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Obesely
2/17/2008 2:56am,
Martial arts and me...where to begin? After ....wasting 7 years of my young life in WC... I took a break in '07 to finish off high school. The main reason I kept up with it was to keep my old man happy (after 4 years of ruthlessly defending the art....I stopped caring). I knew the art itself was never going to help me when some **** finally went down. I always felt more comfortable just brawling like an idiot. My club was never a McDojo or anything like the countless TKD and Karate dojos in my city...but at the end of the day if you have to defend yourself against anyone with a ground game...most if not all Kung Fu styles are screwed, right?

So now am about to start off university (college) and they have a variety of sporting clubs. As far as Martial Arts are concerned...they have Boxing, Karate, TKD, Judo, BJJ and Kung Fu clubs. The only ones that interest me are the BJJ and to an extent the Judo club.

So... after doing a bit of research and checking out videos of club level and competitive BJJ/MMA fighters... I think I know it is definitely what I want out of a Martial Art.

I have no worries about the quality of the training, which has 1 hour in the MMA class teaching a mix of kickboxing/Muay Thai striking combined with various takedowns, and then 1 hour of BJJ which puts further emphasis on takedowns and then of course working on the ground etc. The cost for 2 training sessions on campus a week + access to an open 7 day marital arts gym off-campus...is around 100 bucks (Australian) for a semester. That is roughly the equivalent of 2 months of once a week training sessions in my old WC school. So it isn't money grubbing.

Now... while this is an extremely long post I just want to make sure I've covered all bases. Now, my physical condition. A couple of months ago I was 185 centimetres (roughly 6 ft) and 100kg (220 lbs)...and today I am 185 cm 83 kg (Roughly 6 ft 180 lbs) and am in decent shape.

Based off all I have mentioned... I need some advice from any students of BJJ on two key areas:

1) Does the cost seem fair/ does the class setup seem ok?
2) What should I expect starting out? Should it be difficult for me being only moderately fit?
3) Is there any other useful advice of precautions I should take or things to be on the lookout for?

Many Thanks,

Vlad

ysc87
2/17/2008 5:37am,
Before I start, I'm not sure if this is in the right forum, so don't be worried if it gets moved-

1) If the quality of the mma/bjj training is fairly good, price doesn't seem bad at all, even at the college club level, especially considering it's for the semester.

2) All I'm going to say is- groundwork is a hell of a way to get/stay in shape. Nothing quite tones your muscles like frantically trying to escape from a submission.

3) Make sure that the instructor/partner teaching you explains the intricacies of the position/submission instead of just applying it on you a bunch of times. IE, having someone who can just look at what you're doing and point out specifically what you're doing wrong. It kind of sucks when you learn things improperly, then have to relearn it all over again.

slideyfoot
2/17/2008 6:10am,
The cost for 2 training sessions on campus a week + access to an open 7 day marital arts gym off-campus...is around 100 bucks (Australian) for a semester. That is roughly the equivalent of 2 months of once a week training sessions in my old WC school. So it isn't money grubbing.[...]

1) Does the cost seem fair/ does the class setup seem ok?
I pay 90 a month for my training, to give you some comparison. However, I'm not in Australia, so would have to check with someone from Oz to be sure of what average prices are like. I'd expect it to be fairly expensive, as BJJ is still a pricey style.


2) What should I expect starting out? Should it be difficult for me being only moderately fit?
Don't worry about fitness: that will come as you attend classes regularly. If you want an idea of what to expect, then I'd suggest taking a look at the Starting BJJ Classes (http://www.grapplearts.com/Starting-BJJ-Classes.htm) I link below, or you could have a look at the blog post I put about my first class (http://slideyfoot.blogspot.com/2006/11/08112006-bjj.html).


3) Is there any other useful advice of precautions I should take or things to be on the lookout for?
If you're just starting in BJJ, I'd recommend the following threads:

Training, Stagnation and Tapping (http://www.bullshido.net/forums/showpost.php?p=974042)
Maximizing what you get out of rolling (http://www.bullshido.net/forums/showpost.php?p=1253088)
Protecting Yourself During Sparring (http://www.bullshido.net/forums/showpost.php?p=1234198)
Grappling Basic Principles (http://www.bullshido.net/forums/showthread.php?t=20609)
First Day Lesson (http://www.bullshido.net/forums/showpost.php?p=1232603)
Fundamental 5 (http://www.bullshido.net/forums/showpost.php?p=1019474)
Obvious Epiphanies (http://www.bullshido.net/forums/showthread.php?t=62601)

And the following articles:

Starting BJJ Classes (http://www.grapplearts.com/Starting-BJJ-Classes.htm)
Nuggets of Advice (http://www.aesopian.com/127/nuggets-of-advice/)

NSLightsOut
2/17/2008 7:48am,
Firstly, $100 Aussie is an awesome price per semester. I currently pay more than that a month to train BJJ exclusively, although when I first started I was paying $100 per year to train BJJ under a blue belt at uni.

