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El Pibe
12/15/2008 1:08pm,
Well, first of all I'm not a big guy at all. I'm 5'5 and fluctuate between 160-170. So lean muscle, but not bulky. It seems whenever I mount someone in BJJ, particularly when it's someone bigger than me, they easily roll me over and get in my guard. I grapevine and base my arms out, but it seems like any time I try to go for an attack they easily roll me over.

So is mount really a position you should stick to when the opponent is around your size and strength? Or are there little details I'm missing that makes it harder for them to roll me? I was told by a few people that if someone is significatly larger, it's better to stay in side control or maybe even knee on the belly.

Any tips?

SuperGuido
12/15/2008 1:11pm,
Prepare for JNP ownage!

Do a search for this topic, and you'll see this covered at length.

The bottom line, though, is this:

Train hard, ask your coach for tips, ask your training partner what you could do to improve your stability, and train hard.

Most importantly, TRAIN HARD.

Give it another few months and you'll ask yourself why you bothered to post this.

DKJr
12/15/2008 1:29pm,
Heavy hips, learn to swim in (when they push against you), listen to your coach, specifically ask him this question, remember lots of weight, no space, listen to JNP. Work tirelessly on mount, for a long time I had mount issues with big monsters, I asked, I worked, I submitted.

UpaLumpa
12/15/2008 4:14pm,
Based on how you phrased a few things, I'm willing to bet that you're treating mount as a static position. It isn't. "Mount" refers to a lot of positions which only really resemble each other because you're on top of all of them and they're in someway between your legs.

If you're getting upa'd as soon as you start to attack, your weight is too far back (your hips are over their hips). Move up to a high mount. Do they then start to shrimp? S-Mount. Transition back to grapevines. Repeat. You can't just grapevine, hold that, move to one other thing and hold that.

Oh and if you are getting reversed, don't be so dogged about keeping mount. Bail to side. Better to be in side than on your back.

MEGALEF
12/15/2008 7:08pm,
What Upa just said. Don't ge afraid to bail to side. Is he trying to get halfguard by working with elbow escape? Set up your grips for side and get off him.

Pay attention to which side of him your head is over, because that is the side you're currently putting your weight to. That's where he's most likely to bridge you over.

UpaLumpa
12/15/2008 7:41pm,
Pay attention to which side of him your head is over, because that is the side you're currently putting your weight to. That's where he's most likely to bridge you over.

Good point.
Mount or side you cannot be too cognizant of where your weight is.
From side, you're the plank on a teeter-totter and your opponent is the fulcrum. Which side does a teeter totter tip too? Which side is your weight on.

jnp
12/15/2008 9:55pm,
If you're a lightweight person, it's important to maintain a high mount if you want to hold onto the position. Your knees should be practically inside their arm pits. Equally critical and often overlooked, is the squeeze. Just like when you squeeze your knees to isolate a limb before a submission, squeeze them inward toward each other to increase control and help to stay in a high mount. Never stop squeezing. Also remember Megalef's point, about head position. Lastly, always stay as low as possible.

Sounds to me like you need to concentrate on the squeeze the most though.

Like Upa said, unless you're grappling a vegetable, you will have to continually adjust to hold onto the position. This means moving the knee back into the arm pit after they buck to escape. Also, have your coach or a senior student show you S-mount and how to transition between it and standard mount.

One thing my instructor taught me a long time ago to assist in learning how to hold onto a top position, instead of looking for subs, focus on holding it for a few minutes at a time before going for a finish. Move slowly, focusing on good weight distribution when you do go for the sub.

Cassius
12/15/2008 10:03pm,
I took the liberty of moving this out of DHS, by the way. I've been so bored today.

Omega Supreme
12/15/2008 10:13pm,
Wow, Upa actually gave out good advice for once.

jnp
12/15/2008 10:31pm,
I took the liberty of moving this out of DHS, by the way. I've been so bored today.
Ah, that would explain Satori's comment. I wondered about that.

It was your forum first. I'm just your placeholder.

Cassius
12/15/2008 11:30pm,
Dude, you're about to get your brown belt. Your street cred runs so much higher than mine. I don't even really get to train anymore. I will pretty much always defer to your judgement.

3moose1
12/16/2008 12:32am,
As a general rule, if the guy is more then 30 pounds heavier then me, i try to avoid mounting.

Omega Supreme
12/16/2008 2:21am,
As a general rule, if the guy is more then 30 pounds heavier then me, i try to avoid mounting.

That's a dumb rule.

Goju - Joe
12/16/2008 2:40am,
Yeah there are plenty of little guys who can make themselves seem to weigh 300 pounds.

I hates them

codo3500
12/16/2008 2:48am,
That's a dumb rule.
agreed, i've seen good whitebelts hold a solid mount on blokes twice their size with no trouble at all.

Omega Supreme
12/16/2008 3:11am,
So we all agree? 3Moose is Canadian.?