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KindWarrior
1/03/2008 6:14am,
Hello, Well I suppose this is an introduction. (although as I read in the stickied topics, no one probably gives a rats ass.) I'll try to not be boring though, all the same.

I am a martial artist, and a knowledge seeker. I had no idea such a site like this existed or I would have been here quite a while ago. My various family members knows I more or less consider martial arts to be my life so I was given the option by an uncle of mine to have a member account to this site as a random gift (within the last few hours really...). (I don't think buying the membership was really necessary. Not to offend anyone by saying that though. Just since I had never been here before, it may have been wiser to just tell him I'd try out the free membership. But I didn't want to turn him down I s'pose. Also no, he is not a member, just a "Lurker" apparently. Likes to keep to himself I guess)

I am what you might call "young blood", only 18, but please dont judge by age... Actually, don't judge at all.

My study of martial arts began when I was about 3 years old. Watching stuff like Ninja turtles and power rangers and various super hero cartoons influenced my interests as a kid and I pestered my parents to let me learn karate. It also helped to fuel this notion that I wanted to be the good guy and fight the bad guys. I was probably a very bad student... at 3 years old you dont have much focus.

I stuck with it til I was about 11, then I moved away from that town. I continued to practice what I learned in my back yard and garage, but did not get around to finding a new dojo.

I did however take taekwondo from age 13-16 at my jr. high/high school as PE. It wasnt very good self defence necessarily (probably because it was a school thing)...but I was physically educated as I was supposed to be I guess (learning about the body, tendons, muscles and how to take care of them, keep em in shape etc...) and I got alot of good conditioning out of it. At age 17 I finally found by chance a Kung-Fu dojo/studio tucked away in the corner of my local shopping center, I never knew it was there all those years, it was well hidden.

I found that I really liked the sensei teaching there, he was very down to earth and proficiant as his art. He is also the type of person who is a perfectionist and will have you practice the basics until you start doing them in your sleep.. (thats a joke...although I really did have a few dreams where all I did was punching and blocking drills in a horse stance..)
I've learned alot from him and enjoy being his student. He does not teach for sport or competition. He teaches more practical things for situations that are "This guy is trying to kill me, I need to stop him and have no other choice". Although in the beginning you do more or less just learn the same type of basics you would anywhere else. I don't think he teaches anyone fully until he accepts them as a student and sees that they are in it for the long haul, not just dickin around.

In addition to all that stuff I do alot of reading about eastern philosophy and martial arts. I am also decently educated in knife combat and defence against knives. (Hurray for military family?)

I guess thats about it. Wow, pretty long. If you read all that you deserve some kind of metal or award because after reading it myself... it looks like I did the exact opposite of what I intended to do. It is very boring.... oh well, sorry. My first post and I took the time to write it so I may as well post it.

Peace,

-M

KungFuBot
1/03/2008 6:15am,
In spite of what some other web-sites would have you believe, we here at Bullshido.net welcome you, KindWarrior, with open arms and hope that you will share with us your unique experiences and ideas on the martial arts.... so that we may then make fun of those experiences and ideas.

Airman Kai
1/03/2008 6:36am,
You went SPONSOR already? Welcome.

KindWarrior
1/03/2008 7:28am,
Thank you for the welcoming.

Sponsor? Well, yes apparently so. But Like I had said previously, it was a kind gesture on someone elses part, I did not opt for it. Still grateful none the less, and glad I was introduced to this place. I've found alot of interesting reads while browsing around here.

slideyfoot
1/03/2008 7:38am,
Welcome to Bullshido!


My various family members knows I more or less consider martial arts to be my life so I was given the option by an uncle of mine to have a member account to this site as a random gift (within the last few hours really...). (I don't think buying the membership was really necessary. Not to offend anyone by saying that though. Just since I had never been here before, it may have been wiser to just tell him I'd try out the free membership. But I didn't want to turn him down I s'pose. Also no, he is not a member, just a "Lurker" apparently. Likes to keep to himself I guess)

Cool present!


He does not teach for sport or competition. He teaches more practical things for situations that are "This guy is trying to kill me, I need to stop him and have no other choice".

Ok, but worth noting that teaching for sport and competition does not automatically mean a style is no good for self-defence. It merely means that its possible to use the techniques of that style in a regulated environment, which conversely can result in people who are capable of defending themselves using those same techniques, presuming its trained with 'aliveness'.