Secondly, who is the guy you are training under, what is his affiliation and rank?

To answer your second and third questions:

2) Just do it. "I'm not fit enough" or "I'll come down when I get into shape" are two of the most common excuses I hear. The fitness never happens, and I never see the people again. Start training, and the fitness will come.

3)
- Don't be a hero. Tap
- Don't start psychotically flailing because it feels like you're making progress. Try to think things through

Dak
2/17/2008 10:17am,
1) yes, and if they put out fighters chances are they are an ok class
2) it will be difficult. just expect to learn. i reccomend taking notes (seriously)
3) tap

Shuma-Gorath
2/17/2008 3:01pm,
This thread reminded me of Aesopian's guide to your first day, which is now stuck: http://www.bullshido.net/forums/showthread.php?t=29939

thoughtcrime
2/17/2008 3:49pm,
Great advice given so far, the one thing i would add is that there tends to be a definite "wall of fire" period when starting bjj, i.e., getting tapped out by practically everybody, including fat guys, rail thin people, old people, girls, pre-recorded harsh language, furniture, etc. In my experience, this lasts for about four to eight months, faster if you happen to be a natural grappler, slower if, like me, you tend to be a little slower of a learner of this particular set of skills.
My advice, then, would be to check your ego at the door, maintain an extremely patient disposition, and remember that you learn far more when you're forced to tap than when you're able to beat a training partner.
I also would advise taking notes about any positions you may have gone over that day as soon as possible after training and in as great a depth of detail as you can remember. Like all legit martial arts, details make or break a position. There was a good article about this at the old bjj.org, but I guess at some point it was swallowed by OTM. I'm going to try and track it down if its still archived somewhere.
Good luck man, it's going to be an adventure.

Obesely
2/21/2008 8:24am,
Ok thanks everyone for your replies...thread can be locked now and I'll just use existing links from it as a point of reference. Unfortunately the BJJ club didn't even have a stall open on the orientation week club sign on day. Oh and @NSLightsOut, his name is Matt Cooper.

Thanks for the advice everyone.

Teh El Macho
2/21/2008 9:20am,
Martial arts and me...where to begin? After ....wasting 7 years of my young life in WC... I took a break in '07 to finish off high school. The main reason I kept up with it was to keep my old man happy (after 4 years of ruthlessly defending the art....I stopped caring). I knew the art itself was never going to help me when some **** finally went down. I always felt more comfortable just brawling like an idiot. My club was never a McDojo or anything like the countless TKD and Karate dojos in my city...but at the end of the day if you have to defend yourself against anyone with a ground game...most if not all Kung Fu styles are screwed, right? Yeah, but that doesn't mean all of KF are screwed up. I know this is not directly related to your questions, but don't knock down striking arts that don't have a ground game. A KF school that has a competitive Sanda/Kickboxing team, a Kyokushin Karate school or a boxing school are worth checking.


So now am about to start off university (college) and they have a variety of sporting clubs. As far as Martial Arts are concerned...they have Boxing, Karate, TKD, Judo, BJJ and Kung Fu clubs. The only ones that interest me are the BJJ and to an extent the Judo club. Don't knock down boxing, and BJJ and Judo complement each other quite well.

vinhthekid
2/21/2008 9:27am,
Yeah, but that doesn't mean all of KF are screwed up. I know this is not directly related to your questions, but don't knock down striking arts that don't have a ground game. A KF school that has a competitive Sanda/Kickboxing team, a Kyokushin Karate school or a boxing school are worth checking.

Don't knock down boxing, and BJJ and Judo complement each other quite well.

yo macho, i seem to be following you asking this quesiton, but you gotta explain to me the slam ball thing.

Teh El Macho
2/21/2008 1:40pm,
yo macho, i seem to be following you asking this quesiton, but you gotta explain to me the slam ball thing.

LOL. Dude!!! See my response :) http://www.bullshido.net/forums/showpost.php?p=1723057&postcount=9

Ok, serious answer : http://www.bullshido.net/forums/showpost.php?p=1723377&postcount=84