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roscopeeco
6/20/2007 11:20am,
Afternoon Peeps,

i've now completed 5 classes of BJJ (also been taking Choi Kwang Do for about 5 years) and am looking for a decent book with the basics. it's all a bit of a blur at the moment but being a white belt again is strangely invigourating.

Cheers

AikidoBot
6/20/2007 11:21am,
Welcome to the Bullshido Forums roscopeeco... Make sure you review your dojo (http://www.bullshido.net/forums/forumdisplay.php?f=83) and add it to your user control panel so you can get the http://www.bullshido.net/images/dojoreview1.gif icon in your user info bar in your posts.

roscopeeco
6/20/2007 11:43am,
Afternoon Peeps,

i've now completed 5 classes of BJJ (also been taking Choi Kwang Do for about 5 years) and am looking for a decent book with the basics. it's all a bit of a blur at the moment but being a white belt again is strangely invigourating.

Cheers

Shuma-Gorath
6/20/2007 12:11pm,
Since you cross-posted this in newbietown I'm stapling the threads together.

OldDog53
6/20/2007 12:21pm,
No books, no dvds, just classes, for at least 6 months. Otherwise you will brain fry.

This was told me in the beginning, I mostly ignored it, and I got all eff'd up. Actually since I couldn't make any sense out of the books or dvds it was just my Master Card that got eff'd up.

No online tutorials; same problems as with dvds.

Careful use of message boards. They are best at non-technical stuff - dealing with any politics, conditioning, exercises outside of classes etc.

When you are ready, try to cultivate a drilling/training partner or two who is willing to work on problem areas with you, or help you drill techniques.

Private lessons can be helpful but shouldn't be used as a crutch or eat into rolling time or group classes.

Do a lot of situps. They will help protect your ribs. And you'll be grateful you did them when you get "knee on belly" used against you.

Ming Loyalist
6/20/2007 12:22pm,
the answer is obvious: BJJ, the master text ;)

ok, i was kidding (that book has been the butt of many many jokes)

right now you should be more concerned with attending class as often as possible and spending as much time rolling (getting tapped out) as possible. books aren't going to help much until you get a decent handle on the basics of the style.

when you've been there a couple of months, i suggest you get a copy of "passing the guard" if you still want a book that will help your game.

when you're a blue belt, then think about getting barret yoshida's book if you like doing no-gi stuff.

roscopeeco
6/20/2007 12:33pm,
Cheers for the advice

I had no intention of getting a DVD just thought a book may help me remember the basics that i have been shown in class...like you said my brain is already fried.

i'm pretty happy with my training partners...they're a friendly bunch and i'm not going to have any difficulty in getting advice or drilling my pitfalls.

My shoulders are whats hurting at the moment but this weeks already better than the first one.

ViciousFlamingo
6/20/2007 12:41pm,
I had no intention of getting a DVD just thought a book may help me remember the basics that i have been shown in class...like you said my brain is already fried.
Listen to OldDog, he knows from experience. :XXjester:

If you're having problems remembering stuff, take notes on what you did in class, with emphasis on the performance of each technique, right after class. The writing will help your memory retention of the techniques, and reading your notes over later will help with your recall.

roscopeeco
6/20/2007 12:41pm,
@Ming - plenty of tapping out been going on...humility is a fine thing

blue belt seems like a distant dream

roscopeeco
6/20/2007 12:51pm,
Ok i shall just let the classes permeat my being and essense of roscopeeconess and trust that one day down the road i shall be at one with BJJ

vinhthekid
6/20/2007 12:51pm,
passing the guard is great.

but i like mastering the rubber guard even more. you don't actualy have to play rubber guard to find it useful, there's lots of stuff in there that's just gold.

and bj penn's MMA bible has the basics of just about everything you'll need for MMA.

roscopeeco
6/20/2007 1:03pm,
@vinh - i've seen those books on amazon but i thought they'd be too advanced for what i wanted at the moment. i'll leave it for a bit and let things sink in.

cheers

JT-T
6/20/2007 1:36pm,
Take V-Flamingo's advice, get a note book put it in your gym bad write it down, and write it down after class (memory fades quick). It will help you learn it and it can lead you to asking the correct questions of your fellow BJJ. I still look over my old notes starting back in 1989 and gleam tidbits.

Teh El Macho
6/20/2007 2:04pm,
@vinh - i've seen those books on amazon but i thought they'd be too advanced for what i wanted at the moment. i'll leave it for a bit and let things sink in.

cheers

They are advanced, but they have some info that may be useful for you. But as other says, just practice, practice, practice. And do not neglect your flexibility. Stretch, stretch and strech some more.

roscopeeco
6/20/2007 3:15pm,
@JT at the moment i'm visualising things that happened in class when i get home...i find that easier than writing plus i'm a lazy sh!te.

roscopeeco
6/20/2007 3:19pm,
@el macho
Never been one for being muscle bound so i'm pretty flexible which i'm finding useful already (even though i'm getting a pasting)