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sartorious
1/16/2008 7:30am,
Hey, all!

I'm a 31 y/o new newbie looking to resume training after a few years' absence. Most of my previous martial art practice (about 2-3 years) was in aikido.

Currently, I'm thinking of beginning two different styles because I can't seem to find a single style incorporating striking and grappling, while being accessible and having a solid reputation. From my 24 hours of lurking, I gather a combination of judo/BJJ and muay thai is a good starting plan, but I'm open to suggestions.

BJJbot
1/16/2008 7:31am,
Welcome to Bullshido, the best Martial Arts forum on the entire Internet, sartorious. Seriously, you won't regret your choice to join us. We're a great bunch of folks, except for Hannibal. And Sirc. And TaiGip. And MMA Kid. And... well, you get the point.

pauli
1/16/2008 10:37am,
welcome to bullshido!

first step: find the quality schools near you.

second step: figure out what they teach.

sartorious
1/17/2008 6:05am,
Thanks for the advice! It always seems so much easier to take things in the other direction, but the most important thing is a good instructor/school.

leec123
1/18/2008 8:50am,
Thanks for the advice! It always seems so much easier to take things in the other direction, but the most important thing is a good instructor/school.

Absolutely, there are numerous threads on here that give good advise on what to look for in an instructor/ school. Also check out the threads on contracts-mucho good advise on saving you money and hassle

Good luck in finding a school and keep us posted.

But for the record, you seem to have a good sense for what you want, it may be worth looking even slightly further afield for a good school in one of the styles you mentioned.

sartorious
1/19/2008 7:28pm,
But for the record, you seem to have a good sense for what you want, it may be worth looking even slightly further afield for a good school in one of the styles you mentioned.
Pretty much. What I want is a mix of striking, grappling, submission, weapons (sword, particularly) and maybe a few other things I can't think of right now. Initially, I was interested in the Bujinkan but it seems their quality control isn't what it should be. Then I moved on to an interest in hapkido, but I think that's a similar situation.

What I don't want is a generalized MMA curriculum being a mix of several styles. Not that I think that's necessarily a bad way to go training-wise, but I'd rather know "This is from this. This is from that.". More specifically, I'd like to say "This is what I learned from this style with this instructor.".

So, I figure instead of picking one art to cover everything, I'll pick a few different ones and perhaps progress more slowly. Muay thai seems regarded fairly well here, as does judo. And I like both of them because they both give you feedback. Either what you're doing works, or it doesn't. After some time, I might throw aikido into the mix. As for the sword, I don't know.

leec123
1/20/2008 7:19am,
Pretty much. What I want is a mix of striking, grappling, submission, weapons (sword, particularly) and maybe a few other things I can't think of right now. Initially, I was interested in the Bujinkan but it seems their quality control isn't what it should be. Then I moved on to an interest in hapkido, but I think that's a similar situation.

What I don't want is a generalized MMA curriculum being a mix of several styles. Not that I think that's necessarily a bad way to go training-wise, but I'd rather know "This is from this. This is from that.". More specifically, I'd like to say "This is what I learned from this style with this instructor.".

So, I figure instead of picking one art to cover everything, I'll pick a few different ones and perhaps progress more slowly. Muay thai seems regarded fairly well here, as does judo. And I like both of them because they both give you feedback. Either what you're doing works, or it doesn't. After some time, I might throw aikido into the mix. As for the sword, I don't know.

Sounds like you are looking for a good Japanese JJ school. Have a look around at some different schools if you can. The training shouold be fairly dynamic ( you cant really count when you are initially learning a technique and have to break it down)

One thing to look out for is that a lot of schools end up loking like Karate with throws. This is bad. My advice would be to avoid a school where the students do every throw from a double punch. It is very unrealistic. They should ideally be moving, blocking (possibly striking) and moving into the throw in one smooth transitional movement.

in our school we teach every throw from the front, from an attack coming in from both left and right sides, and from a clinch position.

You will have gathered that you need to be 'pressure tested' on these techniques, so they should offer lots of sparring and random defence stuff. They could also offer weapon training, this is normally at a higher level-they try and make sure you arent going to disembowel yourself first go, but they may offer a taster.

if you combine this with a good Muay Thai club, you will have a great grounding if you want to diversify later on

Hope this helps

Jadonblade
1/20/2008 7:26am,
A good kung fu school could also be good. San da will give you some striking and some nice takedowns. Most will probaly be able to offer a range of weapons, including the chinese broadsword. The only part it will probaly lack is ground game :(

leec123
1/20/2008 11:27am,
A good kung fu school could also be good. San da will give you some striking and some nice takedowns. Most will probaly be able to offer a range of weapons, including the chinese broadsword. The only part it will probaly lack is ground game :(

The most important thing at your stage is definitely to get out there, and actually check out as many schools as possible. You could find something that you absolutely love, in which case you are (possibly) bulletproof on these forums. Or maybe not.

This is a good place for advice, so if you find a few good schools, link them on here and ther is a good possibilty of some kind of recommendation.

Keep us posted!!

sartorious
1/22/2008 4:46am,
Jadonblade,

I didn't really consider kung fu that much, but I'll look into it. Ground game isn't terribly important to me at this time so it might work out well.

---------------------

leec123,

Once I find a place or two and think they're worthy of the bullshido analysis, I'll get back to everyone. And yes, the most important thing is to see what's out there to begin with. Thanks for the advice!

slideyfoot
1/22/2008 5:53am,
Welcome to Bullshido!


Hey, all!

I'm a 31 y/o new newbie looking to resume training after a few years' absence. Most of my previous martial art practice (about 2-3 years) was in aikido.

Currently, I'm thinking of beginning two different styles because I can't seem to find a single style incorporating striking and grappling, while being accessible and having a solid reputation. From my 24 hours of lurking, I gather a combination of judo/BJJ and muay thai is a good starting plan, but I'm open to suggestions.

First of all, I'd recommend you take a look at the FAQ (http://www.bullshido.com/articles/finding-a-good-martial-arts-school.html) on finding a good martial arts school. In general, signs to look for are a competitive record, regular heavy contact sparring and 'aliveness' (if you're unfamiliar with the term, Matt Thornton has a long article (http://aliveness101.blogspot.com/2005/07/why-aliveness.html) on the topic describing what it is and why it's important: he is the man most associated with popularising the concept).

If your interest is mainly in striking, the safest option if you want decent training is muay thai (which you'll also see as 'thai boxing'), along with martial arts like boxing and kyokushin karate. That's not to say there aren't good schools within other striking styles, but they tend to vary widely in quality.

If you're more interested in grappling, then BJJ would be an excellent choice, as the strong competitive element and ability-based ranking system generally results in high quality training. A cheaper option is judo, which is also much easier to find - the two styles are closely related, the main difference being that judo normally focuses on throws whereas BJJ is mostly about the ground. For more on judo, read the Bullshido.com article (http://www.bullshido.com/articles/judo-6.html) - there is also an article on BJJ (http://www.bullshido.com/articles/brazilian-jiu-jitsu-style-information-without-the-bs-2.html). SAMBO is another good choice, but even harder to find than BJJ. Then there's wrestling, which is also great training for grappling.

Alternately, you could combine grappling and striking by cross-training in several arts, or at an MMA gym (though technically 'MMA' is a ruleset rather than a specific style). Examples of well known MMA gyms would be Team Quest (http://www.tqfc.com/) and Miletich Fighting Systems (http://miletichnewyork.com/).

Finally, you could try having a look through the dojo reviews (http://www.bullshido.net/forums/forumdisplay.php?f=83) section, which might yield something more specific to your area.