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soldierofgod
8/29/2007 11:40pm,
My life long dream is to become special forces for the U.S. Army and for that i want to learn every form of martial arts that i can to help me out. SO i need some help to make these descisions.
I am about 125 to 130 and have very little to none physical body shape. (I learned have so muscle to push around would be a nice thing when i joined wrestling last year in high school) I do alittle UFC style stuff with my dad and so forth but my main thing is wrestling and i am not that good at it yet. So any ideas with what i should do would be appreciated.

GhostOfKimura
8/29/2007 11:41pm,
In spite of what some other web-sites would have you believe, we here at Bullshido.net welcome you, soldierofgod, with open arms and hope that you will share with us your unique experiences and ideas on the martial arts.... so that we may then make fun of those experiences and ideas.

jnp
8/30/2007 12:34am,
Keep wrestling. It is one of the best foundation arts for young people. Work at it, work at it as hard as you can. To become a good wrestler requires a lot of dedication.

Even after six years of BJJ, I still use the skills I learned from wrestling every time I step out onto the mat. Randy Couture used his Greco-Roman clinch skills and takedowns learned in wrestling to dominate during his recent match against Gonzaga.

Judo and Muay Thai are also excellent arts to learn. Boxing is also a highly underrated MA by most martial artists.

colonelpong2
8/30/2007 1:09am,
soldierofgod...

CAn I ask how old you are?

Just as a matter of interest

slideyfoot
8/30/2007 6:22am,
I am about 125 to 130 and have very little to none physical body shape. (I learned have so muscle to push around would be a nice thing when i joined wrestling last year in high school) I do alittle UFC style stuff with my dad and so forth but my main thing is wrestling and i am not that good at it yet. So any ideas with what i should do would be appreciated.

Wrestling is definitely a good idea - take a look at the UFC and the enormous importance of wrestling is obvious (like jnp mentions, Randy Couture is one very successful example).

As to general advice: first of all, I'd recommend you take a look at the FAQ (http://www.bullshido.com/articles/finding-a-good-martial-arts-school.html) on finding a good martial arts school. In general, signs to look for are a competitive record, regular heavy contact sparring and 'aliveness' (if you're unfamiliar with the term, Matt Thornton has a long article (http://aliveness101.blogspot.com/2005/07/why-aliveness.html) on the topic describing what it is and why it's important: he is the man most associated with popularising the concept).

If your interest is mainly in striking, the safest option if you want decent training is muay thai (which you'll also see as 'thai boxing'), along with martial arts like boxing and kyokushin karate. That's not to say there aren't good schools within other striking styles, but they tend to vary widely in quality.

If you're more interested in grappling, then BJJ would be an excellent choice, as the strong competitive element and ability-based ranking system generally results in high quality training. A cheaper option is judo, which is also much easier to find - the two styles are closely related, the main difference being that judo normally focuses on throws whereas BJJ is mostly about the ground. For more on judo, read the Bullshido.com article (http://www.bullshido.com/articles/judo-6.html) - there is also an article on BJJ (http://www.bullshido.com/articles/brazilian-jiu-jitsu-style-information-without-the-bs-2.html). SAMBO is another good choice, but even harder to find than BJJ. As mentioned already, wrestling is great training for grappling, so your experience in that sport will be of great help if and when you come to cross-train in other styles.

Alternately, you could combine grappling and striking by cross-training in several arts, or at an MMA gym (though technically 'MMA' is a ruleset rather than a specific style). Examples of well known MMA gyms would be Team Quest (http://www.tqfc.com/) and Miletich Fighting Systems (http://miletichnewyork.com/).

Finally, you could try having a look through the dojo reviews (http://www.bullshido.net/forums/forumdisplay.php?f=83) section, which might yield something more specific to your area.

soldierofgod
8/30/2007 6:25pm,
soldierofgod...

CAn I ask how old you are?

Just as a matter of interest

Sorry

soldierofgod
8/30/2007 6:30pm,
Keep wrestling. It is one of the best foundation arts for young people. Work at it, work at it as hard as you can. To become a good wrestler requires a lot of dedication.

Even after six years of BJJ, I still use the skills I learned from wrestling every time I step out onto the mat. Randy Couture used his Greco-Roman clinch skills and takedowns learned in wrestling to dominate during his recent match against Gonzaga.

