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View Full Version : I claim to be a Vegan. I don't know what the frak that means, but I know I'm right!!!



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TxSanshou
4/27/2009 9:55pm,
Hello all I have been a vegan my whole life but I have heard from people who made the switch to the vegan diet from a more conventional diet and experienced an increase in energy and faster recovery from injuries.

If any of you have had any experiences with the vegan diet that you would like to share or any questions about it feel free to post. God bless

JohnnyCache
4/27/2009 11:46pm,
I've heard the opposite from everyone but vegans. We're made to eat a balanced, omnivorous diet.

1point2
4/27/2009 11:59pm,
This is going to degenerate very quickly, but although I disagree with the OP, there is a small grain of similarity to a fragment of something resembling truth in what he says.

To wit: when I eat a large amount of longer-to-digest meat, particularly red meat, it can make me feel sluggish. This is an extreme, however. Making my lunch a foot-long meatball parmesan for lunch...or piles of roast beef and cheese with mayo...or large amounts of pasta with a chicken breast...all after starving through the night and into the morning, then returning to a desk, is of course going to make me feel tired and slow.

But faster to recover? Vegans are more likely to have iron and protein deficiencies. If you go from a poorly managed, two-meals-a-day, processed-pasta-and-meat diet to a rational, multiple-meals, more-veggies, omnivorous diet, yes you will get an increase in energy. Connecting that to veganism is wrongheaded conflation due to a desired outcome from the data, aka, selection bias.

Last_Samurai
4/28/2009 12:00am,
Balance seems wise. Plus, you need a shitload of calcium and protein to become strong. It is a **** around trying to get it anywhere but an animal.

Last_Samurai
4/28/2009 12:07am,
To wit: when I eat a large amount of longer-to-digest meat, particularly red meat, it can make me feel sluggish. This is an extreme, however. Making my lunch a foot-long meatball parmesan for lunch...or piles of roast beef and cheese with mayo...or large amounts of pasta with a chicken breast...all after starving through the night and into the morning, then returning to a desk, is of course going to make me feel tired and slow.Well isn;t this just a common sense thing? I mean, I feel the same thing, so I don't eat heavy food at morning or midday. I like fruit and cereal for breakfast (milk included). Lunch is a bit heavier and with some good carbs, maybe a nice salad sandwhich with some chicken in it or something. A nice sized one, but, you know, just not too heavy stuff. Then for tea I eat the heavy roast beef and potatoes and stuff; the stuff that puts you to sleep at night.

Of course I'm not going to eat a roast buffalo just before training, yet who cares if you feel sluggish at night?

EmetShamash
4/28/2009 12:51am,
I believe humans are capable of thriving on very diverse diets. History shows this, looking at other societies shows this, and I am told that fossil evidence shows this (but I don't understand a word of the fossil stuff).

I will say that as a vegan for a few years I haven't had any of the adverse problems that many people here say are supposed to happen. I will agree that it may be like 1point2 says in that it was going from junkfood to a much better managed diet, but still I do pretty good. When I workout regularly and eat healthy I make good gains. My recovery is great, my energy is great, and I have never felt better.

The more I study nutrition and listen to a larger range of opinions the more I realize that eating meat is not inherently unhealthy. Though the way in which most people eat meat in the US is pretty unhealthy.

Is there anything in particular that you are looking for by way of asking people's opinions on their experience with a vegan diet? I can't really say much by way of knowing how good my recovery time is since going vegan, but I think it is better from the small comparisons I can make. My energy level is the same as far as I can tell though.

It is easy to find lots of people who have wonderful success being vegan athletes.

http://www.veganbodybuilding.com/
http://www.veganbrothersiniron.com/
http://www.veganpersonaltraining.com/

Last_Samurai
4/28/2009 12:55am,
I believe humans are capable of thriving on very diverse diets. History shows this, looking at other societies shows this, and I am told that fossil evidence shows this (but I don't understand a word of the fossil stuff).What good human society was vegans for long time? Or even vegetarian?

If you look at other other animal herbivores, it is most common that their food is so little nourishing that they have to spend the vast majority of their day eating non stop, and often have multiple stomachs and swallow rocks and **** all to help break it down fast enough...

adouglasmhor
4/28/2009 3:47am,
What good human society was vegans for long time? Or even vegetarian?

If you look at other other animal herbivores, it is most common that their food is so little nourishing that they have to spend the vast majority of their day eating non stop, and often have multiple stomachs and swallow rocks and **** all to help break it down fast enough...

