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drummingman
3/14/2008 10:01pm,
so i have been looking into taking either wing chun or goju karate. the thing is that i have tendenitis in my wrists and my left knee is messed up from an old injury. so im trying to figure out which of these 2 styles would be the better fit for me.
when it comes to my knee if i jar it in any way it feels like someone is siticking a knife in it. i can walk ok with it, although walking up and down stairs can be painful, but walking for the most prat is fine. i have been doing physical therapy for it for about a month and it has gotten better, but not 100%. the doctor told me that if the therapy does not fix it he can do surgery and that would help it, but it could still come back after doing the surgery. so i dont want to do the surgery if i can help it.
when it comes to my wrists i have had surgery on my left wrist twice, about 10 years ago. but at times i still get pain in both of my arms and wrists.
i am also a professional drummer, thats what i do for a living, so i do have to watch what i do so i dont injure meself.
so, what all of this said which should i take wing chun or goju karate?

Beezer
3/14/2008 10:16pm,
I doubt with your injuries, that you can do either style. I am also a drummer, and I developed tendonitis in my elbow over a year ago. I just took a break, iced and used heat packs every day, and my tendonitis went away. It sounds like your injuries are more severe. If you DO NOT need a martial art for self-defense purposes, you should take up Tai chi. Tai chi will help your body to heal, and get you right. I have also done Wing Chun, and, you might do some long term damage to your body if you do that style. I have not done goju karate, but, the blocks and kicks can't be good for you, either. You need massage, ice, heat packs, rest, hot baths, and some tai chi to get yourself well. After a year, you might be able to explore a suitable martial art for self-defense. Just my two cents.

drummingman
3/14/2008 10:32pm,
in what way could wing chun cause long term damage?
and what style do you now take beezer?

Tenebrous
3/14/2008 10:46pm,
in what way could wing chun cause long term damage?

You'd be taking wing chun, for one.

Beezer
3/14/2008 11:04pm,
in what way could wing chun cause long term damage?
and what style do you now take beezer?
I'm on my 4th martial art school, and I think I found what I'm looking for, bjj and muay thai. I'm very blessed; at this school you can take both classes for the same price. Classes are very alive and have sparring, I'm kicking (no pun intended) myself for not going here from the get go.
I have done two chinese martial arts styles in my life. "Southern Praying Mantis", (which after hanging out at this site, I believe to be a bullshido), for 2 years and Wing Chun for 1 year. The horse stance, alone, will be a drag for your knee. In Wing Chun, I had to practice on a "wooden dummy", and that will stink for your wrists. We did "sticky hands" and a few two men drills that might not help your wrists, either. The stances and foot movements are a little awkward, and might put more stress on your knee. I DO NOT have anything bad to say about Wing Chun, it just wasn't for me. I only piped in, because, I think I might understand your pain in your wrists/knee pertaining to the martial arts. Talk to the Wing Chun instructor, tell him/her your concerns about your injuries, and take a lesson to see how your body handles it.

Lu Tze
3/14/2008 11:05pm,
in what way could wing chun cause long term damage?Wing chun can cause severe neurological damage. Symptoms include pigeon toes, compulsive arm rubbing (in advanced cases this is known as "chi sau"), the development of a phonic tic involving the words "principles" and "theory", and of course sucking Bruce Lee's cock.

If you suffer any of these symptoms please contact your doctor immediately. Or kill yourself.

TheMightyMcClaw
3/14/2008 11:09pm,
If you have knee problems, stay the hell away from karate, taekwondo, and most types of kung fu. Between unnatural stances and throwing snap kicks in the air, you will absolutely wreck your knees. Even now when I go back to visit my old Shotokan club (the most joint-destroying MA of them all), I do kata wrong on purpose to save my joints.
Also, avoid things like judo, aikido, and San Da which involve getting smashed on the ground a lot.
Wing Chun honestly might be one of the easier MA on your joints, but it generally has a bad reputation for effectiveness. If that's a problem for you, you might need to keep looking.

