PDA

View Full Version : Martial art effectiveness? Which to choose?



Pages : [1] 2 3

NEMESIS1980
10/09/2007 12:26am,
Hi everybody!

Greetings from Canada. Just looking for a little advice. I'm actively searching for a martial art that provides the following;

1) Effectiveness (real self-defence value)
2) More spiritual than your average Martial Art (without getting too preachy)
3) Something unique...

These are the few that caught my eye...however they all seem to have some serious drawbacks;

The 1st that I found intriguing was Aikido ... I read up on Morihei Ueshiba,(hope I spelled that right, no offence if I didn't) and found the 'concept' very interesting. However, it seems that a very real and present drawback would be that MANY claim that it's effectiveness is only as good as your ''opponent'' ie: ''if you don't grab my hand/arm the right way, I'm done for'' .... and that Aikido can rarely stand up to a REAL attack.

The 2nd was Wing Chun... conservation of motion seems interesting... the ability to defend ones-self in small places etc... (if need be) ... drawbacks; hard to find GOOD teachers... and the fact that it seems to lack a certain ''power'' ... speed is great...but without power, becomes ''all--show'' ... (based on people I've spoken to) ..

The 3rd (and most recent) ties into the first; Yoseikan Budo.. just came across it recently...it seems to have several elements that I feel Aikido alone, couldn't provide. But is this simply a more flamboyant version of the original Aikido? ...

... So that being said, I am looking forward to hearing from anyone who may have some advice/info for me....as I am very eager to begin training. I am also open to other suggestions as well, ...the 3 listed above are simply examples of what I've come across... I am far from a Martial Arts expert...and won't even pretend to be...so I trust that those of you, experienced can give me some real advice. :) Keep in mind those of you studying the styles I've mentioned above, I don't mean any harm in my comments, these are simply issues that have been brought to my attention. I respect all styles of Martial Arts...and their practitioners.

Thank you in advance!! Cheerz!.. ;)

Olorin
10/09/2007 12:36am,
Have you looked into Judo? Aikido and Wing Chun are not, in my opinion, very effective. Also Judo has an educational and self development aspect to it that could substitute for the spiritual aspect you are looking for. In general if you want spirituality find a religion that you like. Finding spirituality in a martial art is problematic at best and could lead you into a semi-cult like school.

Also this need to be moved to Newbie Town...

.

NEMESIS1980
10/09/2007 12:48am,
Makes sense Olorin.. speaking of ''cult-like'' schools ... there has been a recent epidemic of them in my area... namely ''Fang Shen Do'' ... they recently scoured the mall (where I own a business) ..and literally forced flyers into shoppers hands... claiming that this martial art was ''the ultimate survival machine'' ...upon speaking to several friends who tried these particular school(s) , they claimed that not only did it have a ''cult'' vibe to it, but drained their spirits (as well as their bank accounts) ... claiming that the school would fast-track black-belt rankings, and then encourage new ranks, to join ''the black belt club'' ... (for a fee I'm told) ... so those are the very types of schools I'd like to avoid. And again (despite my previous comments) I don't mean to ''bad-talk'' any schools, or styles...this is all simply what i've been told. So on that note,... I agree with you 100% on the ''cult'' thing...and also, yes I have heard interesting things about Judo ...

Thank you for the advice!!
PS~ My bad on the Newbie thing... lol didn't realize.

Olorin
10/09/2007 1:14am,
A good rule of thumb is to ask if you can watch and/or work out with a class (for free) before you join. Talk to the students and the instructor and see if you like the class. If they have all kinds of crazy fees, long contracts, or outrageous monthly dues you might want to go someplace else.

If you want effectiveness, ask if they spar and under what rules. If they spar hard and often chances are they are decent.

Just like buying a car, or anything else, do some research on the school and the instructor. If he claims to be a "world champion" fighter their should be a record of it online.

Finally, if after a month or so you do not like the school, the training, or the students, feel free to try something else.

Hanniballistic
10/09/2007 5:37am,
Where in Canada are you?

FictionPimp
10/09/2007 7:39am,
I'd second judo. The community is usually friendly, the techniques effective, and if you dive into all the Japanese stuff, you can get all the spiritual stuff you want. It has all the mysticism you expect from japan, it's just that most instructors and students don't care to hear about it and just rather work on being better competitors (myself included).

ViciousFlamingo
10/09/2007 7:47am,
Third on the judo.

Aikido generally isn't looked upon here as a good way to learn self-defence, and I and many other unfortunate members can tell you from experience that wing chun is a waste of your time. Don't know too much about Yoseikan Budo, but judging from your luck in picking the first two arts....I'd suggest you try judo first. ;)

M1K3
10/09/2007 8:09am,
Welcome to Bullshido. I agree with the above posters and judo is a good choice. You might want to consider mixing some different stuff together like BJJ or MMA and yoga. The yoga will improve your flexibility and there is a strong spiritual side to yoga, if you want it, without the cult mentality. Hot chicks also.

