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View Full Version : How many people on Bullshido Train Hapkido



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svt2026
10/27/2008 11:38pm,
Just Calling out for a count of how many people on this forum train in hapkido. I want to know because of the lack of usefull discussion in the korean martial art forum about it.

Actually in my eyes there is a lack of any usefull style discussion.

No one ever shares training methods, techniques, linages they are with.

DerAuslander
10/28/2008 12:05am,
1) Quit your bitching.
2) Quit starting stupid threads.
3) Start contibuting.

DngrRuss1
10/28/2008 12:22am,
C'mon, without bitching and stupid threads, this wouldn't be Bullshido :pottytrai

gooking
10/28/2008 1:27am,
In my personal opinion cross-training in boxing or at least incorporating boxing training methodologies would help complement Hapkido.

Hapkido, generally, does have a lot of low-percentage moves that involves grabbing the opponent's arm(s) in mid-air. Most people don't have the reflexes to pull off those types of techniques. A good boxer, on the other hand, can avoid punches fairly well and so hypothetically has a better chance in catching an opponent's arm either off-guard or while he tries to throw a punch.

Upper-body strength is also important. Some hapkido techniques are practical, most won't work on their own. So you need that extra strength in case the technique itself isn't enough.

Rene "Zendokan" Gysenbergs
10/28/2008 4:10am,
Sorry to pick your post apart, but...



In my personal opinion cross-training in boxing or at least incorporating boxing training methodologies would help complement Hapkido.


Whilest crosstraining is good, it's not it that's going to improof your base art.
It is the trainingmethode that's going to improve the MA.



Hapkido, generally, does have a lot of low-percentage moves that involves grabbing the opponent's arm(s) in mid-air. Most people don't have the reflexes to pull off those types of techniques. A good boxer, on the other hand, can avoid punches fairly well and so hypothetically has a better chance in catching an opponent's arm either off-guard or while he tries to throw a punch.

Upper-body strength is also important. Some hapkido techniques are practical, most won't work on their own. So you need that extra strength in case the technique itself isn't enough.


Alot of Hapkido styles have "low-percentage moves" because the techniques are still trained in "grab my wrist" routines and with compliant partners.
If you train these techniques against a resistant partner in "semi-contact" and "hard-contact" you'll find out that the techniques get adapted to work (without using excessive strenght). And it's this level that needs to be obtained.

Now the appearence of Hapkido changes in a persons lifetime because of aging and skill-level.

When you're young and/or your not that much experienced in Hapkido, you're fightingstyle resembles "Hapki Kickboxing"
When you hit your thirties and got about 6 to 7 years of Hapkido training, you're fightingstyle looks like Hapkido should be ( a nice mixture of hard and soft techniques).
And when you are 55+ or 65+ (depending on fitnesslevel) you're fightingstyle resembles "Hapki Yusul".

So the most important is not the style of Hapkido, it's the trainingsmethode. The rest will be sorted out by time.

svt2026
10/28/2008 7:34am,
When you're young and/or your not that much experienced in Hapkido, you're fightingstyle resembles "Hapki Kickboxing"
When you hit your thirties and got about 6 to 7 years of Hapkido training, you're fightingstyle looks like Hapkido should be ( a nice mixture of hard and soft techniques).
And when you are 55+ or 65+ (depending on fitnesslevel) you're fightingstyle resembles "Hapki Yusul".

So the most important is not the style of Hapkido, it's the trainingsmethode. The rest will be sorted out by time.

Your totally right in your statement. It's exactly how my way of training and thinking has changed through out the years.

As far as boxing it is definetly great tool to add. My teacher always had us practice some boxing skills. It wasn't much as boxing goes but still good practice. I dont think hapkido techniques against a punch were meant to work agains a boxer. They will work agains someone of less skill who doesnt pull back their arm imedietly.

BudoMonkey
10/28/2008 7:45am,
76.

2 of them succesfully.

retrograde
10/28/2008 7:51am,
I did hapkido for a few months ages ago. I think I was hoping for judo with kicks. Instead, I got aikido with Korean language lessons.

svt2026
10/28/2008 7:52am,
76.

2 of them succesfully.

Im assuming this means out of 76 techniques 2 are successfull.

BudoMonkey
10/28/2008 7:54am,
76 people who train hapkido. 2 of them are succesfull in applying the skills they have learned in combat against other arts.

Really, I'm just talking out of my ass.

So listen, why don't you provide the sort of discussion you were so critical of us for omitting? Discuss some techniques.

What is your lineage?

svt2026
10/28/2008 8:01am,
76 people who train hapkido. 2 of them are succesfull in applying the skills they have learned in combat against other arts.

Really, I'm just talking out of my ass.

So listen, why don't you provide the sort of discussion you were so critical of us for omitting? Discuss some techniques.

What is your lineage?

First I was with the Korean Hapkido Federation. My teacher under that association studied Hapkido, Judo, Taekwondo, and some kickboxing.

Now I'm with the New Korean Hapkido Martial Arts Federation (I might have the full name wrong). It's led by my second teachers master.

BudoMonkey
10/28/2008 8:03am,
Ok, nice to meet ya. And can you fight?

What kind of competitions does your school enter?

( This isn't an attack in any way, just trying to gather some info. Don't know too much bout hapkido )

svt2026
10/28/2008 8:10am,
Ok, nice to meet ya. And can you fight?

What kind of competitions does your school enter?

( This isn't an attack in any way, just trying to gather some info. Don't know too much bout hapkido )

The only competition I ever went to was a few TKD tourneys for sparring and I suck at that. No we dont compete in other competitions. I am trying to change that.

Rene "Zendokan" Gysenbergs
10/28/2008 8:32am,
The only competition I ever went to was a few TKD tourneys for sparring and I suck at that. No we dont compete in other competitions. I am trying to change that.

I would suggest that you look for "sport ju jutsu" competitions since Hapkido is an offshoot of Daito Ryu Aiki Ju Jutsu (DRAJJ).
The JJJ opponents will maybe go a little harder on you in the fights, but I consider that a plus point.

Normally there aren't any problems in entering these types of tournaments so long you acknoledge the DRAJJ lineage and not the 2000 year old Hwa Rang fable.

svt2026
10/28/2008 9:48am,
I would suggest that you look for "sport ju jutsu" competitions since Hapkido is an offshoot of Daito Ryu Aiki Ju Jutsu (DRAJJ).
The JJJ opponents will maybe go a little harder on you in the fights, but I consider that a plus point.

Normally there aren't any problems in entering these types of tournaments so long you acknoledge the DRAJJ lineage and not the 2000 year old Hwa Rang fable.

I totaly agree with the linage. My first teacher was pro korean linage. But my last teacher is third generation practitioner and he was told that Young Sul Choi learned from a Japanees master. When he returned to Korea that is when he started to change HKD into his own style.

Never thought of looking for sport JJ tourneys, Thanks for that idea.

So I still want to find out who out on Bullshido trains in Hapkido.

DerAuslander
10/28/2008 9:58am,
Then start contributing.