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Deadmeat
5/27/2007 6:56pm,
Hi all. I'm from Australia's Gold Coast.
There are two things that drew me to this site:

1) I am a martial arts enthusiast - by which I mean that I am enthusiastic about training in martial arts. I am under no illusion that I am by any stretch a superhuman fighting machine, but I am reasonably confident I can apply what I know, and I can see what works for me.

2) I am a skeptic. Literally. I have an interest in philosophy - particularly in critical reasoning, and am fairly good at applying the tools of the skeptic (i.e. Occam's razor, Sagan's balance, and the burden of proof) to any given proposition.


Anyhow, I suppose this would be a good time to outline my credentials...

Off and on I tried boxing and Shotokan karate up until around 1998. Although I enjoyed them both, I didn't feel that they were really appropriate for me. Around the start of 2000, when I enrolled in University, I happened to notice a small gym across the road from my campus. It was called Shin Do at the time, which I believe translates to "New Way" from Japanese.

The school was run by a guy called Kerry Dunne. Here is a link to a brief article about Kez that was posted on knucklepit.com - a mma website.

http://www.knucklepit.com/mixed-martial-arts-kerry_dunne.htm

Shin Do was an MMA gym, focussing on boxing, kickboxing, and submission wrestling (no-gi stuff). Kerry was very big on practical martial arts, and many of the guys competed regularly in MMA and kickboxing events, as the philosphy at Shin Do was that techniques must be effective under real situations - i.e. if you panic and forget how to apply a technique, it doesn't matter how well you can demonstrate it against a compliant opponent - it's not going to be of ay use in a real confrontation. I graded to Blue Belt under Kerry. Techniques aren't fancy, and they are all covered in the White, Yellow, Orange, and Green belt syllabus. Blue, Brown, and Black require progressively more intense fitness, strength, experience, and heart.

At the time, MMA was still in it's infancy in Australia, with few good events other than Rings taking place. So Kerry, along with Ray Matsumura founded the Spartan Reality Fight Series.

This is a promotional poster (and I believe the DVD cover) from Spartan Reality Fight Night 12. Those of you who are familiar with the MMA scene in Australia would surely recognise Sam Nest - a dominant fighter in these events, who was trained by Chris Haseman - an awesome fighter and trainer who has competed internationally. I believe he even fought Fedor. He lost, obviously, but then again, everyone does against Fedor. :icon_boun
http://jols.com.au/product_img/dvdsrf12.jpg
Sam Nest's record on Sherdog Fightfinder:http://www.sherdog.com/fightfinder/fightfinder.asp?FighterID=1645

Chris Haseman's record on Sherdog Fightfinder: http://www.sherdog.com/fightfinder/fightfinder.asp?FighterID=1449

Kerry eventually moved to Japan, and his good friend and respected martial artist Vincent Perry Took over. Vince is affiliated with Machado BJJ through John Will.

He renamed the school PUMMA (performance Unlimited Mixed Martial Arts)
This is a link to PUMMA's homepage http://www.pumma.net/index.php
Shortly before Shin Do became PUMMA I took a break from training due to study/work/ commitments, and a rib injury.

I have since resumed training, but I now practice Judo at my local Police Citizen's Youth Club's - under Wayne Matheson, who is an Australian Judo Federation Representative . On Saturday Mornings Hector Lombard usually rocks up to roll with the braver guys, and he is simply amazing to watch. Scary.

Anyway, that's about it for my long winded rant. If you've bothered reading this far, thanks for your patience. I'm glad to be here, and I'm very approachable - if anyone wants to contact me, feel free to message me or post something. As I said earlier, I'm no professional, but I feel I am relatively competent, and I'm always eager to learn - as long as it's practical. I must admit, my Randori absolutely sucks - but my Newaza is ok and my striking isn't too bad.

BJJbot
5/27/2007 6:57pm,
We knew you could do it! Deadmeat posted, YAY! And if a bot is this rude, just imagine harsh this is gonna be. Hope you're wearing a thick gi.

colonelpong2
5/27/2007 8:46pm,
Sounds like out type of fellow.

Got all the key points in and backed creds where possible.

whats even better is u are not a ninjer

i hate ninjers

kwoww
5/27/2007 9:00pm,
Best intro post I've seen so far.

Welcome.

Deadmeat
5/27/2007 9:13pm,
Thanks for the welcome guys. I'm looking forward to getting to know you all, and learning a thing or two while I'm here.

Deadmeat
5/28/2007 11:01pm,
I think I'm going to like it here :D

alex
5/28/2007 11:10pm,
i like the cut of your jib. and i like your pants.

now hand over your sheep

gravious
5/29/2007 6:55am,
I used to train with Vince at PUMMA when I was traveling regularly to the Gold Coast last year. Great bunch of guys and a really friendly, relaxed atmosphere (although more so at the Burleigh gym). I really like Vince's stand up training too.

Welcome.

Deadmeat
5/29/2007 5:47pm,
Awesome. Vince seems to have some really great guys. I actually caught up with big Jim last night (http://www.sherdog.com/fightfinder/fightfinder.asp?FighterID=9480) - he trains with the guys over at five rings these days with Nathan Corbett and Daniel Lima.

