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hero2u
4/05/2008 1:17pm,
Hello everyone.
Im interested in some opinions on a self defense style of martial art. I'm looking for a style that teaches real self defense without years of training and complex moves. I have discovered that hapkido seems to be the "foundation" of many WWII type of combat self defense styles. I have done research on combat hapkido but apparently a good school is much harder to find than I had expected. I have found countless schools that are really just tae kwon do schools. I've considered krav maga, kali too. I'm currently a 2nd brown in Kenpo but kenpo isn't so great for realistic self defense, its way too technical.

TKDBot
4/05/2008 1:18pm,
Welcome to the Bullshido Forums hero2u... Make sure you review your dojo (http://www.bullshido.net/forums/forumdisplay.php?f=83) and add it to your user control panel so you can get the http://www.bullshido.net/images/dojoreview1.gif icon in your user info bar in your posts.

kultist
4/05/2008 2:17pm,
Hello everyone.
Im interested in some opinions on a self defense style of martial art. I'm looking for a style that teaches real self defense without years of training and complex moves. I have discovered that hapkido seems to be the "foundation" of many WWII type of combat self defense styles. I have done research on combat hapkido but apparently a good school is much harder to find than I had expected. I have found countless schools that are really just tae kwon do schools. I've considered krav maga, kali too. I'm currently a 2nd brown in Kenpo but kenpo isn't so great for realistic self defense, its way too technical.

No, japanese jujutsu and judo were the foundation for most of those manuals, and hapkido was taken mainly from aikijutsu which the founder of the art studied.

Hapkido has very little quality control. It can be brilliant (like MMA in a gi with a few self defence techniques) or it can be **** (think lots and lots and lots and lots of standing wristlocks)

2003volusia
4/05/2008 2:24pm,
I really think that what you get out of your training has a direct correlation to what you put into it. Kempo may be technical, but it's real world application does not have to use all the fancy things. I am in Taekwondo and I practice all the flashy kicks and moves that comes with it. I would never dream of using those in a real fight. I take time out of my day to practice the more practical portions of the art. A properly delivered punch or kick can really ruin someones day.

So what I am saying is that examine what you have learned and see if there are some simple basic moves that you can use in a real fight. The Karate Kid would have gotten shot doing all that stuff on the street.

wikidbounce
4/07/2008 12:44am,
From what I know hapkido has a lot of great techniques. however it wouldn't be what your after from what you have asked. the large number of techniques would take years to master.

slideyfoot
4/07/2008 6:48am,
Welcome to Bullshido!


Im interested in some opinions on a self defense style of martial art. I'm looking for a style that teaches real self defense without years of training and complex moves.

First of all, I'd recommend you take a look at the FAQ (http://www.bullshido.com/articles/finding-a-good-martial-arts-school.html) on finding a good martial arts school. In general, signs to look for are a competitive record, regular heavy contact sparring and 'aliveness' (if you're unfamiliar with the term, Matt Thornton has a long article (http://aliveness101.blogspot.com/2005/07/why-aliveness.html) on the topic describing what it is and why it's important: he is the man most associated with popularising the concept).

If your interest is mainly in striking, the safest option if you want decent training is muay thai (which you'll also see as 'thai boxing'), along with martial arts like boxing and kyokushin karate. That's not to say there aren't good schools within other striking styles, but they tend to vary widely in quality.

If you're more interested in grappling, then BJJ would be an excellent choice, as the strong competitive element and ability-based ranking system generally results in high quality training. A cheaper option is judo, which is also much easier to find - the two styles are closely related, the main difference being that judo normally focuses on throws whereas BJJ is mostly about the ground. For more on judo, read the Bullshido.com article (http://www.bullshido.com/articles/judo-6.html) - there is also an article on BJJ (http://www.bullshido.com/articles/brazilian-jiu-jitsu-style-information-without-the-bs-2.html). SAMBO is another good choice, but even harder to find than BJJ. Then there's wrestling, which is also great training for grappling.

Alternately, you could combine grappling and striking by cross-training in several arts, or at an MMA gym (though technically 'MMA' is a ruleset rather than a specific style). Examples of well known MMA gyms would be Team Quest (http://www.tqfc.com/) and Miletich Fighting Systems (http://miletichnewyork.com/).

Finally, you could try having a look through the dojo reviews (http://www.bullshido.net/forums/forumdisplay.php?f=83) section, which might yield something more specific to your area.