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ignatzami
2/25/2009 11:45am,
This article was run in my local paper.

http://www.democratandchronicle.com/article/20090225/LIVING/902250315/1032?GID=CWCf4HJRcuUvhqRSUFIYdIUEUmtiR7bALeRowZ5Dt Hs%3D

I love the idea that BJJ somehow originated in India.

BaronVonDingDong
2/25/2009 11:51am,
Yeah, that is a bit stupid, though overall, the article is uniformly positive. I bet inquiries at that guy's school will go through the roof. Hell, I'd like to join.

Diesel_tke
2/25/2009 11:57am,
I see you set them strait at the bottom. I wonder what the writer was getting at. I mean, if he was going to try to obscurely trace the origins of martial arts and try to map them around, I would think he would end up in Greece. Going back to pancration. But I don't think that would be appropriate to the article. That's a whole different subject and not relative to the audience.

He should have just said that Brazilian Jiu-jitsu was developed in Brazil. But hey, he's the writer, not me.

1point2
2/25/2009 11:57am,
February 25, 2009

Rochester-area schools teach a form that emphasizes leverage over strength

Allison Roberts

Brazilian jiu-jitsu is best described by what it's not. It's not mixed martial arts. No punching, kicking or gouging. You won't learn how to pulverize someone with a lethal kick or how to split a two-by-four with your hand. So what is it, exactly?

At Saunders Brazilian jiu-jitsu in East Rochester, devotees grapple on mats, combining judo throws, aikido wrist locks, sambo leg locks a variety of moves and techniques based on the idea that a smaller person can use leverage to overcome a stronger assailant. One longtime student a 142-pounder can handle opponents twice his size, using moves that have become second nature through repetition.

Because Brazilian jiu-jitsu emphasizes ground fighting and leverage over strength, it makes an ideal form of self-defense. Women are increasingly studying BJJ nationally, and, gradually, in our area.

Tanya Taylor, a plant pathologist from East Rochester, started training five years ago. "My brother teaches BJJ in Florida, and he made me come to a class. It was really fun. I've been into it ever since."

And she has enjoyed the benefits. "When I first started, I could hardly sleep I was so sore. I had muscles hurting in places I honestly didn't know I had. But after I got used to it, I noticed a lot more definition, and I felt stronger overall."

Jiu-jitsu can be traced back centuries to India, where Buddhist monks created self-defense techniques based on balance, not strength. The practice eventually spread around the globe, including to Brazil. In the 1920s, brothers Carlos and Helio Gracie not known for their size adapted the martial art to include more leverage techniques that suited their smaller stature. Brazilian jiu-jitsu was born.

Kyle Saunders started his school after moving to Rochester from Texas, seeing it as a way to continue his own training. Another center, Peloton Martial Arts Center in Spencerport, offers classes for adults and children.

Because technique is so important in BJJ, it's not a sport that can be learned overnight.

"There are no freebies in BJJ you have to put in the time," says Saunders, a software engineer and BJJ black belt, who took about 10 years to gain his status.

Even seasoned martial arts practitioners see the practical advantages of BJJ.

"I started out at 15 years old doing tae kwon do, which I received a black belt in," says Marc Yates, a pharmaceutical sales rep from Rochester. "I went on to study tang soo do, jeet kune do, boxing and kick boxing. I have studied BJJ for approximately four years now, and I have never found an art that is more applicable to real self-defense situations than BJJ. Plus, my girlfriend likes the shape it keeps me in."

Jason Plaisted, a software developer from Henrietta, dropped more than 50 pounds through BJJ. "Since doing BJJ, my blood pressure has gone down, and I no longer need the blood pressure medication I used to take."

The warmup sessions alone are a workout. In one exercise, students wrap their legs around another person's waist while pulling themselves up into continuous sit-ups.

Another drill involves carrying someone on your back and running laps around the mats. These "warmups" build core muscles and stamina.

"I have three kids and since doing BJJ, I have more energy than I used to," says Kevin Wu, a mason from Henrietta. "And it has also helped me get through a work day with more energy."

Originally Wu joined for the exercise, but he now appreciates much more. "I love the fact that BJJ is like a physical chess game, where you have to figure out what your opponent might do next. I'm totally addicted now."

Peter Wagner, a student at McQuaid Jesuit High School, came into Saunders BJJ as a wrestler. "I kept trying to power into people it didn't work. In BJJ, technique is more important than sheer strength or weight. I really like that about it."

Allison Roberts is a freelance writer.
Additional Facts
Gyms

Some centers that offer Brazilian jiu-jitsu in the Rochester area:
# Saunders Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu in East Rochester, (585) 315-7647, saundersbjj.com.
# Bedroc Martial Arts Academy in Greece, (585) 755-5204, www.bedrocjudo.com.
# Empire Academy of Combat Sports & Fitness, (585) 943-1652, teamempire.us.
# Peloton Martial Arts Center, Spencerport, (585) 349-9265, www.pelotonbjj.com.

