PDA

View Full Version : Practicing Alone



wasd
12/16/2008 12:29am,
Hello everyone. :D

I'm quite a noob, and I really appreciate this forum and its cause to filter bullshit from the martial art community. Too may fraudsters. True true.

Anyway, I've trained previously in Kyokushin Kaikan... but am not able to train in the local dojo since my current line of work doesn't let me off until late at night... so I mostly practice alone in the mornings around 6 am or so before I go to work. Therefore, I'm more concerned on real-world self-defense rather than competitive fighting. I live in Sri Lanka, and it can get real messy sometimes on the streets.

After reading most of the online material available on martial arts I realized that practicing a purely striking art may not work in all real-world combat situations. Kyokushin has helped me a lot during the few fights I've been in, but this was because my opponents were inexperienced and there was never more than two or three of them. I want to learn more about grappling and joint-locks, but there are no proper schools here AFAIK, and most of the so-called "martial arts" schools are bogus.

How would you recommend me to learn and practice the latter form of combat? Right now, Youtube is the only option for me (which is quite lame I agree).

Thanks in advance!

OmegaBot
12/16/2008 12:30am,
Welcome aboard, wasd! The Bullshido staff would welcome you personally, but the thing is they’re busy keeping the peace, so they’ve apointed me, a bot, to pat you on the back and assure you that in no way will you be harmed during your stay here at BS.net. Your views on the martial arts, your philosphy, maybe even your entire reason for being will be challenged, shattered, reorganized, melted down, and forged into something new and shiny, but we swear it will only hurt a little bit… at first.

hoodedmonk
12/16/2008 12:35am,
Hello everyone. :D

I'm quite a noob, and I really appreciate this forum and its cause to filter bullshit from the martial art community. Too may fraudsters. True true.

Anyway, I've trained previously in Kyokushin Kaikan... but am not able to train in the local dojo since my current line of work doesn't let me off until late at night... so I mostly practice alone in the mornings around 6 am or so before I go to work. Therefore, I'm more concerned on real-world self-defense rather than competitive fighting. I live in Sri Lanka, and it can get real messy sometimes on the streets.

After reading most of the online material available on martial arts I realized that practicing a purely striking art may not work in all real-world combat situations. Kyokushin has helped me a lot during the few fights I've been in, but this was because my opponents were inexperienced and there was never more than two or three of them. I want to learn more about grappling and joint-locks, but there are no proper schools here AFAIK, and most of the so-called "martial arts" schools are bogus.

How would you recommend me to learn and practice the latter form of combat? Right now, Youtube is the only option for me (which is quite lame I agree).

Thanks in advance!If your ma. lets you handle two or three attackers at a time stick with it.

v1y
12/16/2008 10:16am,
if there's absolutely no schools around your best bet is to get some tapes and drill with a friend who's interested as well (and roll with him). not optimal, but it should do.

KaosRebel666
12/16/2008 3:14pm,
I would agree with both the previous posts. When I was unable to continue with Karate, I would still spar with my brother (who also was in Karate) and our friends.

We started learning wrestling moves when a friend, an ex-Marine, showed us a lot of different moves. This helped a great deal in one-on-one street fight. If there were more than two, I would use my running skills and get the hell out of there.

acidcrakker
12/16/2008 7:46pm,
I have a simialar issue. What I did was very simple, once or twice a month I would go to an instructor. I train daily but have a very rigourous work schedual.

Needless to say its okay to train alone as long as you can have someone to check your technique.

If you still cant do that, I suggest strength training. Pure bute force can still kick ass!

Rask
12/16/2008 10:35pm,
Buy a heavy striking bag - a long one so you can practice everything from punches to low kicks. Use it to condition your shins and knucles, and practice combining power with proper technique/form in your strikes. This will help you develop decent striking ability, but wont teach you the necessary timing, distance, adrenaline control, reactions etc that sparring does.

Buy a double-ended striking ball (the kind that is attached to the roof and the floor, with the ball in the middle) to train accuracy and responses. When you hit this ball, the elasticity of the ropes above and below it will cause it to bounce right back at you, and therefore you can practice dodging and/or blocking after you land an accurate, powerful punch.

If possible, find a friend who is interested in martial arts and get them to spar with you.

And, as acidcrakker said, strength training is also good... lift weight and build muscle. That'll help you a lot as well ;)

gun addict
12/16/2008 10:55pm,
buy a lift set too, no point on just doing Kata and punching bags if you're not going to pump some iron

oh, and don't push yourself too hard on the weight sets since no one is there to spot you

CoffeeFan
12/16/2008 11:20pm,
Yea, probably getting your hands on you tube, DVD's, and books and practicing with a friend.

Of course not NEARLY as good as having qualified instruction, but I say it's better then nothing.

TheRuss
12/16/2008 11:52pm,
buy a lift set too, no point on just doing Kata and punching bags if you're not going to pump some iron

oh, and don't push yourself too hard on the weight sets since no one is there to spot you

You're on the right track, but unless he's got a lump sum of money and long-term ambitions, he's better off either getting a month-to-month membership at a local gym with a decent power rack and dumbbells, or doing some of the bodyweight stuff (see the PT forum for details).

Still, though, good thought. If you can't develop your skills, develop your attributes.