Judo and Muay Thai are also excellent arts to learn. Boxing is also a highly underrated MA by most martial artists.

Ill keep wrestling cause i still got 3 yrs of high school and i plan to take state before i graduate. I just wanted to see if anyone had anything that i could build on the wrestling.

soldierofgod
8/30/2007 6:33pm,
Wrestling is definitely a good idea - take a look at the UFC and the enormous importance of wrestling is obvious (like jnp mentions, Randy Couture is one very successful example).

As to general advice: first of all, I'd recommend you take a look at the FAQ (http://www.bullshido.com/articles/finding-a-good-martial-arts-school.html) on finding a good martial arts school. In general, signs to look for are a competitive record, regular heavy contact sparring and 'aliveness' (if you're unfamiliar with the term, Matt Thornton has a long article (http://aliveness101.blogspot.com/2005/07/why-aliveness.html) on the topic describing what it is and why it's important: he is the man most associated with popularising the concept).

If your interest is mainly in striking, the safest option if you want decent training is muay thai (which you'll also see as 'thai boxing'), along with martial arts like boxing and kyokushin karate. That's not to say there aren't good schools within other striking styles, but they tend to vary widely in quality.

If you're more interested in grappling, then BJJ would be an excellent choice, as the strong competitive element and ability-based ranking system generally results in high quality training. A cheaper option is judo, which is also much easier to find - the two styles are closely related, the main difference being that judo normally focuses on throws whereas BJJ is mostly about the ground. For more on judo, read the Bullshido.com article (http://www.bullshido.com/articles/judo-6.html) - there is also an article on BJJ (http://www.bullshido.com/articles/brazilian-jiu-jitsu-style-information-without-the-bs-2.html). SAMBO is another good choice, but even harder to find than BJJ. As mentioned already, wrestling is great training for grappling, so your experience in that sport will be of great help if and when you come to cross-train in other styles.

Alternately, you could combine grappling and striking by cross-training in several arts, or at an MMA gym (though technically 'MMA' is a ruleset rather than a specific style). Examples of well known MMA gyms would be Team Quest (http://www.tqfc.com/) and Miletich Fighting Systems (http://miletichnewyork.com/).

Finally, you could try having a look through the dojo reviews (http://www.bullshido.net/forums/forumdisplay.php?f=83) section, which might yield something more specific to your area.

I would love to learn these things but i live in the middle of no where so finding these gyms i would have to drive 4 hours either way. But i will look online so i can hopefully expand my knowledge and practice on it.

kwoww
8/30/2007 6:59pm,
Stick with the wrestling and conditioning. When and if you get good and want to start crosstraining, go read slideyfoot's post. But remember, get good first, then look at other styles.

akuma25
8/30/2007 7:19pm,
keep wrestling! try out some Greco Roman wrestling. you'll learn alot from the clinch and you'll also learn about center of gravity and good balance for throws. you might want to try a little judo too.

kwoww
8/30/2007 10:29pm,
Oh, and I'm pretty sure learning a martial art won't help you all that much in the special forces.

Besides, you're probably like 14 (if you've got 3 years of high school left), and at that age, a lot can change in the four years between now and 18. In the two years since I was 14, my life has basically taken a 180 degree turn. Not better or worse, but I've changed in ways I could never have imagined two years ago.

I feel way too old for my age what the ****.

slideyfoot
8/31/2007 6:00am,
Even after six years of BJJ, I still use the skills I learned from wrestling every time I step out onto the mat. Randy Couture used his Greco-Roman clinch skills and takedowns learned in wrestling to dominate during his recent match against Gonzaga.

Thought again of this thread when I was listening to one of the Fight Opinion (http://www.fightopinion.com/2007/08/23/fight-opinion-radio-60-mauro-ranallo/) podcasts yesterday. In the second part, where they talk to Team Takedown (http://www.teamtakedownfighters.com/), the wrestler being interviewed (Johny Hendricks) was echoing the sentiments of another talented wrestler, Mark Coleman, back when Coleman first started in MMA around a decade ago. Interesting that MMA continues to provide an option for wrestlers after they've risen to the top of their sport.