The India reference is making allusion to the mythological origin of Asian martial arts that became kung fu then karate. Boddhidarma and his breathing exercises, so the monks didn't become fatasses.

A better mythological origin for BJJ would be the Tengu, the winged and beclawed demons who taught the Japanese founder of jiujitsu (which century?).

Beorn
2/25/2009 12:02pm,
This article was run in my local paper.

http://www.democratandchronicle.com/article/20090225/LIVING/902250315/1032?GID=CWCf4HJRcuUvhqRSUFIYdIUEUmtiR7bALeRowZ5Dt Hs%3D

I love the idea that BJJ somehow originated in India.


Jiu-jitsu can be traced back centuries to India, where Buddhist monks created self-defense techniques based on balance, not strength.

lol. somehow it all traces back to kung fu

also:


Even seasoned martial arts practitioners see the practical advantages of BJJ.

"I started out at 15 years old doing tae kwon do, which I received a black belt in," says Marc Yates, a pharmaceutical sales rep from Rochester. "I went on to study tang soo do, jeet kune do, boxing and kick boxing. I have studied BJJ for approximately four years now, and I have never found an art that is more applicable to real self-defense situations than BJJ. Plus, my girlfriend likes the shape it keeps me in."

TKD blackbelts are serious seasoned martial artists, I TOLD YOU FUCKERS TO FEAR ME

:icon_roll

cuatro76
2/25/2009 12:03pm,
I love the idea that BJJ somehow originated in India.

It's all hidden in the super-secret Yoga bunkai.

ignatzami
2/25/2009 12:05pm,
It's like I said in the comments, not that it will matter, I appreciate the positive press but seriously, that one line just made my brain hurt!

sempaiman
2/25/2009 1:07pm,
Article said Jiu Jitsu started in India not BJJ...probably meant the Greeks and Pankration which evolved to Jiu Jitsu in their mind.

Mtripp
2/25/2009 1:26pm,
For many many years, the India reference has been found in various non-martial art sources. Likely it came from a quick check of a Dictionary or an Encylopedia.

However, where ever jujutsu came from is not the issue. GJJ/BJJ came from Judo, not "jiu-jitsu."

JohnnyFive
2/25/2009 1:27pm,
A better mythological origin for BJJ would be the Tengu, the winged and beclawed demons who taught the Japanese founder of jiujitsu (which century?).

While Jigoro Kano, the inventor of Judo (and hence BJJ), was indeed a fearsome martial artist, there is little truth to the rumors that he had actual wings and claws.


Judo judo judo.

Judo.

TEA
2/25/2009 1:44pm,
I thought all martial arts originated in Korea in 6000BC. Maybe the author got confused about the part where wandering Korean monks taught meditation techniques to Sakyamuni, which led to his achieving enlightenment. Or the Korean warriors who served as mercenaries in Alexander's army and taught them pancration. Or the wandering Korean warrior monks who traveled to Britain and gave Excalibur to Arthur, along with the secrets of what was to become Celtic-do. :blob1:

IT'S ALL KOREA!!!!

v1y
2/25/2009 1:48pm,
The article portrays BJJ in a positive light but is otherwise total nonsense.

Mtripp
2/25/2009 1:55pm,
I thought all martial arts originated in Korea in 6000BC. Maybe the author got confused about the part where wandering Korean monks taught meditation techniques to Sakyamuni, which led to his achieving enlightenment. Or the Korean warriors who served as mercenaries in Alexander's army and taught them pancration. Or the wandering Korean warrior monks who traveled to Britain and gave Excalibur to Arthur, along with the secrets of what was to become Celtic-do. :blob1:

IT'S ALL KOREA!!!!

Actually Chuin, Master of Sinanju has written this all down in Ung Poetry.

ignatzami
2/25/2009 2:02pm,
I wish Judo could get some good press, we have international level Kata and Shia competitors in Roc and we get nothing.... bothersome.

kwan_dao
2/25/2009 2:18pm,
However, where ever jujutsu came from is not the issue. GJJ/BJJ came from Judo, not "jiu-jitsu."

Erm... Judo is a Jiu Jitsu Ryu. In the early days of its founding it ran under a pletora of different names, including "Kano-Ryu", "Kodokan-Ryu" and simply "Jiu-Jitsu".

Which also explains why the Brazilians named their art Brazilian Jiu Jitsu. They learned from Judoka's who were still used to call their Judo "Jiu Jitsu".

Snake Plissken
2/25/2009 2:20pm,
I love the idea that BJJ somehow originated in India.

It was a typo.

They meant "Egypt"