One - we cook most of our food so we don't need extra stomachs and rocks to break it down.
Two - Omnivores and Carnivores spend most of their time resting before pouncing on prey, watch a big cat or wolves on documentary, Watch really primitive societies like Kalahari Bushmen, they do the same...
Three - the only mostly veggie society I have much time for is Sikhism, there may be others.


You can live perfectly healthy on a vegan or veggie diet, you have to put the work in to get it balanced - protein combining grains and pulses and nuts etc., omnivorous and balanced is the way to go IMO, you can be very unhealthy on an omnivorous diet too.
http://www.raw-living-food-success.com/images/protein.gif
or
http://www.thesun.co.uk/sol/homepage/news/article2399352.ece

Skillful
4/28/2009 7:14am,
Even if it is possible to be healthy while vegan, it certainly isn't easy or pleasant. The suggestion that humans are born incorrectly and you know better than natural selection about what the species should eat is just plain offensive.

Up until 500 years ago, 3/4 of the earth's inhabited landmass was populated by hunter-gathering people. I'd love to see any mention of any group that survived even 25 generations as vegans. Every anthropologist I've ever read on the subject has outright denied that such evidence exists. I would posit that it's very likely that no such people have ever existed. And despite earlier claims in this thread, vegetarianism is nowhere near universal among the Sikh people.

Here's some interesting reading (with links to further interesting reading) on fat as an energy source:
http://high-fat-nutrition.blogspot.com/search/label/Fat%20storage%20and%20retrieval

adouglasmhor
4/28/2009 8:23am,
I said mostly veggie, not vegan, I know how much Sikh food is dairy based, also a Khalsa Sikh can eat just about anything except beef, and the mostly was important too. Now stop being an illiterate twat.

Edited to add my GF has been Vegan and healthy for 25 years and it's no problem in a Western Society if you earn enough to buy the good stuff.

TxSanshou
4/28/2009 8:47am,
I agree its very likely that the transition from junk food to a better managed diet could have something to do with it. I'll see if I can find this article I've read about the vegan diet. In short it showed that statistically vegans have the lowest rates of heart disease which I thought was interesting. Also as for the protein, calcium , and iron deficiencies go I have hear about vegans having Iron deficiencies although I've never had a problem with it I get my iron from non-heme sources like asparagus, pumpkin seeds which are also good for prostate health and occasionally I'll take some black strap molasses for a supplement. For protein I eat a lot of legumes mixed with a grain like rice which creates a complete protein and for calcium I drink an enriched rice milk instead of soy milk which has to much estrogen.

TxSanshou
4/28/2009 8:49am,
It is easy to find lots of people who have wonderful success being vegan athletes.



yep look at Mac Danzig

socratic
4/28/2009 8:56am,
Being vegetarian/vegan is one of those things that you have to work really hard at just to take up the slack of cutting out the best thing that ever happened to humanity's ancestors [eating meat, which just happens to be incredibly high in energy] so it's not anything I'd recommend to anyone who doesn't have a significant amount of time or understanding to devote to it. 99.9999% of vegetarians my age [20 or below] are simply aenemic or incredibly dependant on supplements. The amount and diversity of food you'd have to eat if you weren't chewing pills like crazy would be staggering. The omegas, calcium, protein, saturated fat [which an increasing amount of literature is suggesting isn't anywhere near as harmful as originally suggested], etc etc.

There's a very good reason why the vast majority of successful athletes are omnivores. I challenge you to find me a significant number of olympic weightlifting gold medalists who are vegan.

Plus meat, eggs and milk just taste fucking great. You poor saps are really missing out.

sochin101
4/28/2009 10:27am,
Long-time veggie, never been vegan...
With supplements (I've even found vegan creatine) being as effective as they are, I can't see any vegan with a clue needing to have any deficiencies.
Sure, it would take some work to understand what you were missing out on from not eating a varied diet and then sourcing the right supplements (making sure your calcium tablet isn't made from ground up kittens etc), but it should be pretty straight forwards.

ArrogantBastard
4/28/2009 10:48am,
It is almost always more healthy to get vitamins/minerals from actual food versus supplements (for example, the flavanoid/antioxidants).

Meat provides (among other nutrients) iron, b12, and all essential amino acids, which vegetarians (and especially vegans) often lack in their diet and usually must rely on supplements.

If you go vegetarian, I'd recommend that you still consume dairy products as this will make things much easier.

A well-rounded vegetarian diet will probably put you on a similar level of a well-rounded omnivore diet either way.

The biggest gripe I have with vegetarians is that it's more of a political/activist statement rather than a dietary concern for many of them (or at least the ones who actively inform others that they are vegetarian).

JohnnyCache
4/28/2009 10:54am,
I can't believe you guys eat commercial plants. Aren't you worried about all the animals killed or displaced by agriculture?