After messing around a bit with him I had a Socratic moment - I now know how little I actually know. I can't believe how good he's gotten. I honestly think he could decapitate me bare handed if he wanted to.

As i was saying in my first post, I never got to know the newer guys at Parkwood after Kezza left, but from what I've seen, they're a force to reckon with. Haven't been to the Burleigh gym either, but I've heard good things.

Thanks for the welcome.

gravious
5/30/2007 7:26am,
I met Big Jim a few times while training there, before he went to Five Rings. Good bloke, very shy. I didn't roll with him though, thank god. He either would have crushed me or turned me into a pretzel.

Trained a few times with JJ too. He took one of the classes I was at shortly after he got back from Japan.

Deadmeat
5/30/2007 5:21pm,
Awesome. Next time you're up at the coast, Pm me. I'd be glad to meet up for a roll or something. Fightboi up at Broadbeach is a good option - for virtually nothing you can get access to the rings, mats, and gym equipment. It's just near Pacific fair. Next block over from Five Rings actually.

I'm not sure of your level - your Muay Thai would definitely give you the advantage in terms of fitness and striking - But I'm always happy to have a spar or roll with pretty much anyone (except guys like Hector Lombard - he literally scares the crap outta me). Best way to learn, IMHO. I'm more into no-gi, but since I took up Judo, I'm becoming fonder of the gi. Except for the fact that after a big session it seems to weigh like 100 kilos and radiate heat.


And oh yeah, I should probably insert the obligatory "up the Marones!!!" here in relation to the rugby, but I don't really follow much in the way of non-combat sports.

Edit: Don't know if you caught the last Warrior's realm, but JJ's fight was unfortunate. I felt so bad for him. He was dominating the first round - particularly on the ground, and got tagged by a killer shot in the second. That Tomohiko Hori guy has some heavy hands.

DAYoung
5/30/2007 6:25pm,
I didn't read this before.

Welcome, Deadmeat.

Did you study philosophy at UQ?

Deadmeat
5/30/2007 6:36pm,
G'day mate.

Actually I studied Psych at Griffith.

Philosophy is unfortunately just a hobby for me. I considered Philosophy after highschool, but I figured it would be difficult to pay the bills after graduation, so it came down to a choice between journalism and psychology. Journalism lost the coin toss :P

Maybe one day, if time becomes anything more than a luxury, I can go back and pursue it further.

I see you're a Melbournite... have you spent time on the Gold Coast or in Brisbane? UQ is a beautiful campus. They actually filmed that famous scene from Chariots of Fire there. I went there for a seminar a while back, and I didn't want to leave.

DAYoung
5/30/2007 6:45pm,
G'day mate.

Actually I studied Psych at Griffith.

Philosophy is unfortunately just a hobby for me. I considered Philosophy after highschool, but I figured it would be difficult to pay the bills after graduation, so it came down to a choice between journalism and psychology. Journalism lost the coin toss :P

Maybe one day, if time becomes anything more than a luxury, I can go back and pursue it further.

I see you're a Melbournite... have you spent time on the Gold Coast or in Brisbane? UQ is a beautiful campus. They actually filmed that famous scene from Chariots of Fire there. I went there for a seminar a while back, and I didn't want to leave.

Philosophy isn't necessarily the most cashed-up profession, but if it's what you do, there isn't much choice. Although academia's not the only place to be a genuine philosopher - after all, Spinoza was a lens-grinder (he turned down a prestigious post at Heidelberg so he could have his own free time, undistracted by students and politics).

UQ is beautiful, though I've not spent much time there, or in Brisbane generally. Melbourne Uni's got a similar feel to it - some lovely old buildings, and green grounds. As it happens, I saw one of the PhD students and a Politics professor doing some Aikido on the South Lawn just yesterday...

As for Griffith, what's it like? Do they have a strong Psychology background?

Deadmeat
5/30/2007 6:54pm,
That's awesome.

My Girlfriend is in her final year of a BA in Biological Sciences at Griffith. She's actually lucky enought to be taking a class run by Martin Bridgstock at the moment. It's her favorite class to date. we were actually talking about philosophy as a profession last night - she's leaning towards it herself. I admitted that I would be a tad jealous if she gets to pursue philosophy, but she reminded me that it can be pursued outside the halls of academia, much as you just did, although she used James Randi as an example.

Psychology isn't a bad starting point anyway, I guess.

DAYoung
5/30/2007 7:05pm,
Psychology isn't a bad starting point anyway, I guess.

No, not at all.

Many psychology students find philosophy very liberating, because it retains a rational and clear approach, but has a much broader field of application, and a richer tradition to draw on.

I'd cite Dewey and James as fine combinations of the two approaches - a reflexive naturalism, which appreciates science without being reductionist, and incorporates speculative philosophy without being groundless.

As Whitehead has argued, good philosophy is like a plane taking off, flying and landing. Imaginative flights of fancy and speculative theorising must begin and end with grounding experience, and vice versa. In this way, the ground is put in a sharper perspective by the distance of theoretical flight, but this flight itself relies on a solid ground to take off, and to orient the path of the flight as it lands. Keen speculation relies on the brute fact of particular observation, just as observation relies on speculation to yield broader abstract insights.

Properly done, psychology aids this philosophical travel.