Sabateur
10/09/2007 8:17am,
1) Effectiveness (real self-defence value)
2) More spiritual than your average Martial Art (without getting too preachy)
3) Something unique...


Your criteria might be difficult to meet. I've moved around a lot, haven't lived in one place longer than two years, so have tried out several different kinds of martial arts and clubs.

If you're looking for spiritual you are bound to get someone preachy. I've had one instructor that spoke of spirituality in reference to meditation only, and then went on to teaching fighting without burdening you with endless philosophy. He was a major exception.

If you are looking for some spiritual activity, try and find it outside of the martial art, and use it to motivate yourself when you're on the mat or in the gym if that is what your goal is. Good luck with finding someone who has a balance, but more than likely you'll get a preacher.

Easy way to judge effectiveness of a club is to see if they apply what they teach. That is, if they spar hard against each other, to actually see if their technique works, or if they compete in tournaments.

Rest is the same as what people said above, I just wanted to point out that you might be in for a disappointment if you're looking for something with a balanced spiritual aspect. That's not to say you can't find a club with a great attitude that brings up its students in a good environment, but that's a bit different from mysticism etc.

There are a bunch of Canadians here though, from what I see in their location under avatars. Someone might be able to point you to a good school if they know where you are.

NEMESIS1980
10/09/2007 12:17pm,
I'm in Gatineau, QC (just outside Ottawa--nations capital) ...

NEMESIS1980
10/09/2007 12:19pm,
WOW! Lots of feedback! Thanx guys!.. It seems that the general consensus is leading towards Judo (not an option I had paid much attention too in the past) .. this has certainly grown my interest in the art. Thank you all for your detailed replies!! I must say, this is a pretty wicked site, for real discussion, info etc... I'm likin' it! ;)

Cheerz everyone! Thankyou for the friendly welcome!!

Lebell
10/09/2007 1:47pm,
Just dont do wing chung, waste of money.

I'd say judo aswell, at first it looks crude and it can be a bit annoying to learn (matburns) but when you get the hang of it you'll find it to be quite effective.

NEMESIS1980
10/09/2007 1:59pm,
So now my question is, ... upon researching Judo, it is evident that it is namely a ground/grappling art-form,..(unless I've missed something vital).. would their be any concern that it may be limiting in a real-life attack?... Now don't get me wrong, the short-answer to that question is ''try it'' .... the long answer would involve more research.

Lebell
10/09/2007 2:07pm,
uhm...thats the whole big thing, some people say its not so good because it lacks punches and kicks, the others say that usually a fight always ends up on the ground anyway etc.

I see it like this: throwing a haymaker isnt that hard to learn it sorta comes natural, but groundfighting and sweeping however...

NEMESIS1980
10/09/2007 2:09pm,
So it seems that Wing Chun is not the most popular style around here... LOL!... And something I've heard many times... I too have had an experience with an under-qualified WC instructor/school, who tried to glorify the art.. I went for a trial class...and later found out that the instructors replacement ''teacher'' had only been training in WC for 4-months...and already the Sensei was calling on him to ''take over'' the class...and not for 25-30 minutes...I mean ALL class..it dawned on me, I was being ''taught'' by someone only several weeks ahead of me... it all seemed pretty sketchy to me. Not to mention the over-the-top, mind-boggling, kick-to-the-figs $200-$250/month he was charging for 2x class/week. NO THANX! (not private classes either...this was the ''group'' rate!!) Seemed excessive in every way.

ViciousFlamingo
10/09/2007 2:14pm,
So now my question is, ... upon researching Judo, it is evident that it is namely a ground/grappling art-form,..(unless I've missed something vital).. would their be any concern that it may be limiting in a real-life attack?... Now don't get me wrong, the short-answer to that question is ''try it'' .... the long answer would involve more research.
Limiting? No.

Judo is not the complete answer if you want to be very prepared for an unarmed attack. Judo focuses on grappling, with generally more attention on standup grappling and throws than ground grappling. This means judo will not train you for standup striking, so if you want to be very prepared for an unarmed attack, you should probably take up a striking art, a la boxing, or even look into taking MMA lessons. (I know you're still thinking about it, dude, so just drop the idea of taking aikido or wing chun if you want effective self-defense. Seriously. Just don't.) Judo is a very good base art from which to learn good self-defense techniques, and for any typical dumb street brawl it will serve you more than well enough to kick some ass, in the same way that wing chun etc. will not.

I think the most important thing I can tell you is: Go train judo, chances are you'll have a great time. Then you can stop worrying about t3h deadly street, get tossed like a ragdoll, have fun, and start learning how to throw fools on their faces. You can thank us later.