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Student1980
9/27/2007 11:52pm,
Yeah, I'm a newb, tear me a new one all ye like fellers.

Anyways, like I've said in other thread I'm looking to get back into it (boxed for 2 years as a teenager and willingly express my ineptitude here) . I want to know if you guys agree with the line of questioning I was forwarding to potential groups. I state that, in no particular order, the following are important to me.

1. Live training: I figure that if you have no resistance in training you can't be comfortable with your art in a realistic situation. You need to know how your own body works in contact with someone trying to stop it. If I spend years studying a martial art, I want to know I can depend on it in a situation when an individual wishes me harm. I don't want to ever leave myself in a position where I'm thinking "I hope this works".

2. Respect: No hot heads. I don't want to join a group of self-cultivated egos. I'm primarily there to learn, not to be shown what I can't do (verbally, physically, or emotionally).

3. Flexibility: I played AAA hockey for 10 years, dislocated my shoulder while boxing, and basically felt sorry for myself for another 7 years and let myself get out of shape. I'm fully ready to commit to training, and I want to be pushed again...but not forced. With a group of advanced students, will I be allowed to progress at my own rate without being looked down upon (see question 2)?

4. Tradition: With what little I know and, as student of history, I feel that, however impractical, a certain level of respect must be maintained for the history of the art. Is this in any way provided by (insert group here).

Basically I'm wondering if those four sets of questions will generate bullshido answers if the group is full of ****?

Student1980
9/28/2007 12:03am,
#2 should be worded better:

**** talking is fine, calling me lazy while I'm pounding the bag is fine, calling me a dog fucker while I'm training as hard as I can is fine....I see that as motivation...guys talking ****. But don't do it seriously if I'm there busting my ass.

JKDChick
9/28/2007 12:53am,
I'm moving this to Newbietown so's people don't spaz at you.

Student1980
9/28/2007 1:05am,
Sorry, JKDChick, I thought I was being relevant.

Believe it or not I thought I was asking good questions for finding a non-MMA place to train. I don't mind a spaz....****, as new as I am here I assume its coming.

Move my thread back and lemme get torn up.

JKDChick
9/28/2007 1:52am,
Sure.

Student1980
9/28/2007 1:55am,
All I required was a reason, JKDChick. I was trying.

JKDChick
9/28/2007 1:59am,
I'm not anymore. Done with this.

King Sleepless
9/28/2007 2:12am,
I'm not anymore. Done with this.

Oddly enough, this was probably the last thing you said to your ex when he said, "I love you still!"

Virus
9/28/2007 3:26am,
Yeah, I'm a newb, tear me a new one all ye like fellers.

1. Live training: I figure that if you have no resistance in training you can't be comfortable with your art in a realistic situation. You need to know how your own body works in contact with someone trying to stop it. If I spend years studying a martial art, I want to know I can depend on it in a situation when an individual wishes me harm. I don't want to ever leave myself in a position where I'm thinking "I hope this works".

2. Respect: No hot heads. I don't want to join a group of self-cultivated egos. I'm primarily there to learn, not to be shown what I can't do (verbally, physically, or emotionally).

3. Flexibility: I played AAA hockey for 10 years, dislocated my shoulder while boxing, and basically felt sorry for myself for another 7 years and let myself get out of shape. I'm fully ready to commit to training, and I want to be pushed again...but not forced. With a group of advanced students, will I be allowed to progress at my own rate without being looked down upon (see question 2)?

4. Tradition: With what little I know and, as student of history, I feel that, however impractical, a certain level of respect must be maintained for the history of the art. Is this in any way provided by (insert group here).

Basically I'm wondering if those four sets of questions will generate bullshido answers if the group is full of ****?

1. If they are a bullshido group then they are going to spar very infrequently or not at all. They will answer in a way which downplays the importance of sparring as a measurement tool.

2. Well, this is mostly based on the personalities of the people that happen to be in the group.

3. I don't really have an answer for that.

4. Hmm, you say in question 1 that you want something that is effective and that you don't want to be left thinking "I hope this works", but then you later say "I feel that, however impractical, a certain level of respect must be maintained for the history of the art." So is history of effectiveness more important? The thing is, in the West a lot of "traditional" styles are not very honest about their history. Many styles considered "traditional" are really only less than 100 years old.

Many styles that claim older lineages are actually full of ****. This is the case with most "jujitsu" schools in the west. Real koryu jujitsu is difficult to find outside of Japan as licenses are not just handed out to anyone, especially people that haven't spent at least ten years in Japan and leant to speak the language.

JKDChick
9/28/2007 4:53am,
Oddly enough, this was probably the last thing you said to your ex when he said, "I love you still!"

I'm a romantic. I quoted Shakespeare.

Escrima9
9/28/2007 8:13am,
2. Respect: No hot heads. I don't want to join a group of self-cultivated egos. I'm primarily there to learn, not to be shown what I can't do (verbally, physically, or emotionally).

This depends if on the new guy sometimes. If the new person comes correct and with respect its cool. If he acts like thinks everyone there is his bitch and his going to boast about kicking the senior grades asses later...then you may have to show him what time it is...so to speak :P

If the guy is cool and you kick his ass then I agree thats just wrong.

BASE853
9/28/2007 9:28am,
To the OP: Looking for a cool atmosphere or looking at the attitudes of the senior students is a good indicator of a good school. If you want to get good you wil need to train a lot and hence are gona be spending a lot of time at the school(s) it probably should be a cool place.

Also, along the lines of attitude from senior people, rom what I have seen at the schools I train at now, it is usually the new people who have the attitudes and the senior guys who are cool. At the BJJ schol I train at everyone of the guys who have been there a while wants to help each other. Same with the kickboxing school. I have also noticed at the BS schools I have checked out that the senior people are more aloof, almost like the thought they were above the junior people. One thing of note, at the schools I am at now the many of the senior guys have fight records where as thr BS schools were headed by guys with no record. If you never try you never loose so you remain undefeatd.

I don't know if this is because both of the schools I am now are "sport" MAs and hence there is almost a team atmosphere or what but the guys I train with now are what keep me going during some of those days when it is hard to keep training.

So to bring that all together, to the OP: I don' think what you said was dumb at all.

Lampa
9/28/2007 10:44am,
I'm a romantic. I quoted Shakespeare.

Therefore, since brevity is the soul of wit, And tediousness the limbs and outward flourishes, I will be brief. **** you.

Yeah, Shakespeare. That's tacky.

JKDChick
9/28/2007 2:17pm,
I think it was "Oh, what fools these mortals be."

Coach Josh
9/28/2007 2:18pm,
Many styles that claim older lineages are actually full of ****. This is the case with most "jujitsu" schools in the west. Real koryu jujitsu is difficult to find outside of Japan as licenses are not just handed out to anyone, especially people that haven't spent at least ten years in Japan and leant to speak the language.

And those of us who haven't LEANT english should?

Student1980
9/28/2007 3:59pm,
Hmm, you say in question 1 that you want something that is effective and that you don't want to be left thinking "I hope this works", but then you later say "I feel that, however impractical, a certain level of respect must be maintained for the history of the art." So is history of effectiveness more important? The thing is, in the West a lot of "traditional" styles are not very honest about their history. Many styles considered "traditional" are really only less than 100 years old.

Many styles that claim older lineages are actually full of ****. This is the case with most "jujitsu" schools in the west. Real koryu jujitsu is difficult to find outside of Japan as licenses are not just handed out to anyone, especially people that haven't spent at least ten years in Japan and leant to speak the language.

Good point.

Thanks for the input guys.