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dkbaumbach
6/29/2008 3:40am,
Hello,

I've been registered here for a while, even posted a few times when I registered, but lately have been lurking more and more. For the last 4 or 5 years, I have wanted to get involved in a martial art, (yes I know that there are differences between martial arts and fighting arts).

I tried an Aikido school for a few weeks on their free trial system, but didn't like the philosophy, playful sparring, new age attitude. It felt, wimpy. They of course insisted that they could defend themselves, but do so with "love, respect, and harmony". I realized that we were not on the same page, and excused myself.

Thinking that perhaps I should try the other end of the spectrum, I went for a trial at Moore's Karate, "Where we can't spar at all, because there would be eyeballs and severed ears lying all over the mat from our horse stance strikes". I didn't like this either, and the pricing was outrageous.

I am by no means a meathead, repressed agressor, tough guy, angry man, hotshot, etc. But if I am paying someone money to learn to defend myself, I want to be confidant I could lay the hurt on someone. I can't seem to find a place that serves up solid, no nonsense, schooling with sparring. So far, I like the looks of Judo, BJJ, Muai Thai, or some kind of MMA training, but am not set on those styles and would consider others. Furthermore, I don't want to be broken by some 35 year old sexually repressed maniac trying to show me how to properly execute a flying armbar.

I live in Lodi, CA (yes make all the Creedance Clearwater references while you can). I have read all about the McDojo theory and it seems to be along the lines of my own thinking. Does anyone know of a good, safe, sparring, practical, reasonable priced place that isn't taught by a douche? I could travel anywhere between Stockton and Sacramento... It may be a shot in the dark, but if anyone can recommend a place, it would be greatly appreciated.

GhostOfKimura
6/29/2008 3:41am,
So dkbaumbach, you decided to go ahead and register huh? Cool. Don't forget to review your dojo (http://www.bullshido.net/forums/forumdisplay.php?f=83).

Just Guess
6/29/2008 3:58am,
Well if you ask me this looks promising.

http://www.cwo.com/~judo/sjc/

slideyfoot
6/29/2008 4:37am,
Welcome to Bullshido!


Hello,

I've been registered here for a while, even posted a few times when I registered, but lately have been lurking more and more. For the last 4 or 5 years, I have wanted to get involved in a martial art, (yes I know that there are differences between martial arts and fighting arts).
First of all, I'd recommend you take a look at the FAQ (http://www.bullshido.com/articles/finding-a-good-martial-arts-school.html) on finding a good martial arts school. In general, signs to look for are a competitive record, regular heavy contact sparring and 'aliveness' (if you're unfamiliar with the term, Matt Thornton has a long article (http://aliveness101.blogspot.com/2005/07/why-aliveness.html) on the topic describing what it is and why it's important: he is the man most associated with popularising the concept).

If your interest is mainly in striking, the safest option if you want decent training is muay thai (which you'll also see as 'thai boxing'), along with martial arts like boxing and kyokushin karate. That's not to say there aren't good schools within other striking styles, but they tend to vary widely in quality.

If you're more interested in grappling, then BJJ would be an excellent choice, as the strong competitive element and ability-based ranking system generally results in high quality training. A cheaper option is judo, which is also much easier to find - the two styles are closely related, the main difference being that judo normally focuses on throws whereas BJJ is mostly about the ground. For more on judo, read the Bullshido.com article (http://www.bullshido.com/articles/judo-6.html) - there is also an article on BJJ (http://www.bullshido.com/articles/brazilian-jiu-jitsu-style-information-without-the-bs-2.html). SAMBO is another good choice, but even harder to find than BJJ. Then there's wrestling, which is also great training for grappling.

Alternately, you could combine grappling and striking by cross-training in several arts, or at an MMA gym (though technically 'MMA' is a ruleset rather than a specific style). Examples of well known MMA gyms would be Team Quest (http://www.tqfc.com/) and Miletich Fighting Systems (http://miletichnewyork.com/).

Finally, you could try having a look through the dojo reviews (http://www.bullshido.net/forums/forumdisplay.php?f=83) section, which might yield something more specific to your area. Alternately, you could try a Google site search, either off the Google toolbar, or by typing "site:www.bullshido.net" followed by the area.

There are also several school databases you could try. For example, for BJJ:

TrainJiuJitsu.com (http://www.trainjiujitsu.com/bjj/)
bjjMap.com (http://www.bjjmap.com/)
Gym Database (http://www.gymdb.com/) (BJJ, MMA etc)


So far, I like the looks of Judo, BJJ, Muai Thai, or some kind of MMA training, but am not set on those styles and would consider others. Furthermore, I don't want to be broken by some 35 year old sexually repressed maniac trying to show me how to properly execute a flying armbar.

