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Fishgod
2/27/2008 12:12am,
Hey everybody. I've been coming to this site for a little over 3 months, specifically for the Nutrition, PT, Health thread, on recommendation by a guy at the academy I'm training at. It's answered quite a few questions and given me a heads up on things to watch out for. Thanks to all the members and mods. Anyway, on to the question.

I started training in BJJ about five months ago and hadn't really done much martial arts before that point. I took some TKD in middle school and had some judo based off what a few friends had showed me but beyond that I am teh noobage. Up until this month my rolling was pretty standard- more or less just getting comfortable with grappling and building strength and learning to keep the **** from out that triangle. Recently people have started commenting on my "agressiveness" and "squash technique". I wasn't sure how to take this- I hadn't really noticed much change in my game beyond getting tapped out less. Yesterday I was rolling with another white belt and I put an armbar on at what I thought was the right speed and he tapped immediatly and sat out for the rest of sparring. I did too because I was sort of shocked. I don't want to be that spazzy whitebelt who no one wants to roll with. Beyond going slower and trying to keep things copacetic when I roll, is there anything I can do?

Thanks.

BJJbot
2/27/2008 12:13am,
Welcome aboard, Fishgod! The Bullshido staff would welcome you personally, but the thing is they’re busy keeping the peace, so they’ve apointed me, a bot, to pat you on the back and assure you that in no way will you be harmed during your stay here at BS.net. Your views on the martial arts, your philosphy, maybe even your entire reason for being will be challenged, shattered, reorganized, melted down, and forged into something new and shiny, but we swear it will only hurt a little bit… at first.

Kentucky Fried Chokin
2/27/2008 12:17am,
Just remember to relax and apply techniques slowly. I don't know what else to say.

shironinja
2/27/2008 1:37am,
Try to think in your head about what the most correct way of applying a technique would be instead of just throwing it on and muscling it through. Concentrate on the positioning of your entire body in order to maximize it's effectiveness and act with purpose.

Once you are in the right position you can take all the time in the world to complete an armbar.

That said though I remember one asshole at jiu jitsu class who would seriously fake an injury and stop for the day every time he got subbed.

Only thing hurting with that guy was his pride...

Beastly Sensei
2/27/2008 8:43am,
Yeah, I'd just slow down and try setting up some other stuff first, then build up to the armbar or another comparable move.

slideyfoot
2/27/2008 9:05am,
Beyond going slower and trying to keep things copacetic when I roll, is there anything I can do?

As has been mentioned, relax and concentrate on technique, rather than slapping on a submission at all costs.

It also depends on your training partners: some people will be sensible and tap once they see you've got the sub secured (its only training in class, so while its important to work escapes, there is no point risking injury), whereas others will treat every roll as life or death, not tapping until you've snapped their arm in half. So, try and train with the people from the first group rather than the latter.

AeroChica
2/27/2008 9:55am,
Welcome to the boards!

In my experience, we've had ten times more injuries caused by noobish enthusiasm than by sparring. Frequently more serious ones too.

Do go slow, focus on position, technique and control. Relying on speed and power to get your move is a bad habit that will hamper your training, it wears you out fast and won't work on a stronger or larger opponent. Be patient and develop the skills.

You should also ask to roll with your instructor or a higher level student after class, and ask if you are using the appropriate speed and power on your moves. They should be able to let you know if you are going too hard, or if your training partner wussied out.

You are already on the right track by asking the question. Getting good at grappling starts with being humble and leaving your ego at the door.

Good luck!

Goju - Joe
2/27/2008 10:20am,
Hey everybody. I've been coming to this site for a little over 3 months, specifically for the Nutrition, PT, Health thread, on recommendation by a guy at the academy I'm training at. It's answered quite a few questions and given me a heads up on things to watch out for. Thanks to all the members and mods. Anyway, on to the question.

I started training in BJJ about five months ago and hadn't really done much martial arts before that point. I took some TKD in middle school and had some judo based off what a few friends had showed me but beyond that I am teh noobage. Up until this month my rolling was pretty standard- more or less just getting comfortable with grappling and building strength and learning to keep the **** from out that triangle. Recently people have started commenting on my "agressiveness" and "squash technique". I wasn't sure how to take this- I hadn't really noticed much change in my game beyond getting tapped out less. Yesterday I was rolling with another white belt and I put an armbar on at what I thought was the right speed and he tapped immediatly and sat out for the rest of sparring. I did too because I was sort of shocked. I don't want to be that spazzy whitebelt who no one wants to roll with. Beyond going slower and trying to keep things copacetic when I roll, is there anything I can do?

Thanks.

Chances are if you are worried about being a spazz you are not a spazz.

But if you're concerned though concentrate more on sweeps than subs. The better you become at getting people in inferior positions the easier the subs become.

JohnnyFive
2/27/2008 2:07pm,
So the thing about rolling that took me some time to understand is that it's not exactly about winning and losing. The purpose of rolling is to learn. Winning (tapping someone out or whatever) can show you that you're doing something right, but if all you're focused on is winning, you'll probably be stuck doing only a few techniques that you're good at, and you'll never take the time to do the things you suck at, and you'll be left with holes in your game.

If you have two new people, and one person is generally more aggressive than the other, the aggressive guy will probably win. Part of this is because the guy who is defending won't be thinking about counter-attacking, but will be thinking "OH SH*T, I'M BEING ATTACKED, AAAAAAHHHHHH!" If, however, you rely purely on aggression and strength, you may do better, but you might find that later, better people might not react in quite the same way, and then you'll wish you had spent more time learning how to break it down technically. I don't know you, so I don't know if this applies.

The other half of this is that people don't like to lose, and a lot of the time, they'll come up with some sort of comment -- like if you're a big guy, and you tap someone, a lot of the time, they'll say, "How much do you weigh?" And you'll tell them, and they'll make a "Pfft, well, there you go." face.

The traditional Judo way of making sure you're using technique and not strength is to exhaust you and then have you randori. If you're exhausted ... no strength!