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NoDoze5280
12/13/2008 6:44am,
OK so I figure that I should go on and bite the bullet and get this over with. I've never really been good at intros, but I had to do it sooner or later. (That banner at the top was starting to bug me.)

A friend of mine actually pointed me here after he had found some info about a "MA" program we were researching. I would actually tell you what it was we were looking into, but in fear of a "perma-Noob" tag, I'm taking that one to the grave. All I have to say is thank you for having the info that we had been looking for and saving us a boat load of money.

Well as far as the basics. I'm from Denver, CO, born and raised. As far as any MA background I really don't have any. Unless you include the different things various members of my family that have had actual training have taught me since I was young. The majors would be from kickboxing to CQC stuff and Muai Thai. They pretty much gave me enough to never have to worry about losing a basic "back-alley" street fight, but I'm sure that against an actual trained fighter I would for sure be just a training dummy.

Now, I have always wanted to get some actual form of MA training, but I have the attention span of a goldfish so I could actually never choose anything to get started with. So thats kinda why I'm here, to so what is actually out there.

Any and ALL help is welcome

TKDBot
12/13/2008 6:45am,
Welcome to Bullshido, the best Martial Arts forum on the entire Internet, NoDoze5280. Seriously, you won't regret your choice to join us. We're a great bunch of folks, except for Hannibal. And Sirc. And TaiGip. And MMA Kid. And... well, you get the point.

HonkyTonkMan
12/13/2008 9:19am,
Well, welcome.

A few tips...

1) Dont screw with your font.
2) Whatever MA you choose, choose it for your own reasons. If you just wanna get a belt then choose the one that fits you. If you want to learn to defend yourself AND have fun, choose the one that fits you.
3) Cross training is the way to go.


List the goals you have for MA training and Bullshido can start from there.

Katje
12/13/2008 9:51am,
Hiya NoDoze

Having a read around the site, particularly in the different style forums should help you get an idea of what you might enjoy if you haven't done this already. Best idea is to do what Happy LOLidays says and give us an idea of what you want to get out of your training and if possible a shortlist of styles you've heard/read about and would like to try.

That's my annoying message gone too!

NoDoze5280
12/13/2008 6:37pm,
Thanks for the tips. My home PC does that font thing automatically for some reason. Just too lazy to actually figure out why. As far as what I'm looking to get out of training, fitness and discipline are the main points. I know that I want to start off with something more so traditional, then possible move on to MMA from there. The one style that I have been looking a lot into lately has been Kempo. I like how it incorporates strikes, take downs and joint locks. At least thats what I have seen of it anyway.

TheRuss
12/13/2008 6:50pm,
I know that I want to start off with something more so traditional, then possible move on to MMA from there.

Judo is traditional.

HonkyTonkMan
12/13/2008 7:31pm,
Thanks for the tips. My home PC does that font thing automatically for some reason. Just too lazy to actually figure out why. As far as what I'm looking to get out of training, fitness and discipline are the main points. I know that I want to start off with something more so traditional, then possible move on to MMA from there. The one style that I have been looking a lot into lately has been Kempo. I like how it incorporates strikes, take downs and joint locks. At least thats what I have seen of it anyway.


So you want a belt rank?

If so, then Judo is definitely a good start. For striking...a belt art? Kyokushin Karate has a fairly good contact/sparring ratio.

Unless you just want the belt ranks there is no reason not to start MMA. MMA doesnt mean that you will be or even want to be a MMA fighter. It covers all the basics of a SD scenario. The training is usually good, and it requires you to be in some modicum of physical shape.

NoDoze5280
12/14/2008 9:03pm,
Yeah, belt ranks really don't hold my attention really. At least not at this point anyway. I've started looking into various schools here in Denver, but in all honesty I don't really know what I should be looking for to figure out if the school is any good. I've tried looking at different school locater web sites and they never seem to find anything in the Denver Metro area. Any suggestions on ways to determine whether or not a school is any good?

P.S. Two schools that stood out locally were
http://www.agogewarrior.com/ - due to the varity offered and the location

http://www.highaltitudema.com - Because I recognized the name Nate Marquardt.

TheRuss
12/14/2008 9:13pm,
P.S. Two schools that stood out locally were
http://www.agogewarrior.com/ - due to the varity offered and the location

http://www.highaltitudema.com - Because I recognized the name Nate Marquardt.

I'd go with the second one, personally. Here's a quote from one of the instructors' profiles from the first place:


n Addition, He is a master of arms in the Society for Creative Anachronism holding the rank & title of "Knight SCA".

:psyduck:

Matt Phillips
12/14/2008 9:19pm,
In addition, He is a master of arms in the Society for Creative Anachronism holding the rank & title of "Knight SCA"
Lol. Jine the Millitia.