Heh - that shouldn't be a problem. The people you need to worry about are the over-enthusiastic white belts who treat every spar as life or death. Normally easy enough to work out who those people are through observation, but generally if you're concerned about injury, the simply answer is to relax, tap early and tap often. Most of the injuries I've seen in my admittedly brief training so far (started Nov 06) have been due to misplaced pride, leading people to refuse to tap and thereby mess up a limb.


I live in Lodi, CA (yes make all the Creedance Clearwater references while you can). I have read all about the McDojo theory and it seems to be along the lines of my own thinking.
Erm...you're in California, so aren't you the fortunate son? Something like that. Anyway, California has a lot of great BJJ (if thats the option you end up plumping for), so loads of choice. For example, in San Diego, there's all this (http://thefightworkspodcast.com/2008/02/19/san-diego-bjj/).

dkbaumbach
7/02/2008 2:05pm,
Thanks a lot slideyfoot! And Just Guess, thanks for the recommendation, I've done some looking on online yellow pages for schools and never stumbled on that one. If I do go with Judo, how do I avoid the "competition" set of bad habits that people talk about around here. I know I'm probably not articulating this properly, but things like stopping after a "point" is scored and that type of thing. Or is Judo sparring different from TKD sparring in that regard?

slideyfoot
7/02/2008 5:01pm,
If I do go with Judo, how do I avoid the "competition" set of bad habits that people talk about around here. I know I'm probably not articulating this properly, but things like stopping after a "point" is scored and that type of thing. Or is Judo sparring different from TKD sparring in that regard?

I'm not a judoka, but I think I can be fairly confident in saying that judo randori is nothing like TKD sparring. As in BJJ, muay thai, boxing, wrestling and other well-regarded styles on this site, judo provides an environment in which you can test your technique against a fully resisting opponent through sparring. That should help avoid the pitfalls of developing bad habits, as you'll be working with an opponent trying their best to prevent you from successfully applying your technique upon them.

However, best if a judoka answers your question: should hopefully be one of them on the thread shortly. :icon_wink

dkbaumbach
7/02/2008 5:07pm,
Not to sound ignorant, but a judoka is one who practices judo?

slideyfoot
7/02/2008 5:28pm,
Not to sound ignorant, but a judoka is one who practices judo?

Yes.

You could also check out the the Japanese MA subforum (http://www.bullshido.net/forums/forumdisplay.php?f=103) for more judo discussion, as well as the excellent grappling subforum (http://www.bullshido.net/forums/forumdisplay.php?f=56) on here.

dkbaumbach
7/05/2008 12:56am,
Are there any Judo practitioners who can give there advice to someone considering their art?

dkbaumbach
7/10/2008 1:02pm,
Hate to keep brining this up, but still looking for Judo practitioners to give some info... any out there?

Judomofo
7/22/2008 10:41am,
Yeah, you got one here now... sorry I don't check this forum as often as I should.

There are some great schools in California, I would have to bust out the map and see what is near you. San Jose has some great Judo as well.


I think you are more likely to find laid back non meatheads in most Judo environments, I think you can find the same thing in a MMA school, or BJJ school, I think the vocal minority of douches ruin the overall opinion sometimes. Most MMA schools are filled with guys who are there to do their thing, learn, and have fun without having any ego involved.

Finding a good Judo place isn't hard, most of them are going to be good and it sounds like you aren't interested in a highly competetive club, so it isn't as though you need some big name school, you just need a place where you can click with the people there.


As far as bad habits go, that really depends on the individual and how you train... you won't have any instructor chastise you for finishing a throw in a dominant position. Most of the time, any GOOD competetive club is going to focus on that aspect anyway...


Throwing and never going to the mat is an example of a bad competetive player, and a bad habit, competeting a high level you always land in a pin, a dominant position, or in place to apply a submission. It is the small time local and regional guys that get used to just throwing and never going to the mat, some of them do this as a means of conserving energy, but at an upper level, lack of ground game can cost you, as well as not finishing.

Honestly that is a habit most instructors will try to teach, and you should do yourself, usually guys who don't go to the ground in a high level, or usually the ones that aren't confident of their ground game, and I would tather play it safe on points.

Most good schools are going to have you work on transitions and ensuring you finish your throws.

What other questions do you have?

hungryjoe
7/22/2008 10:49am,
Hate to keep brining this up, but still looking for Judo practitioners to give some info... any out there?

Go check out judo.

You'll meet a great group of people. The randori is live and it's a great way to stay in shape. The cost is usually very reasonable.

If you want to expand your game later to striking you can check out other arts.

Judo is everywhere for a reason.