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whisper
12/29/2007 6:31pm,
Okay, so my University has 3 MA clubs.

Muay Thai, which I'm currently a member of.
Taekwondo.. ..anyway.
And Ju Jitsu, which I know little about apart from it being a Japanese TMA.

Class fees for each of these are pocket change, since I'm a member of the student sports centre/gym. I've been doing MT for a while on and off, and am seriously taking it up again now. I'm looking for something to cross train in, for either grappling or weapons.

My original plan was to take BJJ outside of the university, as it seems like the best groundwork-grappling MA available. However this looks like it'll be too expensive, for now at least.

If I can do it for next to nothing (£1-2 per lesson), is JJ worth the time, or should I just focus on MT until I'm in a better situation?

cuatro76
12/29/2007 6:36pm,
Find out if the instructor does Judo as well. If so then take this class and ask him to show ground work when ever you can. If not, and he's just a TMA preservationist with no Judo skillz, then I'd say look for a cheap Judo school outside of your college. Judo is almost always cheaper than BJJ, if you are on a tight budget.

cuatro76
12/29/2007 6:42pm,
Find out if the instructor does Judo as well. If so then take this class and ask him to show ground work when ever you can. If not, and he's just a TMA preservationist with no Judo skillz, then I'd say look for a cheap Judo school outside of your college. Judo is almost always cheaper than BJJ, if you are on a tight budget.

cuatro76
12/29/2007 6:43pm,
Huh, I posted this twice for some reason... damn interweb.

TheMightyMcClaw
12/29/2007 6:56pm,
Find out more about the Jujutsu club. "Jujutsu" without a prefix can mean anything from traditional Japanese martial arts to full-contact fighting systems that include striking, throwing and groundfighting to RSBD type scenario based training to wonky complicated aikido moves. Probably a mixture of those, and god knows what else too.

Das Moose
12/29/2007 7:06pm,
The vast majority of "JuJitsu" clubs in the UK are generic martial arts - i.e. you learn some shitty boxing, some shitty karate blocks, some shitty throws, some shitty groundwork, and so on. Of course it's perfectly possible that your club is different, but I googled "nottingham univeristy jujitsu" and came up with http://www.notts-jitsu.co.uk/ - they don't look any different.

If you do MT and post on bullshido you should have a pretty good feel for what's a solid art and what's not so go and have a look. But seeing as how my uni's JuJitsu club manages to have a website which is full of cut-and-pasted Matt Thornton articles and still sucks ass.... I don't think yours is gonna be particularly good. It'd be worth looking at anyway just so you can see first-hand what bullshido looks like.

EDIT: Meant to define "generic martial arts" - what I mean by this is, there's nothing to distinguish the style. Where Judo has it's brilliant throws, BJJ has highly technical groundwork, Muay Thai has the superb smashing ability, generic martial arts are what you'd get if you took a few months of boxing, karate and judo, then compiled a big list of all the techniques and arranged them into a syllabus, and took out any semblance of aliveness. I find it really interesting that people profess to be doing a "simple, no nonsense system for the streets" or similar when they learn 30 different ways to respond to a single punch.

Das Moose
12/29/2007 7:19pm,
Hilariously they actually have in-house competitions -

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KNuNPU58_s0

The clubs round here do this too - they occasionally do 30 second periods of ground sparring and then once a year have a competition when only people who do the style are told about it. A six month BJJ white belt would wreck their ****. (No, really. We went to a local jujitsu associations grappling tournament and a 6 month 65kg white belt won gold in the absolute division. We have video.)

whisper
12/29/2007 7:27pm,
The vast majority of "JuJitsu" clubs in the UK are generic martial arts - i.e. you learn some shitty boxing, some shitty karate blocks, some shitty throws, some shitty groundwork, and so on. Of course it's perfectly possible that your club is different, but I googled "nottingham univeristy jujitsu" and came up with http://www.notts-jitsu.co.uk/ - they don't look any different.

If you do MT and post on bullshido you should have a pretty good feel for what's a solid art and what's not so go and have a look. But seeing as how my uni's JuJitsu club manages to have a website which is full of cut-and-pasted Matt Thornton articles and still sucks ass.... I don't think yours is gonna be particularly good. It'd be worth looking at anyway just so you can see first-hand what bullshido looks like.

