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Berk24
6/27/2007 1:40pm,
I asked this question in another discussion but no one answered so I thought I would try posting it again:

I took up boxing training about two years ago as a way to get in shape, lose some weight. I had a couple of lessons with a coach to learn technique, but bought my own equipment (heavy bag, double end bag, speed bag, jump rope) and set up at home so I could workout often and avoid the gym cost. I've gotten to the point where I'm proficient drilling on the bags and my legs hold up skipping the rope for a few rounds, so I'm wondering how big a shock/jump it will be to get in a ring with someone and spar. What can I expect? Will the previous training give me any kind of edge or ability to cope?

ty5
6/27/2007 1:45pm,
My experience is that receiving punches is the biggest inital shock, though you would get used to that over time as the body becomes conditioned to it. Also timing, my timing still sucks, but that is beacuse I don't box very often anymore, as with everything practise leads to improvement.

Tango M.F.
6/27/2007 2:16pm,
Hopefully this gets moved out of MABS, but...

Berk24 - If you're really interested in sparring, take Whorian's advice and hire a trainer that can help you in that endeavor. Keep in mind that a good way to get into sparring is to progressively increase the resistance of your training partner. That way you can initially work on your timing and technique without worrying about any bad technique developed as a result of bag-work leading to you getting tooled.

You'll also learn what techniques and strategies work better under actual combat, which should be fed back into your training regime. For example, as a southpaw, my boxing needs to be adjusted accordingly - and having a right-handed training partner really helped me figure out what I needed to work on.

When it comes down it though, if you are training at a decent gym, you shouldn't have a problem finding partners of similar ability with whom you can spar.

Berk24
6/27/2007 2:17pm,
I thought the double end and speed bags helped build timing, it seemed when I was able to land combinations on the double end bag was because I had adusted to the timing of when it would bounce back at me.

Tango M.F.
6/27/2007 2:24pm,
I thought the double end and speed bags helped build timing, it seemed when I was able to land combinations on the double end bag was because I had adusted to the timing of when it would bounce back at me.

That does help for speed, and can develop your timing in a very specific rhythm, but fighting a resistant opponent can have a much different rhythm or rhythms (do you get what I mean my that?), if it has one at all.

That sort of timing can only be trained "alive," to borrow the terminology of this site. Progressive resistance is your friend in this circumstance.

PizDoff
6/27/2007 2:26pm,
Moved from Martial Arts BS, Fraud, Investigations, and Standards forum.

Reading forum titles, much less descriptions, will help enhance your site experience.

FickleFingerOfFate
6/27/2007 2:51pm,
I thought the double end and speed bags helped build timing, it seemed when I was able to land combinations on the double end bag was because I had adusted to the timing of when it would bounce back at me.

Mr Miyagi say: Bags no hit back!