Lefty
3/14/2008 11:10pm,
in what way could wing chun cause long term damage?
and what style do you now take beezer?

In the chun you will often do wristy movements. Fook sao, til sao etc. My opinion would be to focus on a health program to rehab your injuries as much as possible (diet, weights, cardio).

S0meguy
3/14/2008 11:28pm,
Hey.

So I dropped a motorcyle on my knee at speed. It hurt. I also experience the occasional instance of vision-blurring pain if I catch a good whack to the knee (especially corners like elbow or coffee tables... hurts thinkin' about it).

You kinda' gotta' make a choice, you know? Is martial arts worth risking personal injury? To a greater or lesser extent we all make that choice every day, but everyone has different priorities. So long as those priorites are in line with your reality, you'll be happy.

With that in mind you oughta' take the advice of these nice folk and grab yourself some Tai Chi. It's a good art, even if most folks don't teach it as so martial. Honestly that's a good thing since so many arts described as "martial" really aren't. It might even help your knee. I've got friends who've had reduced symptoms resulting from chronic injury as a benefit of mild to moderate physical activity.

Take it easy, try it out, and if it hurts don't do it; least-ways if your goal is staying functional.

Squerlli
3/14/2008 11:38pm,
Heres an idea, take boxing and stop thinking about wing chung and krotty.

Permalost
3/14/2008 11:51pm,
Wing chun can cause severe neurological damage. Symptoms include pigeon toes, compulsive arm rubbing (in advanced cases this is known as "chi sau"), the development of a phonic tic involving the words "principles" and "theory", and of course sucking Bruce Lee's cock.

If you suffer any of these symptoms please contact your doctor immediately. Or kill yourself.

Heres an idea, take boxing and stop thinking about wing chung and krotty.
This is hardly constructive.

Kid Miracleman
3/14/2008 11:55pm,
Numchucks!

Seriously though, I would recommend checking out Muay Thai. It's relatively easy on the knees, as MT roundhouse kicks require little to no snapping at the knee. Make sure to stay on the ball of the foot when you throw a roundhouse though, as you can injure your knee if your heel is planted when you follow through with your kick (this happened to me last year). You'll also be wearing handwraps most of the time, which provide a good deal of wrist support.

Lefty
3/15/2008 12:07am,
I'd agree with the sentiments of do MT or Boxing. Focus on safety. Do weights and some cardio with lots of rest in order to help reduce your risk of injury.

Squerlli
3/15/2008 12:12am,
This is hardly constructive.

In your opinion maybe, but I persoanlly don't want to see him sign up for the chun.

DdlR
3/15/2008 12:21am,
If you have injuries to both wrists and one knee, that pretty seriously limits your martial arts options. I'll go along with the crowd and recommend tai chi chuan, mostly because it's relatively low-impact and a good school will teach body mechanics that you should be able to adapt to your physical limitations.

IMO the better tai chi classes are those that include competitive elements such as the "pushing hands"/sparring aspect, rather than just the solo form. Push-hands training may stress your knee, but less than would a harder style that includes dramatically deep stances and/or snapping kicks. Likewise, push-hands shouldn't place overwhelming stress on your wrists because most of the techniques are applied as open-handed pushes and a lot of the contact is with the forearms rather than by flexing the wrists or gripping with/clenching your hands. It's more about tactile sensitivity, timing and positioning than muscular strength.

This clip is a good example of co-operative (training) push-hands exercises -

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=76GNTdi7NV0

and this one shows the competitive, tournament application, from a critical perspective comparing American and Chinese approaches -

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kNAV_AurtKI

A bit more informal competition -

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YY_fkQXtbjM

Hope this helps.

drummingman
3/15/2008 1:05am,
thanks everyone for your thoughts so far.
tai chi sounds like it may be cool but i am really looking for something that is more self defense based. from what i know wing chun is close to tai chi right? what all styles do you all think may work for me that is more based on self defense?