That is in marked contrast to somebody who only ever trained 'self defence' full of eye gouges/groin strikes/biting in a predetermined drill with no resistance, for example. More 'deadly', but ultimately useless due to the lack of realistic feedback from your training partner. As it is difficult to train eye gouges/groin strikes/biting etc in a full-contact manner, Jigoro Kano removed the so-called 'deadly' techniques from judo in order to enable live rolling, which had the end result of considerably increasing efficacy: because those early judoka could train 'non-deadly' (in the sense it was possible to stop before causing serious damage. I.e, you don't have to fully crank an armbar, lock on a choke etc, as your opponent has the option of tapping first. If they don't, they soon realise WHY they should take that option, as they'll be choked out or bust their arm) techniques full-contact, they became highly proficient, and in fact more 'deadly' than their non-sparring contemporaries in 'self-defence' orientated styles.

Mastering Jujitsu has a great historical summary at the start which goes through the theory, which I've basically regurgitated above.

KindWarrior
1/03/2008 8:27am,
Welcome to Bullshido!



Cool present!



Ok, but worth noting that teaching for sport and competition does not automatically mean a style is no good for self-defence. It merely means that its possible to use the techniques of that style in a regulated environment, which conversely can result in people who are capable of defending themselves using those same techniques, presuming its trained with 'aliveness'.

That is in marked contrast to somebody who only ever trained 'self defence' full of eye gouges/groin strikes/biting in a predetermined drill with no resistance, for example. More 'deadly', but ultimately useless due to the lack of realistic feedback from your training partner. As it is difficult to train eye gouges/groin strikes/biting etc in a full-contact manner, Jigoro Kano removed the so-called 'deadly' techniques from judo in order to enable live rolling, which had the end result of considerably increasing efficacy: because those early judoka could train 'non-deadly' (in the sense it was possible to stop before causing serious damage. I.e, you don't have to fully crank an armbar, lock on a choke etc, as your opponent has the option of tapping first. If they don't, they soon realise WHY they should take that option, as they'll be choked out or bust their arm) techniques full-contact, they became highly proficient, and in fact more 'deadly' than their non-sparring contemporaries in 'self-defence' orientated styles.

Mastering Jujitsu has a great historical summary at the start which goes through the theory, which I've basically regurgitated above.

Thats a really good point, and you are absolutely right. I was not trying to say training for competition is not useful. It is, extremely-- it gets you familiar with fighting.
I suppose I should be more clear on what I meant. While we do train in all of those types of things the best we can, we can not eye gouge eachother and break bones, rip tendons and all that fun stuff. You just try to simulate it the best you can.

When I say we do not train for sport and for competition I guess I mean just that, its not looked at from a sports point of view, we are not training to be athletes. While we may still do the same type of footwork and punching kicking and so forth that you may see in something like UFC or Boxing etc... Its done from the perspective of "That guy wants to hurt and kill me, I tried to talk him out of it, no dice". We try to remove the concept of rules (like no shots to the spine, back of the neck, eyes etc..) because some psycho isnt going to have any, and its self defence, not training to get into scuffles.

But again we cant be injuring each other, we more or less just try to familiarize ourselves with striking to those areas in addition to the usual areas like solarplex, face, thigh and so on. Because when in the heat of the moment, somtimes you dont think, you just react and some moves may go on auto/or instinct because they are so well drilled into your mind. This also helps with being prepared for that type of attack being used on you.

If all your used to defending is the regular "honorable" attacks so to speak, something like an eye gouge or a nut shot may catch you off guard or surprise you. Even though you may still get away from it, it will probably disrupt your flow a bit. Kind of like if someone constantly trains with their hands in an elbow position, they may find themselves doing that in a fight as opposed to keeping their hands up.

The other thing I find useful is when we try to pull of something like a joint lock or...anything really... the way we try to look at it is, every action you take, the other person will have some reaction to it. So when we do such things we're encourage to do anything we can to get out of it to kind of familiarize ourselves with the things that may happen when my opponent tries to resist or counter attack. This can make pulling it off very difficult, but more realistic, in the sense that some guy is not just going to sit there and let you try to break his arm.

I guess I'm just getting way off topic. But in a nutshell what I meant is we train with the intentions of defending ourself because we need to, not to compete as athletes against other athletes, or training for health bennifits only. Although we still do competitions and sparing and that sort of thing. Its just not the main focus.

Hopefully I've been able to clarify myself?

After reading what I've written I have no idea if what I said makes sense or flows very well. Sorry if it doesnt, I just had a million different thoughts about what I wanted to say going at once and had trouble sorting them into separate parts.