PointyShinyBurn
12/14/2008 9:20pm,
http://www.highaltitudema.com - Because I recognized the name Nate Marquardt.
You should really train here if it's at all possible. Marquadt is easily top-ten in the world at 185 and all the instructors seem to be serious fighters.

A bunch of nondescript JKD-concepts guys who like to play with Renaissance fair weapons isn't really going to compare, quite frankly.

NoDoze5280
12/14/2008 9:21pm,
lol I actually hadn't looked into the profiles on that site yet. Shows that I have no clue what I'm doing.

Sophist
12/14/2008 9:40pm,
Any suggestions on ways to determine whether or not a school is any good?
Well, a lot of it is about choreography.

When you're first learning to do something, it makes sense to go through it slowly in a situation which is perhaps a little abstracted from the way you'll have to use it. Think of learning to drive seated on the sofa with a dinner plate, putting your hands in the ten to two position. Everyone includes this step in their teaching. It can still be useful training later on. Tennis players practice their swing, footballers their kicks.

Where many schools fail, however, is in moving on from there. They keep on choreographing, perhaps focusing on different techniques each week, but never advancing past that most basic level. A good step is to mix it up, to incorporate other elements; this helps keep the drill from growing stale. Boxers, for instance, punch pads as a part of their training, and sometimes the pad holder will swing the pad at their head so they can train slipping punches - it makes the drill a little closer to a real fight.

Most important of all is that the techniques are tested in an environment which provides a feedback loop. You can't learn to drive without a car, learn to swim without water, even learn chess without an opponent to play against. Similarly, you can't learn to fight without facing someone who's fighting back, someone who wants to win as badly as you do.

The quality of the feedback loop is decided by the ruleset you are fighting under. Some feedback loops are very poor - striking training that stops after the first hit may breed more bad habits than instill good ones. However, continuous hard contact sparring generally breeds beneficial skills. MMA is particularly good because the range of responses that an opponent can make to your techniques is so broad that it much more closely resembles a real fight than most other forms of training.

Schools that compete in continuous full contact rulesets generally produce better fighters than schools that do not. Some styles have higher proportions of these schools than others; in particular, people here will recommend boxing, muay thai, Brazilian jujitsu, judo and wrestling. These are not the only good styles, but they are the most commonly available of the well-regarded styles.

Also, be aware that an art that does not do a good job of pressure testing its stuff is likely over time to accumulate techniques that have never been properly tested against anyone. Such an art may have a teacher who is patient, experienced and good at explaining things, may be taught in a calm and respectful environment and may look very impressive when employed on the teacher's students - and still be utterly worthless. The feedback loop is key.

NoDoze5280
12/14/2008 11:44pm,
Well this for sure makes things easier for me. Thanks. Now all I have to do is get a better schedule at work and I'll be set. this swing shift just ain't gonna work anymore.

jnp
12/14/2008 11:58pm,
The quality of the feedback loop is decided by the ruleset you are fighting under. Some feedback loops are very poor - striking training that stops after the first hit may breed more bad habits than instill good ones. However, continuous hard contact sparring generally breeds beneficial skills. MMA is particularly good because the range of responses that an opponent can make to your techniques is so broad that it much more closely resembles a real fight than most other forms of training
Sigged.

NoDoze5280
12/16/2008 6:38am,
OK, so after a few days of browsing the forums and threads, a few questions have surfaced. First, what is it with the hostility towards MAs like Akido, hapkido, Karate, Kung Fu, TKD and the such? Is it because most dojos out there aren't worth anything? Or is a, "ROFL, that can't work in an actual fight!" mentality? maybe something else completely.

I mean, correct me if I'm wrong, but isn't it true that MA isn't all about fighting and the such? Can't it just be about the Art itself? Granted I haven't even begun to scratch the surface of everything out there, (been mainly using the search feature to find stuff that I was looking into). So i could quite possible be missing out on the places that actually explain the hostility.

Now don't get me wrong, albeit abrassive I have still been able to, for the most part, get the info that I was looking for. I pretty much am asking the above questions to satisfy my own curiosity, just so I know how much gear I need to adorn when I venture out of the kiddie pool into the deep end.

P.S. What is it with Judo that makes it so great? That style seems to pop up everywhere somehow. (i know that wouldn't be something I'd be into mainly cause I actually like punching people. Figure i'd nip that in the but before I got the "Judo, Judo, Judo" bum rush)

P.P.S. Since I live here in Denver I found that whole SWAN forum very amusing. Kinda makes me want to start my own Ninja camp now. Maybe then I could afford college and not be broke all the damn time.