKD kinda school anytime in the future, I would most likely check out PFS. Sergio said that he could help me out with the PFS stuff sometime, but I am so busy now learning the mma game that I don't know when this will be. At least I get to roll with him every now and then. He demonstrated some Dumog stuff on us the one time which was very cool.

Any other questions, I am glad to answer if I can.

Ike
6/09/2009 4:22pm,
I'm an apprentice instructor as well. I was just wondering. I am on track for a Phase One within a year or so, and I have had experience with various JKD instructors (PFS and non-PFS alike) and I've noticed quite a variance in quality.

You're best off sticking to MMA and finding a Phase One or Full Instructor after a few years of good striking and grappling training. PFS JKD serves as either a good introduction to functional fighting (as a launching point) or a great way to expand on your previously trained Muay Thai/BJJ/Wrestling repertoire. I think the primary difference between MMA and good PFS JKD is the scope of MA techniques-- PFS will introduce you Flipino boxing and wrestling, savate, sambo, silat, even tai chi, as well as weapons, "dirty tactics", and mass attack.

beardedtaco
6/09/2009 4:30pm,
You're best off sticking to MMA and finding a Phase One or Full Instructor after a few years of good striking and grappling training.

I think that he is the only PFS instructor of any kind in the country. I could be wrong, but I've never heard of anyone else here. I should add that he does not advertise his school or style as PFS. He teaches a mix of what he has learned over the years. He was a very good kickboxer for much of his MA career. He went to train with Vunak quite a few years ago, and I think his personal focus is now on BJJ.


PFS will introduce you Flipino boxing and wrestling, savate, sambo, silat, even tai chi, as well as weapons, "dirty tactics", and mass attack.

I was practicing Taijiquan at the time that I started playing with the sticks and watching some of Vunak's applications for Taiji was something that struck a chord with me.

Ike
6/09/2009 4:33pm,
One last question: What's Sergio's last name?

beardedtaco
6/09/2009 5:20pm,
I gave his full name in post #6.

Ike
6/09/2009 5:47pm,
My bad. Unless his status has changed and Vunak's crew didn't update it (I'm not up there, but I am an Apprentice under Duane Walden and Eddie Quan), he's still an Apprentice Instructor, which means that Sergio probably had approximately 10 hours of direct, semi-private instruction.