EDIT: Meant to define "generic martial arts" - what I mean by this is, there's nothing to distinguish the style. Where Judo has it's brilliant throws, BJJ has highly technical groundwork, Muay Thai has the superb smashing ability, generic martial arts are what you'd get if you took a few months of boxing, karate and judo, then compiled a big list of all the techniques and arranged them into a syllabus, and took out any semblance of aliveness. I find it really interesting that people profess to be doing a "simple, no nonsense system for the streets" or similar when they learn 30 different ways to respond to a single punch.

The Nottingham Trent University* Jujitsu Society website is http://www.trentjitsu.org/ , which currently seems to be waiting for someone to set it up, as all I get is a database entry form.

There is a large gallery at http://www.jitsuka.net/jitsugallery/ that I've found, which shows a lot of the classes. I'm not a JJer, so I don't know how much it'll help.

Their description on the NTU Societies Page:

"The Jitsu club offers excellent self defence training, a vibrant social life out of club training and the chance to have some fun! Jitsu is a martial art based on the traditional styles of Ju Jitsu that originated and developed in medieval Japan. The core of the art comprises a system of throws, joint locks and strikes. Based on the principal of using an aggressor’s energy to their own disadvantage, Jitsu skills can be used by men and women to counter aggressive situations ranging from unwanted harassment to armed physical assault.
The Jitsu Foundation is an organisation with over a hundred clubs in the UK that teaches the modern and unique Shorinji Kan system of Ju Jitsu. With over 3000 active members and several hundred instructors - including specialists in modern sport forms, traditional forms, weapons training, first Aid and Shiatsu."


Shorinji Kan?

*Nottingham's second University; Smaller, so less sports/clubs

EDIT: Examples of their grappling can be found here: http://www.jitsuka.net/jitsugallery/thumbnails.php?album=21

Das Moose
12/29/2007 8:27pm,
Ah, well it turns out the club I was talking about is a member of the same organisation as the one at NTU...

whisper
12/29/2007 8:47pm,
Yeah, it doesn't look as strong as Brazillian Ju Jitsu.

Nottingham Uni have a BJJ Club, but unless you're a student there it ends up costing a lot (due to the fact you have to join their sports centre). The instructor said I'm welcome to join if I can afford it.

Das Moose
12/29/2007 9:00pm,
What about Judo? Are there any clubs near you?

The ground-game isn't as developed as BJJ but on the other hand if you can out-strike and out-wrestle someone their BJJ becomes irrelevant.

whisper
12/29/2007 9:14pm,
What about Judo? Are there any clubs near you?

The ground-game isn't as developed as BJJ but on the other hand if you can out-strike and out-wrestle someone their BJJ becomes irrelevant.

http://www.portlandjudo.co.uk/

Is the only one I can find. £3 per session isn't bad, and it seems well established.

PointyShinyBurn
12/30/2007 12:25pm,
Previous Jitsu Foundation threads:
http://www.bullshido.net/forums/showthread.php?t=24417
http://www.bullshido.net/forums/showthread.php?t=29841

SuperGuido
12/30/2007 1:01pm,
http://www.jitsuka.net/jitsugallery/albums/dec07/IMG_0970.JPG

This picture should say it all.

Magic pants automatically precludes any serious grappling.

whisper
12/30/2007 4:58pm,
Previous Jitsu Foundation threads:
http://www.bullshido.net/forums/showthread.php?t=24417
http://www.bullshido.net/forums/showthread.php?t=29841

Thanks for those links.. They look like an organisation to avoid.

Sley
9/11/2009 8:48pm,
Look for the mention of Grass hoppers, on the right hand side, they are too deadly to spar!

http://www.trentjitsu.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=3&Itemid=4


So you want to test yourself grasshopper?


A: There is no free sparing in Jitsu like you might see at a karate club. This is because Jitsu is highly destructive and there are few ways to practice at full speed without injuring your opponent. Therefore we practice in a number of ways.
One way is against a V. This is a number of people armed in various ways They attack you consecutively every 5 seconds or so. The idea is to disarm and disable each successive opponent. It's tiring but great fun and very rewarding.
There is also a gauntlet. Two rows of people armed in the manner as that in a V, but they can only attack you when you are ready and style and flamboyancy is the aim here. In our bi-annual Jitsu national there are competitions within grade bands to find the person who can deal with each situation the best.


If you sigh up you are not getting anywhere